Skip to content

Jets assistant: Games don’t make me nervous after a drug dealer wanted to kill me

Karl Dunbar AP

Today’s most unusual NFL feature comes from the Newark Star-Ledger, which profiles Jets defensive line coach Karl Dunbar, who has revealed that in 1991, just after he finished his rookie season with the Steelers, he posed as a crack user to help the police department in his hometown bring down a drug dealer — who then ordered a hit on Dunbar.

Dunbar was a local football star in Opelousas, Louisiana, and he was able to gain the trust of a drug dealer the police had been targeting, which successfully led to his imprisonment.

“They thought that football players were guys who smoked a lot of drugs and had a lot of money,” Dunbar said. “I gave him the money, and I took the stuff. He bought into the whole thing.”

That was all good for the police department, but the problem was that the drug dealer was able to put a price on Dunbar’s head from his jail cell. That led to Dunbar needing police protection, but Dunbar enjoyed working with the police so much that he became a full-time officer after his playing career ended.

Dunbar worked in policing for only a couple years before going into coaching, but he said his time working with the police makes him more confident as a coach.

“To me, when you go through a situation in your head and the things you’ve been through in your mind come to fruition, why should you be nervous?” Dunbar said. “You’ve already been there.”

As the Jets head into Heinz Field today, Dunbar can feel confident knowing he’s survived in a much more hostile environment.

Permalink 13 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Home, New York Jets, Rumor Mill
13 Responses to “Jets assistant: Games don’t make me nervous after a drug dealer wanted to kill me”
  1. nyj69 says: Sep 16, 2012 10:23 AM

    Before somebody asks, yes, he has vitiligo. Read up on his story a bit if you’re not familiar with it, pretty interesting stuff.

  2. wayne1693 says: Sep 16, 2012 10:26 AM

    Should PFT have another Blotter-Board for civic-minded NFL Players: Number of Days Working Under-Cover for Police/FBI/CIA/EPA/DEA…?

  3. jmclarkent says: Sep 16, 2012 10:34 AM

    It takes a brave fella to put himself out there in dangerous waters for the sake of his community. Well played, sir!

  4. ravenator says: Sep 16, 2012 10:42 AM

    Drugs are bad, mmkay

  5. tannethrill says: Sep 16, 2012 10:48 AM

    Call me crazy but it sounds like his initial interaction with the police was more along the lines of cooperating when faced with charges. I don’t know of many people that just pose as users for the cops for the heck of it. Especially in your home town where you have friends and family.

    Granted I’m sure he has no record since he eventually became a cop but the beginning of the story sounds like he was trying to avoid prosecution for god knows what.

  6. loutibbs says: Sep 16, 2012 10:56 AM

    Narc!

  7. nypd1056 says: Sep 16, 2012 10:57 AM

    Hey wayne, your such a big mouth and critic of this man, why dont you go down to your local Law Inforcement agency and volunteer to go under cover and help the Police with a drug bust. Oh wait that could be dangerous, I could get hurt. My HERO all mouth.

  8. meytonpanning says: Sep 16, 2012 11:12 AM

    A Narc? Are you kidding me? The guy was selling crack; he deserves a jail cell. If anyone else broke the law (including any of you) they’d also be in a cell.

    I’ve lost every single friend I had to drugs (mostly speed, ecstacy and cocaine) and I can’t stand the thought of people who are willing to make a profit at the cost of other people’s lives.

  9. joeypickles says: Sep 16, 2012 11:18 AM

    It’s nice to see the words football, drugs, and police in a story that doesn’t involve a crime.

    There is no way this guy became a cop if he was caught with possession or dealing in his past…record or not.

    Police departments screen for that stuff, as in back ground checks and things like that.

  10. jacksaysfu says: Sep 16, 2012 11:44 AM

    This guy got busted for something himself & to avoid cooperation he snitched & became a C.I. , what a hero (sarcasm)

  11. thestrategyexpert says: Sep 16, 2012 12:54 PM

    It would be nice if we had a President that cared about cracking down on crime too.

  12. footballer4ever says: Sep 16, 2012 1:03 PM

    tannethrill
    Sep 16, 2012, 10:48 AM EDT
    Call me crazy but it sounds like his initial interaction with the police was more along the lines of cooperating when faced with charges. I don’t know of many people that just pose as users for the cops for the heck of it.
    _________________________________
    someone chewed you out for pointing this out, but this scenario sure makes sense. In the end, giving someone from a pro-league a “pass” to catch a crook instead could be a win-win situation in the end for any police officer. That is not a far-fetched scenario either.

  13. larryboodry says: Sep 16, 2012 4:25 PM

    Those of you knocking him for being a narc, or insisting he ‘must have done something wrong’ are missing the point…Karl Dunbar risked his life to bring down a drug dealer, then went on to be a productive member of society. If – and I agree, this seems likely – he did so wipe out some youthful crime he committed, so what? Would you prefer he did time (thus losing his bright future) while the dealer remained free to ruin more lives?

    Yeah, ’cause God forbid 21 years later some folks on a blog might label this good man a snitch or a narc.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!