In poll of players, James Harrison named “most violent, dangerous”

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The belief that Steelers linebacker James Harrison is a violent and dangerous player isn’t just a creation of the sports media or the opinion of Roger Goodell. It’s also shared by many of his colleagues.

In an ESPN poll that asked NFL players, “Who is the most violent, dangerous player in the NFL?” Harrison was the runaway winner, with 67.5 percent of the vote. Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis came in second, at 10 percent.

An interesting follow-up question would have been whether players view the “most violent, dangerous player” as someone to shun or someone to admire. The league office has repeatedly fined — and even suspended — Harrison for his helmet-to-helmet hits, but it’s probably safe to say that Harrison would wear the “most violent, dangerous player” designation as a badge of honor.

In fact, Harrison and Goodell might even find some common ground in saying that Harrison’s reputation as the “most violent, dangerous player” is a reputation he deserves.

65 responses to “In poll of players, James Harrison named “most violent, dangerous”

  1. He is the most violent and dangerous player because he is an absolute, man-amongst-boys, beast.

    He is so much stronger than everyone he up against – so when he blows up a block or tackles a guy, it looks like he’s being overly violent and/or destroying them. Suh effect.

  2. Does this loser ever tackle without aiming for someone’s head? He’s a punk! Doesn’t matter if the player is standing straight up or not. He still lunges with this head to theirs! You suck Harrison!

    Shoe-la knows all!

  3. On a high school math test, James Harrison Norris put down “violence” as every one of the answers. He got an A+ on the test because James Harrison solves all his problems with violence.

  4. Ray Lewis, as the second most violent, dangerous player? I resent this! Has anyone seen the hits Donte Whitner places on people? And Suh of the Lions?

  5. Well.

    At least we’ve gotten the daily Steelers insult out of the way….

    Thank goodness for consistency.

  6. I miss the days when being the most violent dangerous player was something to strive for. RIP football.

    On a side note,isn’t it weird that with all the young guys in the NFL it’s the old guys(34 and 37) that are considered most violent and dangerous?

  7. A better question would be,”does he play the game the way it’s supposed to be played?” absolutely YES! Intimidation is an important part of the game.

  8. “I believe the Game is designed to reward the ones who hit the hardest. If you can’t take it, you shouldn’t play.” Jack Lambert P.S. if you don’t like the hits, quit watching. You can follow your fantasy football on the computer.

  9. opinevain says:
    Aug 24, 2012 4:16 PM
    Ray Lewis, as the second most violent, dangerous player? I resent this! Has anyone seen the hits Donte Whitner places on people? And Suh of the Lions?
    ______________

    Someone clearly isn’t familiar with the history of Ray Lewis. . .

  10. “I miss the days when being the most violent dangerous player was something to strive for. RIP football.”

    If football is dead why are you even here?

    If Roger Goodell didn’t take some action against concussions and hits that cause them then the NFL would truly be threatened by more incoming lawsuits and questions about the sports long term viability.

    The roughing the passer calls are a joke, that’s for sure. But blows to the head need to be eliminated for the future of the NFL’s sake.

  11. Makes me wish that ‘Rodney’ Harrison was still playing for the Pats. He would have something to say about ‘most violent and dangerous’, lol!

  12. geniusfan says:
    Aug 24, 2012 4:33 PM

    “I miss the days when being the most violent dangerous player was something to strive for. RIP football.”

    …But blows to the head need to be eliminated for the future of the NFL’s sake.

    yeah, you’re a genius alright.

  13. Yeah ok Jack. I’ll stop watching football because James Harrison is a dirty player.
    That’s a brilliant idea. Did you come up with it on your own?

  14. If your were to write down the job description of a NFL linebacker, violent and dangerous would be in the first few sentences.

    It’s amazing when past HOFers like Dick Butkis, Deacon Jones, Jack Lambert, and Lawrence Taylor are written about; violent and dangerous seldom come up. Yet no one who saw them play could argue that they were any less physical than Harrison or Lewis.

    Questions posed to players like this are not meant to evaluate players they are meant to create fodder for the glut of sports journalists willing to write anything negative about a sports figure.

    @eleventyeight – 100 percent correct, MF reporting on the Steelers makes Fox News and MSNBC scribs look like Edward R Morrow

  15. lol, it’s FOOTBALL! Goodell has turned NFL fans into women. Turn the NFL off since you cannot handle it.. try Oprah network or maybe cooking channel, wait a min… cooking channel has knives and cuts… might be to rough for most of your eyes to handle. Yep, goto the Oprah network, Disney channel is great to.

  16. Not necessarily a bad thing, if he puts fear into his opponents that makes him an asset to his team.

  17. Isn’t the reason why we watch this game is for the big time hits? Don’t we cheer everytime two guys collide with each other full speed what would be the point of wearing pads if you can’t even lay a hand on a receiver until he is ready for you to hit him? They are getting out of hand with this defenseless receiver bull imo

  18. I think Patrick Willis plays the game the way it should be played. He doesn’t take the cheap shot but he rarely ever misses a tackle. He is someone the opposing team always has to game plan away from. He hits cleanly but I doubt his peers enjoy getting hit by him. Ask Hasselback.

  19. Harrison is a punk.

    The McCoy hit last year is a perfect example: he could have DESTROYED him with a legal hit, but went straight for his head instead.

  20. Ah, I can hear the strains of “Renegade” playing in the background…the Bad Man is coming for you, best quit now if you can’t take it. Harrison is a beast, on the toughest defensive team in the league. Haters always gonna hate, in the meantime we”ll just keep TCB.

  21. cuse6468 says: Aug 24, 2012 5:14 PM

    Someone should take him out by a good shot to the side of the knees or a shot to the spine
    —————————————————————-

    Now THAT is how you prove that you’re so much more ethically and morally driven than James Harrison!

    Maybe someone should take YOU out by a “good shot to the side of the knees or a shot to the spine”?

    Way to take the higher ground 🙂

  22. The NFL awarded him player of the year honors, then fined him unprecedented amounts of money for playing the exact same way the following year.

    That’s the definition of hypocritical. No wonder Harrison is so irritated all the time.

  23. So, 67.5% of the players in the NFL are intimidated, perhaps even afraid, of James. Nice. I bet he has a smile in his face right now.

    “Put dresses on ’em”-Jack Lambert.

  24. halftermguv says:Aug 24, 2012 4:44 PM

    It’s amazing when past HOFers like Dick Butkis, Deacon Jones, Jack Lambert, and Lawrence Taylor are written about; violent and dangerous seldom come up. Yet no one who saw them play could argue that they were any less physical than Harrison or Lewis.
    ———————————————————-
    All of those players were tough, vicious hitters.

    Not ONE of them was dirty.

    I watched every single one of them, in their prime. Putting Harrison’s name with theirs reminds me of that song “one of these things is not like the others”

  25. rodney harrison is a uncle tom cowtowing punk now hes the most turncoat ex nfl player if anything.also i agree with james harrison being number one but theres a successor coming named patrick willis who is also a beast.

  26. steelersownyou says:
    Aug 24, 2012 4:17 PM
    Coming for your neck manning. You can run, but that stack of dime neck can’t hide..

    I have no interest in Manning or the Steelers, but this is a game–a game played at a very high level but still a game. And to say that your team is coming after somebody’s neck, well the truth is you should be banned from the site. I am sure you are already banned from society because who would deal with a punk like you? I’m sure your only refuge is a site like this where you can act tough as long as you stay hidden. As I typed these words, I suddenly realized–I just pity a person like you.

  27. James Harrison’s post-NFL life: Parkinson’s, dementia, and then cte will be found if his brain is studied after he passes. Some guys will never learn, you don’t tackle with your helmet, that’s what the shoulder pads are for.

  28. The only thing that makes Harrison the “most violent, dangerous” player is the crown of his helmet. Has he ever blown anyone up legally? Look at highlights on Lewis and Harrison and tell me who is the most violent hitter without getting flagged. Ray uses his shoulder/body, Harrison uses his helmet. It’s only a matter time till he injures himself trying to take someone out with the crown of his helmet. Will it be a serious concussion or paralysis?

  29. It’s funny reading all of these comments.

    James Harrison has been fined less over the past 4 years than Ray Lewis has.

    He had one infraction last year (so did Ray) and one helmet to helmet hit the year before. His other fines came on “late” hits, 2 of which were not late at all.

    So every commenter who asks, “has he ever tackled someone legally?” is just a tremendously ignorant person.

    Watch him play. Out of 800 defensive snaps in a season, he has 2 issues and everyone says he’s dirty.

    I will say this: he is probably the most dangerous and violent, but largely because he’s a monster of a linebacker.

    Only non-defensive lineman who I’ve seen take a pro-bowl tackle and pro-bowl guard into the backfield with both of them illegally holding him.

  30. pftcensorssuck

    Not one of them was dirty?

    You’ve never watched Deacon Jones play, have you?

    Do yourself a favor: When you don’t know what you’re talking about, stop talking.

  31. Of course he was. He’s a dirty player, who plays for a terrible team that won’t finish above .500.

  32. @ johntonioholmes … you beat me to it. Anyone who says that Dick Butkis, Deacon Jones, Jack Lambert, and Lawrence Taylor *never* played dirty never watched them.

    Also – the definition of “clean” and “dirty” have changed dramatically.

    Funny how suggestions to permanently injure someone are acceptable. Must be part of right-wing morality.

  33. @johntonioholmes

    Son, I was admiring Deacon Jones’ play, when you were still in Daddy’s nutsack.

    Shut up.

  34. I can’t think of two linebackers I’d rather have on my team than James Harrison and Ray Lewis. Both are intelligent, passionate, driven players who understand how the game is supposed to be played. And if film tells the story, neither is a dirty player. They’re also both a lot smarter than people who don’t listen seem to grasp.

    Agree with you, MDS, that I’d have liked the answer to your follow-up question. My guess is that most players admire Harrison and Lewis. If not … we’re in for some mighty dull football after they retire.

  35. I think it’s all about how you interpret “dirty”. I grew up on football in the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s and rules were much different. A lot of the players mentioned in previous posts weren’t considered dirty when you look at the rules of the time. Dick “Nite Train” Lane who is in the HOF was the master of the close line which is illegal now, but when he played it made him famous. I think the major difference then and now is that players didn’t “launch” themselves headfirst like they do now. To me, that’s the major difference and James hasn’t adjusted to the rules change, so I think a lot of players are judging him based on that.

    The hit on McCoy last year? He could have easily broken his entire rib cage, but he went for the head shot instead and it’s not legal anymore. And I hate the whole “launching” technique because the defensive player is at just as much risk of serious spinal cord injury as the offensive player.

    Just an opinion…

  36. @ pftcensorssuck

    You’re clueless.

    Dick Butkis bragged in his biography about biting players and refs in a pileup after the play.

    Deacon Jones admitted to having a piece of steel taped into his padding on his hands in order to “ring the bell” of offensive lineman. He also boasted about cracking the helmets a few times with the hidden steel bar.

  37. Football is a violent game. I would call that a complement. Harrison is a beast! All you cry baby haters keep hating. Back when football was actually a contact sport…. 3 yrs ago…. That would be called dominating.

  38. The poll was, of course, administered only to the WRs and OTs of the AFCN, hence the focus on James Harrison and Ray Lewis.

    Maybe if they’d asked more that 20-ish guys in his division the answer might have been different.

    But, in good Steelers-hating form, the author clarified neither sample size nor source so it can be fairly assumed the pollsters asked loaded questions and got the loaded answers they wanted.

    Way to create the news you’re too lazy to investigate or search out.

  39. vincentbojackson says:Aug 24, 2012 6:07 PM

    The NFL awarded him player of the year honors, then fined him unprecedented amounts of money for playing the exact same way the following year.

    That’s the definition of hypocritical. No wonder Harrison is so irritated all the time.

    ———————————————————-

    My sentiments exactly! The same style of play that earned him DPOY, has now earned him the “dirty player” label. James didn’t change, the rules did mid-stream, and as a result so did perceptions. That is the height of hypocrisy by the NFL, fans and players alike. Goodell got the propaganda machine going full blast. And it’s working like a charm.

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