Brain study offer draws sparse response from former players

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Now that football is back (sort of), there will be fewer hours in the day to devote to stories about the concussion crisis.  But a recent column from Ross Tucker of SportsUSA.com merits a quick mention.

Tucker says that, in April, he received an invitation from Andre Collins, the NFLPA’s Director of Former Player Services, to participate in the Former NFL Players Brain & Body Health Program, a function of the Center for the Study of Retired Athletes at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

Tucker recently took the union up on the offer.  And of all the former NFL players, Tucker was only the third to do so.

With more than 3,000 former players suing the NFL for concussions and more joining the effort all the time, there should be more than three who would take advantage of an opportunity to find out where they currently stand.

Plenty of players probably already have received medical attention and/or evaluation.  And the lawyers representing the former players suing for concussions undoubtedly are leery about the possible generation of medical findings that a player who claims to be impaired is actually fine.

Still, with nearly every former NFL player having played high school and college football before heading to the NFL, far more than three should be concerned about getting a snapshot regarding the current health of their brains.

7 responses to “Brain study offer draws sparse response from former players

  1. “And the lawyers representing the former players suing for concussions undoubtedly are leery about the possible generation of medical findings that a player who claims to be impaired is actually fine.”

    So neither the players or lawyers care if they are truly sick? You don’t say.
    So they sue the league claiming they were never given the opportunity to know the effects of concussions for the sake of money, while refusing to find the effects of concussions while chasing money.

  2. The biggest obstacle in getting a judgment against the NFL is the fact that most if not all of the former players who are suing played highschool and college ball.

    How can you hold the NFL reponsible for concussions these guys suffered before they became professionals?

  3. Not only should they be doing studies on NFL players….They should be doing a progressive study from peewee to pro’s…..Pro players going after the NFL is wrong if there is no study to show progressive advancement of brain injury.

  4. When will the NFL start pointing out that these same players played peewee, high school, and college football, and they could have suffered concussions in those venues? The NCAA certainly has a lot of money. Why are they being left out of the money grab?

    Seems to me the NFL needs to require the players prove which hits in which games did damage, and prove that the football prior (or after) did not contribute. I bet there isn’t film nor doctors reports (made at the time of their concussions) for many of the older players.

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