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Dez Bryant rules could violate CBA, in two ways

Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant is all smiles before playing the San Diego Chargers in their pre-season NFL football game in San Diego Reuters

The fact that Cowboys receiver Dez Bryant apparently agrees with the rules that the team has imposed upon him creates the impression that the rules give rise to no potential problems.

We’re not so sure about that one.

The practice of placing individual restrictions on a player’s movements and activities away from the field sets a dangerous precedent, the kind of precedent that the NFLPA may not want to set.  (We’ve contacted the union for its position on what we’ll call until we come up with something better the Rules of 88.)

None of it is football related.  A nightly midnight curfew.  No strip clubs.  An approved list of night clubs.  A rotating three-man security team.  While a team has limited ability to take action if a player gets into trouble away from work, there’s nothing in the CBA that allows a team to impose such proactive measures.

Then there’s the fact that having a full-time security detail could give rise to salary-cap issues, given that folks providing security won’t be doing it for free.  (We’ve contacted the league for its position on this specific aspect of the Rules of 88.)

So while Bryant has plenty of reasons to submit to these rules at the request of the Cowboys, the Cowboys arguably shouldn’t have asked.  And if the Cowboys are paying for the security team, the value of that service probably should count toward Bryant’s total cap number for 2012.

Then there’s the fact that it may not be effective.  The last time the Cowboys tried the full-time babysitter approach, with cornerback Pacman Jones, Jones got into a fight with a member of his security detail, prompting another suspension.

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53 Responses to “Dez Bryant rules could violate CBA, in two ways”
  1. pwndabeer says: Aug 27, 2012 10:17 AM

    the amount of money it would take to keep him in check would far surpass the amount of money they are actually paying him to play football.

    jerry jones needs to get his finger out of his nose and just cut the DB (ooooh you like that? a play on an acronym!)

  2. voiceofreasonsays says: Aug 27, 2012 10:22 AM

    Dez Bryant catches charges.

    Dez Briscoe catches Touchdowns.

    Will the real Dez please stand up!

  3. popdawg99 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:25 AM

    “So while Bryant has plenty of reasons to submit to these rules at the request of the Cowboys, the Cowboys arguably shouldn’t have asked.”

    Right, they should have just allowed an asset with high potential to self-destruct.

  4. macwomack says: Aug 27, 2012 10:27 AM

    Thanks for following up on the cap issue that was my original thought — how can something of value be provided to the player and not count against the cap?

    If this is allowed to stand the next thing teams will be doing is offering team provided cars, phones, houses, etc.

  5. macwomack says: Aug 27, 2012 10:27 AM

    It’s all enough to make Mara’s head explode…

  6. samoanjungle says: Aug 27, 2012 10:29 AM

    Just have him move into one of Jerry’s spare bedrooms and hire a Nanny.

  7. demolition510 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:32 AM

    It violates being a man. But then again, maybe he admits he isn’t man enough to be responsible.

  8. pesh00 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:34 AM

    Dude goes out and goes beastmode (as he should) for 80+ catches, 1200+ yds, 9+ tds…..then JJ will make that money back in a week.

  9. righton989 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:35 AM

    That’s exactly what the NFL and this country does not need…another know-nothing, do-nothing, create-nothing but nitpick everything lawyer.

  10. mogogo1 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:38 AM

    “Then there’s the fact that having a full-time security detail could give rise to salary-cap issues, given that folks providing security won’t be doing it for free.”
    __________________

    There’s no league salary cap on security personnel, so you can stop worrying, Mike. All jokes aside, this is a strange argument. If the security detail is “rotating” that implies it is existing security personnel taking a turn watching Bryant. How would that be any different than having a trainer or coach who spent the majority of their time working with a specific player? Answer: It wouldn’t, so there’s no salary cap implications to this whatsoever.

  11. fissels says: Aug 27, 2012 10:39 AM

    None of these rules will work unless Dez undergoes some serious soul searching and soul changing. If Dez doesn’t buy into why his behavior needs to change, he probably will fail anyway

  12. prrbrr says: Aug 27, 2012 10:39 AM

    Jerry knew this when he picked him. I love the thought that he’s giving Jerry heartburn.

  13. racerx2k11 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:42 AM

    Does medical treatment for a player count towards the salary cap? Gatorade? How can you suggest that security for a player be counted against the salary cap (it’s not part of Dez’s salary) and not count every cup of Gatorade or every uniform that gets damaged in play against the salary cap?

  14. prince5000 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:43 AM

    when a player with top 5 talent free falls in the draft only because of character issues – i’m starting to think these teams who investigate and make that decision know what they are doing.

    and the last sentence about Pacman getting into a fight with his security is freaking hilarious.

  15. mikeyhigs says: Aug 27, 2012 10:43 AM

    Dez-construction Rules
    Dezconstruction of Dez

  16. zaggs says: Aug 27, 2012 10:43 AM

    “there’s nothing in the CBA that allows a team to impose such proactive measures.”

    so what you’re saying is there is nothing in the CBA that forbids it? If there is nothing in the CBA that forbids it, and there is not the player version of the US constitutions federal supremacy clause, then its allowed.
    No having a security detail would not violate the salary cap. Thats like saying that a surgery performed by the teams doctor violates the salary cap.

  17. mikeyhigs says: Aug 27, 2012 10:44 AM

    Dezurrection

  18. cowboys5x says: Aug 27, 2012 10:44 AM

    break out season for dez. i think all young players need this type of actions and support. coming from a home front that he did i guess not much guidance. i agree good job jerry

  19. cwwgk says: Aug 27, 2012 10:45 AM

    If the NFLPA doesn’t take action on behalf of Bryant it will redefine the word hypocrisy. As well intentioned as the Cowboys may be, these restrictions are blatant violations of the CBA. In addition, the union has tried to play the due process card all summer regarding the bountygate suspensions; despite the fact the doctrine is irrelevant since the NFL is a private organization.

    Nonetheless, and accepting the NFLPA’s erroneous view of due process, these limitations categorically violate Dez Bryant’s constitutional rights of liberty and peaceful assembly.

    The union has dug its heels in the sand on behalf of a popular cause: Vilma, Hargrove, etc. Should the NFLPA bury its head in the sand and allow Bryant’s restrictions to be implemented unchecked it will cement its reputation as all style and scarcely any substance.

  20. mikeyhigs says: Aug 27, 2012 10:45 AM

    I know. those ideas suck. But the Rules of 88 sucks too

  21. daknight93 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:47 AM

    At least Jerry really care for his players to go to extent to help him as much as possible…this is Dez’s last chance and if messes this up..he is out of Dallas.

  22. cballlv11 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:47 AM

    I think it’s pretty weak the you feel the need to be the tattle-tale for every NFL issue. Heaven forbid that a team try to keep one of their players out of trouble.. It might violate the salary cap? You’ve contacted the league about that…Really?

  23. rubbernilly says: Aug 27, 2012 10:52 AM

    Nothing wrong with the Cowboys organization asking for Dez to accept the measures… especially when that allows Dez to keep his job. Nothing different between that and an organization asking a player to take a pay cut so that they don’t have to cut him.

    As for the potential violation of Cap Rules, I think the Cowboys are on thin ice. It’s only a matter of whether the League will enforce the rules or look the other way.

    At to the poster who thought that counting the tab for this detail under the salary cap means that we’d have to count every gatorade, medical test, or torn uniform under the salary cap, there are two huge differences:
    1) those other things are fairly standardized and equal across the league, ie, available to all players, and
    2) those other things are football-related.

    The comparison is laughable.

  24. bigbluedeadhead says: Aug 27, 2012 10:54 AM

    Insane — after running this program on Pacman and experiencing those results Jerruh decides it’s a great idea to run the same program on Dez? [Brilliant!]

    And yeah, [“the Rules of 88″ has a real ring to it]. [Really rolls right off the tongue].

    Just call them “Dez’s rules” — no need to come up with an awful nickname from them.

  25. eventhorizon04 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:55 AM

    “If the security detail is “rotating” that implies it is existing security personnel taking a turn watching Bryant. How would that be any different than having a trainer or coach who spent the majority of their time working with a specific player? Answer: It wouldn’t, so there’s no salary cap implications to this whatsoever.”

    Better answer: There’s a difference between a trainer working at the Cowboys facility versus a trainer that works at a player’s house full-time. Likewise, there’s a difference between security personnel who work at the team’s facility and follow the team to away games versus a 3-man security team who follows a player to his home, to his grocery store, and to his list of approved nightclubs.

    It’s the difference between a service being given team-wide versus a service being dedicated to one person.

  26. Patriot42 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:56 AM

    Jones needs some therapy as he continually signs players with morale issues.

  27. eventhorizon04 says: Aug 27, 2012 10:58 AM

    “Does medical treatment for a player count towards the salary cap? Gatorade? How can you suggest that security for a player be counted against the salary cap (it’s not part of Dez’s salary) and not count every cup of Gatorade or every uniform that gets damaged in play against the salary cap?”

    It’s not complicated. If a team physician offers medical treatment to all players, it shouldn’t count towards the salary cap.

    If a physician is hired, full-time, to ONLY TREAT ONE PLAYER, then it’s a service to one player (not the team), and should count against the salary cap.

    This security team would not be available to Demarcus Ware or Tony Romo – it’s a 3-man team protecting Dez full-time.

  28. biggiesmallsthecondomfilla says: Aug 27, 2012 10:59 AM

    Dez, just stay home and throw the keys to lil cease…..

  29. willyalistentothis says: Aug 27, 2012 11:03 AM

    It seems that Jerry Jones has gotten into the gladiator business. Rumor has it that he is going to build a barrick to house Bryant outside of his neat new stadium and let him out only to train and perform. October 1st against the Bears should be a huge test.

  30. bluebongzilla says: Aug 27, 2012 11:06 AM

    The NFLPA has no grievance if Bryant is submitting himself to this willfully. As far as the salary cap is concerned, players get help all the time, paid for by the team itself or through the NFL’s offices and it does not and should not count against the salary cap because it’s not part of his salary… technically, it’s a benefit. The CBA specifically excludes benefits from what can be considered “salary”. The CBA also specifically defines “benefits” and while it does not specifically include babysitters, it didn’t create a salary cap problem with Pacman so it shouldn’t here, either. It’s something that is designed in part to help Bryant continue to pay union dues and sell jerseys. Just sayin’.

    Article 13; Section 4. Definition of “salary”:
    (a) “Salary” means the compensation in money, property, investments, loans, or anything else of value to which an NFL player or his Player Affiliate is entitled in accordance with a Player Contract, excluding benefits.

  31. omniscient48 says: Aug 27, 2012 11:10 AM

    Prince Harry will be in charge of the Dez Bryant security detail.

  32. bluebongzilla says: Aug 27, 2012 11:17 AM

    “If a physician is hired, full-time, to ONLY TREAT ONE PLAYER, then it’s a service to one player (not the team), and should count against the salary cap.

    This security team would not be available to Demarcus Ware or Tony Romo – it’s a 3-man team protecting Dez full-time.”

    It would be available to them if they needed it. Why would you think otherwise? And why would a team hire a full-time Dr. for just one guy when they can just call and make an appointment with basically any doctor they want, whenever they need to and have it covered by excellent, league-provided medical insurance?

  33. apm says: Aug 27, 2012 11:28 AM

    Fun episode of Who Wants to be a Labor Lawyer?

  34. somekat says: Aug 27, 2012 11:43 AM

    Anyone who compares things like medical care, and “gatorade” to a personal security detail, is too stupid to be using my oxygen, please stop.

    You can’t play football hurt. You can’t play football dehydrated. Having a security team follow him around because he is a moron that can’t handle himself in public is not the same thing. If it doesn’t come out of his salary, it should count against the teams cap

  35. rg3enoughsaid says: Aug 27, 2012 11:53 AM

    lol.. rotating 3 man security team…classic. pretty good draft pick. I guess they got the pac man jones babysitter club back together

  36. diamondmo33 says: Aug 27, 2012 12:14 PM

    They should just cut this clown and be done with it.

  37. lambeaurules says: Aug 27, 2012 12:15 PM

    As absolutely much as I HATE HATE HATE Jerry Jones, I have to give him proper ups on this one. He is trying to make a positive difference in Bryants life and teach him how to be a better person, let the past be in the past and become a real “Professional Athlete” that kids can look up to. For that I tip my hat to Jones. I dont believe the NFL, NFLPA, or any other business or corporation should EVER look at these services and rules imposed in a monetary sense. First off, IF all goes to plan, they all stand to make a good amount of $$$ off Bryant in years to come. Secondly and most importantly, they are interfering with a process that could change Dez’ life for the better and who are they to play God if Jones is willing to foot the bill!? Some things are morally right to do, and I believe getting the structure in place so that Dez has a chance at becoming a truly good, well rounded representative of the NFL and the Dallas Cowboys is one of those things. Potentially fining, suspending, or penalizing the Cowboys and/or Jerry Jones for giving this kid a shot is not only wrong, it is immoral. And for the record, I am absolutely NOT a Cowboys fan….. The Packers are the true “Americas Team”! (that ought to ruffle some feathers…. :)

  38. coachglove says: Aug 27, 2012 12:17 PM

    1) All NFL teams have team security. Owners can tell those security people to do whatever they please and the size of the staff isn’t limited except by the budget the team wishes to spend.

    2) Because most contracts cannot possibly cover every single possible contingency, it is just as valid to say that this move isn’t expressly prohibited by the CBA, therefore it is allowed.

    3) Players are arguably given MUCH of value by teams (car service to avoid DUIs comes to mind) that isn’t counted towards the cap.

  39. tmac4454 says: Aug 27, 2012 12:18 PM

    Dez is a bum!!!!

  40. mjkelly77 says: Aug 27, 2012 12:34 PM

    Or such a miscreant player can be left to his own accord. Undoubtedly at some point he’ll violate the rules of propriety per his team and the NFL and be out on the street. I’m sure he can find suitable employment as a busboy somewhere.

    The alternative is to allow a team to be proactive, providing support to keep these players on the staight and narrow. Good behavior hopefully will become habit for them. This type of support should be encouraged by not only the NFL but also the NFLPA. The Commissioner just wants to save the players from themselves while he saves the game of football.

  41. purpleguy says: Aug 27, 2012 12:42 PM

    It’s hard to find fault with the Cowboys for the Dez security detail. The fault lies in drafting the guy in the first place. Seriously, how bad and misguided is a guy if he requires 24/7 security to stay out of trouble? Basic character flaws like these aren’t something cured with a Dale Carnagie self-help course and babysitters.

  42. geo1113 says: Aug 27, 2012 12:43 PM

    The addition to the salary cap of the security team makes no sense to me. The security team puts no money in Bryant’s pocket (although it may help him from spending his money frivilously). The security team is to protect the team’s investment in the player. It is to keep the player available for football.

  43. mactimo says: Aug 27, 2012 12:45 PM

    Dezaster

  44. dallascowboysdishingthereal says: Aug 27, 2012 12:52 PM

    It’s a shame that it has come to this. But if they leave Dez alone to do his own thing, he will not be in the NFL and stands to lose a great deal of money. It’s really for his own good in the long run. But still a shame.

  45. flyersgoalscoredby88 says: Aug 27, 2012 12:58 PM

    I hate the Cowboys as much as anyone, and I think Dez Bryant has his flaws, but comparing him to Pacman Jones? That’s not fair at all.

  46. thraiderskin says: Aug 27, 2012 1:11 PM

    The NFLPA can have all the issue in the world with these rules/actions, but I promise you, they would have a bigger issue with Dez not having employment. Some of you are knocking the Boys, but they are doing all in their power to keep thier star on the field and out of the doghouse, I call that dedication.

  47. phillipalpha says: Aug 27, 2012 1:20 PM

    Hilarous attempt to make a mountain out of a molehill, Dez Bryant cannot be forced to accept these things, he could just say he didnt want it, forcing Mr Jones to go with it, or cut him.

    But apparently Dez agreed on taking these steps, thus there is absolutely no problem with this.

  48. bobgriffinforthewin says: Aug 27, 2012 1:23 PM

    The security detail is not there for his protection, they are there for everyone around him to be protected, like his mom…HTTR

  49. al40110 says: Aug 27, 2012 1:37 PM

    Mike is right. How dare a team try to protect it’s assets. Who are the Cowboys (or any team) think they are . What right do they have to try an protect/help a player, even if that player knows he needs help. This is crazy. The Cowboys are trying to hekp Dez, he agrees with the action, and Mike is complaining. Talk about big egos.

  50. raylewis52 says: Aug 27, 2012 1:39 PM

    Am I the only one who finds the fact he needs rules in the first place so amazingly pathetic ? I’m tired of these “He’s a kid and he was stupid” excuses. You’re a supposed to be a grown man playing a grown mans game. Or maybe I’m just not being logical…

  51. clssylssy says: Aug 27, 2012 2:54 PM

    How about getting him some professional help in the way of therapy to evaluate and change his high risk behavior? If he’s not ameanable to treatment then cut him and move on. A lot of talented players come from poor backgrounds and appreciate the opportunity to make the most of their natural athletic gifts but continue to be surrounded by negative influences in the form of the environment they grew up in and need help in individuating. They have to make the choices and all the babysitting in the world is counterproductive. Plus therapy probably is covered under their health insurance…seems like a no brainer!

  52. jjthesportsguy says: Aug 27, 2012 3:04 PM

    What you fail to realize, is that as long as Dez Bryant agrees to it…it does not violate the CBA in his particular situation.

  53. redmomster says: Aug 27, 2012 5:31 PM

    I don’t think you can save someone from themself.

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