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75-man roster tracker

NFL teams have until 4 PM EDT on Monday, August 27 to cut their rosters from 90 players to 75 players. We’ll track all the moves that every team makes to get down to 75 players right here.

Arizona Cardinals: Got down to the 75-player limit on Friday by putting LT Levi Brown on injured reserve, waiving fullback Jared Crank and running back Thomas Clayton with the waived-injured designation, and releasing DE Landon Cohen, WR Gino Crump, S Eddie Elder, WR Tre Gray, CB Marshay Green, WR Jaymar Johnson, FB Reagan Maui’a, LB Marcus McGraw, LB Zack Nash, CB James Nixon, K/P Ricky Schmitt and LB Paul Vassalo.

Atlanta Falcons: Got down to the 75-player limit on Saturday by putting tackle Will Svitek on injured reserve, waiving tight end Chase Coffman, linebacker Max Gruder, kicker Erik Folk, running back Richard Medlin, fullback Lee Meisner, defensive end Louis Nzegwu, receiver Kenny Stafford and tight end Aron White and reaching injury settlements with defensive tackle Elisha Joseph and cornerback Darrin Walls.  The Falcons also waived quarterback John Parker Wilson and placed defensive tackle Corey Peters on the reserve/non-football injury list.

Baltimore RavensCut nine on Sunday, including kicker Billy Cundiff, tight end Davon Drew, receiver Devin Goda, offensive lineman Addison Lawrence, cornerback Jordan Maybin, center Cecil Newton (brother of Cam), long snapper Patrick Scales, quarterback Chester Stewart, and receiver Patrick Williams. Finished things up on Monday by placing linebacker Terrell Suggs and wide receiver David Reed on reserve/PUP and placing linebacker Stevie Baggs, linebacker Darryl Blackstock, safety Emanuel Cook and defensive tackle Ryan McBean on injured reserve.

Buffalo Bills: Made 10 moves Sunday to get to the limit. They placed tight end Mike Caussin on reserve/PUP, and released nine players: Wide receiver David Clowney, cornerback Prince Miller, linebacker Danny Batten, defensive end Sean Ferguson, tight end Fendi Onobun, defensive tackle Jay Ross, wide receiver Derek Session, defensive back Nick Sukay and guard Jake Vermiglio.  Batten was waived with the designation “failure to disclose physical condition.”

Carolina Panthers: Started the process of getting down to 75 by cutting their veteran punter and their veteran kicker, Nick Harris and Olindo Mare. They also put promising wide receiver David Gettis on reserve/PUP list, and cornerback Brandon Hogan on IR, and waived wide receivers Darvin Adams, Michael Avila, Brenton Bersin and Rico Wallace (with injury settlement), running backs Josh Vaughan and Lyndon Rowells, tight end Greg Smith, guards Roger Allen and Will Blackwell and linebacker-defensive end Eric Norwood.

Chicago Bears: Made 12 moves Sunday, getting the roster to 76 the day before the deadline. They placed safety Brandon Hardin on IR, receiver Johnny Knox on reserve/PUP, and released veteran defensive tackle John McCargo. They also waived linebacker K.C. Asiodu, quarterback Matt Blanchard, safety Trevor Coston, receiver Terriun Crump, receiver Chris Summers, defensive end Derek Walker, and defensive end Thaddeus Gibson.  They also waived/injured linebacker Adrien Cole and guard Nick Pieschel. The Bears’ final move was cutting former supplemental draft pick Harvey Unga, which got them down to 75.

Cincinnati Bengals: Got down to 76 players on Friday by putting cornerback Brandon Ghee, cornerback Shaun Prater, receiver/cornerback Taveon Rodgers, safety Robert Sands, and guard Travelle Wharton on injured reserve, and releasing defensive end Luke Black, running back Aaron Brown, quarterback Tyler Hansen, and guard Matt Murphy. Wide receiver Kashif Moore was waived on Monday to complete the cuts.

Cleveland BrownsMoved to 80 on Sunday by waiving offensive lineman Jake Anderson, offensive lineman Matt Cleveland, defensive back Emanuel Davis, linebacker JoJo Dickson, punter Spencer Lanning, receiver Carlton Mitchell, receiver Bert Reed, receiver Jermaine Saffold, and receiver Owen SpencerGot to 75 on Monday by waiving with the “injured” designation defensive lineman Marcus Benard, defensive lineman Auston English, and defensive back Antwuan Reed,  placing linebacker Chris Gocong and sixth-round rookie linebacker Emmanuel Acho on injured reserve, and converting defensive lineman Phil Taylor from the active/Physically Unable to Perform list to the reserve/PUP list.

Dallas Cowboys: Dallas got down to 76 players after releasing tackle Levy Adcock, punter Delbert Alvarado, tight end Harry Flaherty, receiver David Little, tackle Tyrone Novikoff, receiver Raymond Radway, running back Javarris Williams and cornerback C.J. Wilson. They also waived/injured receiver Donavon Kemp and linebacker Caleb McSurdy, and put guard/center Kevin Kowalski on the physically unable to perform list. They got to 75 by releasing long snapper Charley Hughlett, who had a partially guaranteed contract.

Denver Broncos: Got down to 75 by cutting veteran long snapper Lonnie Paxton, putting defensive end Jason Hunter on injured reserve and waiving linebacker Elliot Coffey, wide receiver Mark Dell, wide receiver Cameron Kenney, tight end Anthony Miller, defensive end Cyril Obiozor, running back Xavier Omon, safety Anthony Perkins, tackle Mike Remmers, cornerback Ramzee Robinson, fullback Austin Sylvester and guard Austin Wuebbels.

Detroit Lions: The Lions got down to 80 players after waiving fullback James Bryant, receiver Jarett Dillard, running back Stephfon Green, safety Sean Jones, guard Jacques McClendon, linebacker Slade Norris (injured), guard J.C. Oram, defensive tackle Bobby Skinner, kicker Derek Dimke and receiver Terrence Toliver. Running back Jahvid Best’s slow recovery from a concussion landed him on the PUP list where he’ll join cornerback Chris Greenwood. Offensive linemen Jonathan Scott and Bill Nagy were placed on injured reserve and wide receiver Dominique Curry and wide receiver Isaac Madison were released.  Also, an injury settlement was reached with defensive back Don Carey, who had been on injured reserve.

Green Bay Packers: Got down to 75 on Monday by placing linebacker Desmond Bishop, running back Du’ane Bennett, tight end DeMarco Cosby, guard Ray Dominguez, defensive end Johnny Jones and receiver Shaky Smithson on injured reserve. Tight end Andrew Quarless and linebacker Frank Zombo were placed on reserve/physically unable to perform. The Packers also released fullback Jon Hoese and defensive end Jarius Wynn. Green Bay began the cuts on Friday by releasing DE Anthony Hargrove, WR Andrew Brewer, S Micah Pellerin, T Herb Taylor and CB Dion Turner.

Houston Texans: Made their moves Sunday, cutting veteran LB Omar Gaither and WR Bryant Johnson among others. They also put rookie kicker Randy Bullock on injured reserve, and waived-injured nose tackle Sunny Harris and linebacker Greg William. Linebacker Darryl Sharpton was placed on reserve-PUP, and they released the following: Tackle Nick Mondek, center Thomas Austin, punter Brett Hartmann, receiver Mario Lewis, running back Davin Meggett, defensive end Jimmy Saddler-McQueen, fullback Derrell Smith, guard Kasey Studdard and cornerback Torri Williams.

Indianapolis Colts: Got the ball rolling on Sunday by waiving cornerback Chris Rucker, cornerback Cameron Chism, cornerback Terrence Johnson, cornerback Antonio Fenelus, safety Matt Merletti, safety David Caldwell, linebacker Mike Balogun, wide receiver Quan Cosby, running back Alvester Alexander, guard Jason Foster and punter Brian Stahovich. They got to the limit Monday by placing defensive tackle Brandon McKinney and offensive tackle George Foster were placed on injured reserve, along with wide receiver Griff Whalen. Rookie defensive tackle Josh Chapman and guard Justin Anderson were placed on the reserve/PUP list, which will keep them on the shelf for at least the first six weeks.

Jacksonville Jaguars: Cut eight players on Saturday: cornerback Ashton Youboty, quarterback Nathan Enderle, receiver Chastin West, linebacker Nate Bussey, running back DuJuan Harris, cornerback Mike Holmes, tackle Dan Hoch, and linebacker Donovan Richard.  Finished the move to 75 on Monday by placing guard John Estes, guard Drew Nowak, guard/center Jason Spitz, and tight end Matt Veldman on injured reserve.  Also, fullback Brock Bolen was waived with the injured designation, and defensive end John Chick and linebacker Clint Session were shifted from the active/PUP list to the reserve/PUP list.

Kansas City Chiefs: The Chiefs cut 14 players Sunday to get to the limit. They released second-year wideout Jeremy Horne, who had yet to record a regular season catch, as well as former Army linebacker Caleb Campbell. Also released were: Fullback Shane Bannon, tight end Tim Biere, wide receivers Brandon Kinnie, Zeke Markshausen and Aaron Weaver, offensive linemen Justin Cheadle and Cam Hollland, defensive end Ethan Johnson (waived for failure to disclose physical condition), linebacker Dexter Heyman, defensive backs Dominique Ellis and Jean Fanor and kicker Matt Szymanski.

Miami Dolphins: Cut Hard Knocks star Les Brown as well as defensive tackle Chas Alecxih, cornerback Marcus Brown, safety Tyrell Johnson, cornerback Trenton Hughes, linebacker Josh Linam, running back Jerome Messam, defensive end Jacquies Smith and cornerback Jonathan Wade. Placed running back Jonas Gray on the physically unable to perform list.

Minnesota Vikings: Got down to 75 players on Saturday by waiving guard Bridger Buche, running back Derrick Coleman, guard Grant Cook, linebacker Soloman Elimimian, defensive back Corey Gatewood, tackle Levi Horn, defensive end Anthony Jacobs, receiver Kamar Jorden, receiver A.J. Love, linebacker Tyler Nielsen, defensive end Ernest Owusu, defensive tackle Tydreke Powell, cornerback Chris Stroud, receiver Kerry Taylor, and receiver Bryan Walters. The Vikings previously waived rookie receiver Greg Childs and rookie defensive back Nicholas Taylor, both of whom reverted to the team’s injured reserve list.

New England Patriots: Cleared out some veteran receivers, including Donte’ Stallworth and Jabar Gaffney. They also released were defensive linemen Gerard Warren and Tim Bulman and safety Ross Ventrone. Defensive back Will Allen, safety Josh Barrett and fullback Spencer Larsen were placed on injured reserve, and tight end Jake Ballard and defensive lineman Myron Pryor were placed on the reserve-PUP. Rookie offensive lineman Markus Zusevics was placed on the reserve-Non Football Injury list. The Patriots also claimed first-year WR Kerry Taylor off waivers from the Vikings.

New Orleans Saints: Beat the storm and made their cuts Monday, releasing veteran defensive tackle Remi Ayodele and quarterback Luke McCown. The Saints also waived the following players: Tight end Jake Byrne (who had a partially guaranteed contract), wide receivers Marques Clark, Kevin Hardy and Derek Moye, offensive linemen Hutch Eckerson, Paul Fenaroli and Brian Folkerts, defensive end Donavan Robinson, defensive tackle Swanson Miller, linebacker Aaron Tevis, cornerbacks Kamaal McIlwain and Cord Parks and safety Johnny Thomas (who had a partially guaranteed contract).

New York Giants: Reached the 75-man limit on Monday by placing tight end Travis Beckum and defensive tackle Chris Canty on reserve/PUP, placing offensive lineman Brandon Mosley on injured reserve, releasing cornerback Antwaun Molden and waiving tight end Ryan Purvis, defensive tackle Carlton Powell, defensive back Chris Horton, wide receiver Julian Talley, wide receiver Brandon Collins, tight end Christian Hopkins, defensive back Brandon Bing, defensive back Jojo Nicolas, running back Joe Martinek, tackle Joel Reinders and defensive tackle Oren Wilson.

New York Jets: Got down to 80 players on Saturday by cutting receiver Dexter Jackson, guard Terrence Campbell, long snapper Derek Chard, defensive tackle Matt Hardison, cornerback LeQuan Lewis, safety Marcus Lott, and receiver Raymond WebberCut to 74 Monday by dumping linebacker Ambrose Damario, receiver Stanley Aruke, receiver Wes Kemp, running back Jeremy Stewart, and kicker Josh Brown, and by waiving fullback/tight end Josh Baker with the “injured” designation.

Oakland Raiders: Made 12 moves Monday to get to the limit. They waived linebacker Korey Bosworth (nephew Brian) along with the following players: Defensive ends Mason Brodine and Wayne Dorsey, safeties Aaron Henry and Chaz Powell, cornerback Terrail Lambert, wide receivers Thomas Mayo and DeAundre Muhammad, quarterback Kyle Newhall-Caballero and fullback Manase Tonga. They also waived-injured fullback Rashawn Jackson and offensive lineman Ed Wang.

Pittsburgh SteelersMoved to 75 on Monday by releasing linebacker Ryan Baker, defensive tackle Mike Blanc, wide receiver Paul Cox, cornerback Andre Freeman, kicker Daniel Hrapmann, offensive lineman Kyle Jolly, long snapper Matt Katula, tight end Jamie McCoy, cornerback Walter McFadden, tight end Justin Peelle, safety Myron Rolle, wide receiver Juamorris Stewart, defensive tackle Kade Weston, and wide receiver Jimmy Young. Also waived linebacker Mortty Ivy with the “injured” designation.  (They’ve since reached an injury settlement with Ivy.)

Philadelphia EaglesCut to 80 on Saturday by releasing receiver Elvis Akpla, safety Wade Bonner, defensive end Xavier Brown, receiver Brian Hernandez (injured), receiver McKay Jacobson, receiver Tiger Jones, guard Alfred McCullough, safety Tom Nelson (injured), cornerback Kevin Thomas, and tackle Thomas Welch.  On Sunday, the Eagles moved to 79, by releasing former Oregon All-American cornerback Cliff Harris. They got down to 75 by placing tackle Jason Peters on the reserve/non-football injury list, defensive tackle Mike Patterson on the reserve/non-football illness list, guard Mike Gibson on injured reserve and waiving wide receiver Jamel Hamler.

San Diego Chargers: Released wide receiver Roscoe Parrish, placed guard Johnnie Troutman on reserve/non-football injury list, placed offensive lineman Brandyn Dombrowski on reserve/non-football illness list and waived wide receivers Jason Barnes, Taylor Embree and Phillip Payne, defensive tackle Eddie Brown, long snapper Nick Guess, running back Michael Hayes, tight end Brad Taylor and offensive tackle Phil Trautwein. The Chargers also reached injury settlements with defensive tackle Garrett Brown and tackle Michael Toudouze to get to 75 players.

San Francisco 49ers: Got to 75 players on Monday by placing linebacker Darius Fleming on the PUP list and running back Jewel Hampton on the reserve/non-football injury list. They also waived tackle Jason Slowey, running back Cameron Bell, linebacker Kourtnei Brown (injured), wide receiver Brian Tyms, safety Cory Nelms, wide receiver Joe Hastings (injured), wide receiver Ben Hannula, kicker Giorgio Tavecchio, defensive tackle Matt Masifilo, cornerback Deante’ Purvis , tight end Joe Sawyer and defensive tackle Patrick Butrym.

St. Louis Rams: Got down to 80 players on Monday by waiving defensive lineman John Gill, linebacker Noah Keller, fullback Todd Anderson, kicker Garrett Lindholm, running back Nicholas Schweiger, wide receiver Charles Gilbert, wide receiver Brandyn Harvey, offensive lineman Kevin Hughes, linebacker Alex Hoffman-Ellis and running back Calvin Middleton. The Rams got to 75 by waiving-injured wide receiver Danario Alexander, placing defensive tackle Trevor Laws on injured reserve and waiving tight end Brody Eldridge, offensive lineman Ryan McKee and long snapper Travis Tripucka.

Seattle Seahawks: Released on Sunday receiver Terrell Owens, guard Deuce Lutui, tackle Alex Barron, receiver Phil Bates, tackle Edawn Coughman, cornerback Donny Lisowski, cornerback Ron Parker, and running back Tyrell Sutton. Also waived the following players with the “injured” designation: linebacker Jameson Konz, defensive tackle Lazarius Levingston, cornerback Roy Lewis, and tight end Cameron Morrah.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers:   Reduced to 75 on Monday by waiving running back De’Anthony Curtis, long snapper Andrew DePaola, receiver Greg Ellingson, tight end Collin Franklin, receiver Ed Gant, punter Eric Guthrie, tackle Mike Ingersoll (injury settlement), linebacker Brian Smith, safety Tramain Thomas, and cornerback Marquese Wheaton.  Also placed guard Davin Joseph on injured reserve and shifted defensive end Da’Quan Bowers to reserve/PUP list.

Tennessee Titans: Got the to 75-man limit Sunday by placing receiver Marc Mariani on IR, safety Markelle Martin on reserve/PUP, and releasing the following players: running back Herb Donaldson, center William Vlachos, quarterback Nick Stephens, kicker Will Batson, tight end Joey Haynos, offensive linemen George Bias and Jonathan Palmer, safety Christian Scott, and receivers Chase Deadder, LaQuinton Evans, and Marcus Harris.

Washington Redskins: Kicker Neil Rackers was let go after losing kicking competition to Graham Gano.  The Redskins also released veteran offensive linemen Tony Moll and James Lee; waived running back Antwon Bailey, offensive lineman Chris Campbell, running back Lennon Creer, quarterback Jonathan Crompton, receiver Samuel Kirkland, linebacker Monte Lewis, guard Nick Martinez, and tight end Beau Reliford; waived receiver Lance Lewis with the injured designation; waived cornerback Morgan Trent with an injury settlement; traded cornerback Kevin Barnes to the Lions; and placed right tackle Jammal Brown on reserve/PUP.

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Tavon Wilson seeks to throw out suits against him

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Detroit Lions safety Tavon Wilson denies he punched a former girlfriend during an altercation last year, according to TMZ.

Per TMZ, Alanda Jackson, the mother of Wilson’s 3-year-old, has filed suit against Wilson, alleging that he broke her nose during the melee. Jackson got into a verbal altercation with Wilson’s current girlfriend at a nightclub in Washington, D.C., on May 14, 2016. Jackson accuses Wilson of grabbing her, throwing her to the ground and punching her in the face. Jackson said a female friend was stabbed by someone in Wilson’s entourage, and both women were hospitalized.

Jackson was arrested, TMZ reports, with Wilson’s current girlfriend, Simone Leach, claiming she was the victim. Jackson seeks more than $2.5 million, and Wilson also faces a suit from the other alleged victim. Wilson has asked a judge to dismiss both suits.

The Lions released a statement: “We are aware of the report regarding Tavon Wilson. We have spoken to Tavon, and we have also notified the league office of this matter. Due to the personal nature of this situation, we will have no additional comment at this time.”

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Archie Manning: Adam Gase reached out to Peyton after Ryan Tannehill was injured

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At a time when many are wondering whether recently-retired quarterbacks Tony Romo and Jay Cutler would return to the NFL if a starter gets injured during the upcoming season, it turns out that last year’s high-profile retiree had an opportunity to return, sort of.

Via Josh Katzenstein of the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Archie Manning said Friday that he saw last December a text-message exchange between his son, Peyton, and Dolphins coach Adam Gase.

“He said, ‘Hey 18, [Ryan] Tannehill went down,'” Archie said. “[Gase] said, ‘I think he’s going to miss some time. The first question I’m going to get at the press conference in the morning is if I’m going to try to bring you to Miami. What do you want me to tell them?'”

It’s a creative way for Gase, Peyton’s offensive coordinator in Denver, to ask Peyton whether he was interested without officially asking him whether he was interested. Regardless, Peyton wasn’t interested.

Said Archie: “The text message came back from Peyton, ‘You tell them I could probably come play, but there’s no way I can miss carpool the next two weeks.’ So, he was done.”

Peyton was done, and he still is done. But it’s fascinating to think what could have happened late last season, if Peyton Manning had swooped in to help a Dolphins team that lost to Pittsburgh in the wild-card round — and that with an upset there would have been destined for a trip to New England to face the Patriots.

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Lakers G.M. compares Lonzo Ball to NFL’s best quarterbacks

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Typically, new players who arrive in a given sport are compared to other great players from that same sport. For reasons neither obvious nor apparent, the General Manager of the L.A. Lakers has compared the team’s latest first-round draft pick to the two best quarterbacks in the NFL.

“In press conferences, I don’t like a lot of hyperbole and a whole bunch of words,” Rob Pelinka said regarding Lonzo Ball, via Rob Baxter of ESPN.com. “I like to tell stories. I think when this really into focus for us was, we knew the talent was transcendent. The way he passes the ball, you look at quarterbacks like Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers, that just have a gift. There’s clearly a gift, with what he’s been blessed with.”

Apart from the comparison being odd, Pelinka’s comments amount to a potential curse for a player who already will be counted on to return to relevance one of the proudest franchises in the NBA, and who enters pro sports with one of the most high-profile and universally disliked fathers in all of sport.

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Ezekiel Elliott, Dak Prescott not resting on their laurels

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Dak Prescott won 13 games and offensive rookie of the year honors. Ezekiel Elliott won the rushing title and earned six MVP votes as a rookie. Both were ranked among the top-14 players in the NFL Network’s poll of players.

But don’t think for a second that Prescott and Elliott have spent the offseason resting on their laurels. Instead, according to teammate Cole Beasley, Prescott and Elliott have worked harder than ever since the Cowboys fell short of their goals last season.

“Dak’s the type of guy, he could be the best in the world at his position, he’ll still come in here and not be satisfied or complacent,” Beasley said, via Jon Machota of the Dallas Morning News. “He’ll come in here and grind like he’s a rookie. He’s one of the hardest-working guys I’ve ever seen.

“Zeke’s approach is just like it was last year. Both of those guys have a chip on their shoulders. They’re not satisfied until we get to where we want to be. All the guys in here are the same way. Until we get a Super Bowl, we haven’t done our jobs.”

The Cowboys haven’t been to a Super Bowl since the 1995 season when they won the franchise’s fifth. They have not produced back-to-back winning seasons since 2008-09. Both are goals this season after a 13-3 regular season in 2016 ended in disappointment in the playoffs with a loss in the divisional round to Green Bay.

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Derek Carr wanted to leave money for teammates

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Raiders G.M. Reggie McKenzie now wants to sign some of quarterback Derek Carr’s teammates, and Carr wants to be sure McKenzie can.

“The main thing that I could just remember was all along the way, I was like, ‘How do we keep my teammates?’” Carr said at Friday’s press conference regarding his new deal, via Raiders.com. “That’s, I don’t know if it’s weird how it sounds, but that was just what I kept telling him. I was like, ‘OK. that’s cool. Yeah, that’s awesome, wow, cool. Is this good for Gabe [Jackson]? Is this good for Khalil [Mack]? Is this good for Amari [Cooper]?’ [Reggie] can tell you himself, these are things that I said to him numerous amounts of times. I didn’t want to hurt our team; that’s the last thing I would ever want to do. So, hopefully we didn’t That’s the last thing that I intended to do and that’s kind of why I was so involved.”

Few would call a deal that sets a record for new-money average team friendly, but if Carr had wanted to maximize his earnings he could have followed the Kirk Cousins path to a year-to-year haul that would have resulted in ridiculously high cap numbers, and that ultimately would have forced the Raiders to pay more than $25 million annually.

And while Carr hasn’t quite copied the Tom Brady playbook and taken considerably less than market value, Brady’s failure to push the envelope has indeed affected Carr, just as it will affect others. If Brady had decided to pursue maximum dollars, he’d be making more than $30 million per year by now, and other quarterbacks would see their own pay lifted by that dynamic. It’s a point that former NFL quarterback Brady Quinn made on Friday’s PFT Live, noting that the union likely isn’t thrilled by Tom Brady’s conscious failure to elevate the quarterback market.

For Carr, the question now becomes whether his teammates will be as charitable when it’s their turn to get paid, consciously taking less to help the team keep more players or saying, “Screw this. I only have so many years to make big money, and I’m going to.”

With limited years in a playing career, no equity, and likely orthopedic and cognitive problems later in life, players have every right to seek every last dollar, forcing teams to navigate the cap and to make good decisions through the draft, which under the current compensation rules allows teams to load up the roster with young, talented, and cheap labor, year in and year out.

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Packers spend offseason working on defending the pass

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The Packers concentrated on the passing game — and defending the pass — during 11-on-11 work during the offseason. Mike McCarthy had reasons for reducing the number of run calls.

The Packers coach insists run calls in no-pads practices create unrealistic looks, leading to linemen and running backs developing bad habits. The emphasis on the passing game served a second purpose in giving the defensive backs more work as defensive coordinator Dom Capers spent the offseason preaching improved coverage.

“We’ve really focused on the pass,” McCarthy said, via Pete Dougherty of USA Today Network.

The Packers have three new players expected to upgrade their secondary. They brought back cornerback Davon House in free agency and drafted cornerback Kevin King and safety/linebacker Josh Jones with their first two picks.

The Packers ranked 22nd in total defense last season, including 31st against the pass, so it’s obvious why Green Bay made changes in both personnel and practice plans.

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Andy Reid could move into the NFL’s Top 5 in coaching wins

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Andy Reid isn’t usually named among the great coaches in NFL history, but perhaps he will be by the time he serves out his newly extended contract.

The Chiefs and Reid have just agreed on a new five-year contract, and if the 59-year-old Reid coaches five more years at the 11-wins-a-year pace he’s been on in Kansas City, he’d move into fifth place all-time in career wins.

Reid is currently tied with Jeff Fisher for 11th on the career wins list, with 173. He needs 13 wins to tie Chuck Knox and move into 10th place. If he won 55 more games, averaging 11 a year for five years, he’d have 228 career wins, which would put him fifth all-time behind Don Shula, George Halas, Tom Landry and Bill Belichick.

That would put Reid into Hall of Fame consideration, even without a Super Bowl win. Although fans often think of the best coaches as the ones who have Super Bowl rings, the Hall of Fame selection committee doesn’t necessarily see it that way. Several coaches have made it to the Hall of Fame without winning a Super Bowl, including George Allen, Bud Grant and Marv Levy. With five more good years, Reid would have as good a resume as those three Hall of Fame coaches.

Reid, of course, is much more focused on winning a Super Bowl. If he does that in his remaining time in Kansas City, that would likely punch his ticket to Canton.

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Prosecutors appeal decision to void Aaron Hernandez murder conviction

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When Aaron Hernandez killed himself in prison earlier this year, he was still appealing his conviction for the murder of Odin Lloyd and that led a Massachusetts judge to void the conviction under the legal principle known as abatement ab initio.

That principle holds that a conviction can’t be finalized until the appeals process has been exhausted and resets the case to the beginning in the event of the defendant’s death. Prosecutors argued that doing so would reward Hernandez for killing himself and they are now appealing the judge’s decision to void the conviction.

Bristol District Attorney Thomas Quinn III called abatement ab initio “archaic” and noted that many other states have moved away from it to allow appeals to continue even after the defendant has died.

“A defendant who commits suicide should not be able to manipulate the outcome of his post-conviction proceedings to achieve in death what he would not be able to achieve in life,” Quinn said, via the Associated Press.

Hernandez killed himself shortly after being acquitted by a jury of two other murder charges.

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Michael Bidwill has concerns about having NFL team based in UK

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Cardinals President Michael Bidwill expresses doubt the NFL will have a team based in the UK in the near future. Bidwill, in London this week assessing facilities at Wembley and Twickenham ahead of the NFL’s games there this season, told Sky Sports News HQ that the league will “continue to study it, but I don’t think there’s any timeline out there.”

For the 10th consecutive season, the NFL will play games in London. The Cardinals will play the Rams at Twickenham on Oct. 22, while the Vikings face the Browns there on Oct. 29. Wembley will host the Ravens and Jaguars on Sept. 24 and the Dolphins and Saints on Oct. 1.

But scheduling teams to play one game in the UK obviously is much different than having a team based there.

“We’re getting a lot of support for the NFL over here, but I think one of the big things is going to be the travel; the different time zones and how it might impact the athletes playing here and traveling to play here,” Bidwill said, via Sophie Morris of Sky Sports News HQ. “One of the things we really care about is our players’ health. We want to see how this is going to impact the athlete and we want to make sure that there is no competitive imbalance.”

Patriots owner Robert Kraft appears more optimistic, insisting the NFL will have a team in London. It is a prediction he has made for several years now.

“Now we play four games a year in London and sell tickets to 80,000 people and we’re going to have a team in London,” Kraft said, speaking at Cannes Lions as part of an interview with WPP Group CEO Martin Sorrell via the New York Post. “We’re playing the Raiders in Mexico and have plans to play in Germany, Canada and Brazil and China. I don’t know why not France?”

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Derek Carr wants to splurge at Chick-fil-A

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Derek Carr should seek a marketing deal with Chick-fil-A. He gave the fast-food restaurant a shoutout Friday during a press conference officially to announce his new deal with the Raiders, getting it plenty of free publicity.

Carr’s five-year, $125 million deal makes him the highest-paid player in NFL history, prompting a question about where the quarterback will spend his newfound riches.

“Chick-fil-A,” Carr answered to laughter. “Probably Chick-fil-A. I’ve been eating clean. I’ll probably get some Chick-fil-A.”

Carr actually has big plans to use some of the money for the greater good. He said he will continue to tithe, something he has done since college, and hopes to help the less fortunate.

“The exciting thing for me money-wise, honestly, is this money’s going to help a lot of people,” Carr said. “I’m very thankful to have it, that it’s in our hands, because it’s going to help people not only in this country but in a lot of countries around the world. That’s what’s exciting for me.”

He does have one important shopping trip ahead.

“I’ll probably give my wife something nice, even though she begs me not to,” Carr said.

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Federal appeals court seems to accept evidence of CTE in living patients

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One of the most widely-accepted realities of Chronic Traumatic Encephelopathy has been undermined by one of the highest courts in the United States.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, one of various appellate courts that sit one step below the Supreme Court, has ruled in a case involving former NFL linebacker Jesse Solomon that the joint NFL-NFL Players Association Disability Plan abused its discretion in denying Solomon’s claim for disability benefits. In so doing, the court seemed to accept the notion that Solomon, who was involved in 69,000 high-speed collisions while playing football, has “CTE-related disability” and “CTE injuries.”

While hardly a medical finding that CTE can indeed be diagnosed without examining the brain tissue of a deceased patient, the court’s 13-page ruling seems to accept as a given the notion that CTE can be diagnosed based on a combination of MRIs and an assessment of symptoms.

It’s possible that those observations slipped in to the final written decision because the lawyers representing the Plan didn’t sufficiently focus on that point in written materials or while arguing the case in the courtroom. As to the former, it’s possible the lawyers regarded the inability to firmly diagnose CTE in living patients as a given. As to the latter, and based on a press release issued by Solomon’s lawyers, it’s possible the lawyers were too busy taking flak from judges to quibble with medical and scientific niceties.

“Why is the Plan fighting him so incredibly hard?” Judge Dennis Shedd said. “And when he makes the claim through your own doctor that he’s got a problem? . . .  Why in the world would you – I guess current players don’t want money to come out for past players, or something? . . . Why in the world would any player playing professional football . . . look at this and go, ‘This is one heck of a great deal for players.’ We play as hard as we can, give everything we got, get banged up — I saw something in the record [about] 69,000 tackles, that’s incredible.  We do all we can, and then we apply and when doctors say I have a problem based on those hits, and they say, ‘You’re not orthopedically disabled, go away.’ . . .

“[S]omebody ought to scratch their head and say, Does this really look good?  We don’t have much of a legal argument, but we’re willing to fight it to the death to deny somebody . . . Does that make sense to you? . . . Do you think that looks good to players, what’s going on in this courtroom today?  It’s not necessarily part of the determination, I’m just asking a real-world question.”

The real-world outcome is that Solomon will receive disability benefits, because the panel unanimously concluded that the Plan “relied on no evidence at all” in rejecting Solomon’s claim. It’s a stunning observation given the supposed sensitivity to brain injuries. Perhaps more importantly, the ease with which the judges seemed to agree that Solomon proved that he has CTE while still alive raises renewed questions about whether the massive concussion settlement should have allowed players to secure benefits if they can sufficiently prove that they suffer from CTE.

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Vikings hire new strength and conditioning coach

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The Vikings were left with an open slot on their coaching staff earlier this month when strength and conditioning coach Brent Salazar left the team in order to work for the United States Tennis Association.

They filled it on Friday. The team announced that Mark Uyeyama will be heading up the strength and conditioning department for the 2017 season.

Uyeyama spent the last nine years working for the 49ers under a succession of different head coaches before being dismissed upon Kyle Shanahan’s arrival in Santa Clara. He worked at Utah State before making the move to the 49ers in 2008.

Barring any other unexpected shifts from the gridiron to other pursuits, that should be the final change to Mike Zimmer’s staff before the 2017 season.

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Bronson Kaufusi ready to contribute after missing rookie season

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The Ravens drafted defensive end Bronson Kaufusi in the third round last season, but they have yet to see him on the field. Kaufusi broke his left ankle early in training camp and missed all of last season rehabbing.

“Injuries are always frustrating, but you also have to look for the silver lining in it,” Kaufusi said, via the team website. “So, for me, it was a chance to learn, grow and take everything in that I could so I could be ready for this upcoming year.”

Kaufusi, now fully healed, took some first-team reps during offseason practices in his bid to replace Lawrence Guy, who left in free agency. Veteran Brent Urban remains the favorite to win the starting job, but Kaufusi will compete with Urban and rookie Chris Wormley for playing time at the position.

“I want to make a difference,” Kaufusi said. “No matter where it is on the field, I want to get out there and make plays for our team, for our defense and just contribute.”

The Ravens drafted Kaufusi for his pass-rush ability. He had 11 sacks in his senior season at BYU and 26.5 for his four-year career.

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Maliek Collins wants to be next great DT in Rod Marinelli’s system

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With Dak Prescott and Ezekiel Elliott in the same draft class, Maliek Collins got overshadowed and overlooked. But the defensive tackle quietly had a successful rookie season, which has defensive coordinator Rod Marinelli excited about Collins’ future.

Collins’ 656 snaps — 61.9 percent of the defensive plays — were the most of any Cowboys defensive lineman. In fact, among the team’s defenders, only linebacker Sean Lee and four defensive backs received more. Collins, a third-round pick in 2016, made 31 tackles, five sacks and 14 quarterback pressures last season.

Collins, though, expected more and wants more.

I never meet my own goals,” Collins said, via the team website. “My goal is to be the best player I can be so that I always keep improving. That’s how I set my goals. I don’t really do it statistically. Then you’re out there chasing stats. The goal is to improve every day. If I’m not improving every day, then I’m doing something wrong.”

Collins plays the three-technique, one of the most important positions in Marinelli’s scheme. Hall of Famer Warren Sapp manned that position for Marinelli in Tampa Bay. Collins has studied some the best three-techniques ever, including Sapp, in hopes of becoming the next great one.

“The standards are basically written,” Collins said. “Me being a three-technique, the standards are in the history books of what three-techniques have done in this system. I like to say that’s the standard. The people like John Randle, guys like Warren Sapp or [Keith] Millard, who started the system. [Anthony] McFarland, those types of players.”

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With Derek Carr signed, Reggie McKenzie moving on to other extensions

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At the start of a Friday press conference to discuss quarterback Derek Carr’s contract extension, General Manager Reggie McKenzie called it a “big day” for the organization.

McKenzie also said that he’s now going to turn his attention toward more big days and big extensions in the future. Carr said during his opening remarks that it was important for him to “structure [his deal] in a way to help the Raiders” hold onto other players and McKenzie said that the contract accomplished that. 

“The bottom line is we’re able to continue to move forward to be to keep all the players that we need to keep in the correct timing,” McKenzie said. “This affords us to do that. We’ll start on that ASAP.”

Defensive end Khalil Mack and right guard Gabe Jackson, both of whom joined Carr in the 2014 draft class, are expected to be the next two players up for extensions in Oakland. The team picked up Mack’s option for the 2018 season and Jackson is set for free agency if he can’t agree on a deal before the start of the next league year.

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