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Coaches adjusting to lack of downfield flags

Broncos Falcons Football AP

With the replacement officials not flagging illegal contact (after all, the penalty doesn’t even exist at the lower levels of the sport), a league source tells PFT that coaches are telling defenders to hold as much as they can, until the officials call it.

Likewise, coaches are telling receivers to retaliate, pushing off until it’s called.  (Of course, it was called on Sunday against the Ravens and receiver Jacoby Jones, in a key moment.)  As a result, players are seeing a real difference in the game.

Rams receiver Danny Amendola, while stopping short of claiming that the coaches in St. Louis are telling the players to take advantage of the differences in enforcement, said during PFT Live that the players are making the adjustment on their own.  However, Amendola said he likes the different dynamic — as those 15 catches on Sunday would tend to prove.

For more from Amendola, who is generating plenty of attention as he approaches unrestricted free agency, here he is on PFT Live.

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18 Responses to “Coaches adjusting to lack of downfield flags”
  1. Mr. Wright 212 says: Sep 18, 2012 8:34 PM

    Coach Coughlin needs to keep telling the guys to do what they’ve been doing. It will pay off later, as the Giants aren’t a team that holds (hell, Fewell runs so much off man/soft zone how CAN they hold?) and have been held more than anyone (Nicks, Cruz and Hixon — when he was in there — were mugged all game vs. TB).

  2. dmartin17 says: Sep 18, 2012 8:40 PM

    Wow what news! Teams and players adjusting to how a game is called!

    Here is all you need to know about the “real” officials: Mike Perria said that a key holding call on the pat’s gronkowski was indeed a holding but he expects his crews not to call it, not in that situation.

    Awesome! Very NBA like to allow the situation to dictate your calls! Truly fair and just officiating! Let’s hurry to bring that back!!

  3. csilojohnson says: Sep 18, 2012 8:49 PM

    I like the no calls. They just need to be more consistent. Stop listening to the fans, coaches and players. Have some damn confidence in the call your making.

  4. jlb10 says: Sep 18, 2012 8:52 PM

    i don’t mind the lack of penalties down field. i’m tired on the defender not being able to come close to the wr without a yellow flag. also tired of every wr in the league getting up and looking for and/or asking for a flag every time they don’t make the catch

  5. eaglesfan036 says: Sep 18, 2012 8:54 PM

    While these replacements refs make plenty of mistakes, I like how they let the defenders and receivers play football.

  6. hines86for6 says: Sep 18, 2012 9:00 PM

    Jacoby Jones pushed while the ball was in the air. That’s the kicker.

    Offensive PI is still called at every other level once the ball is thrown.

  7. pottymouth777 says: Sep 18, 2012 9:36 PM

    Whatever adjustment Amendola made last sunday, it worked…

  8. mikevicksdoggydaycare says: Sep 18, 2012 9:41 PM

    There were more PI calls this year than last, but i like the aggressive play!

  9. onderin says: Sep 18, 2012 9:48 PM

    I find it interesting that there is the idea that the replacement refs are throwing flags down the field.

    I was listening to the Dan Patrick Show, in which Florio was a guest today, and statistically the replacement refs have thrown more pass interference flags in 2 games than the official refs did last season. Overall, the replacement refs have thrown more flags in 2 games.

    The illegal contact rule definitely hasn’t been enforced, but PI’s are up. What does that mean for how players are adjusting to the replacement refs? Both offense and defense sense they can get away with more within 5 yards, but haven’t adjusted that aggressive approach down the field?

  10. nyjets1017 says: Sep 18, 2012 9:49 PM

    Let them play. I am tired of a Wr crying for a flag everytime they don’t catch a ball. Maybe now they will try

  11. jordannels says: Sep 18, 2012 9:58 PM

    If they would have been throwing “downfield flags” all along, the Week 1 games would still be going.

    It’s an embarrassment.

  12. malachiofcourse says: Sep 18, 2012 10:45 PM

    i’ve kind of enjoyed the extra contact downfield, both teams are playing it evenly. maybe i’m just old school, and a D fan.

  13. skittlesareyum says: Sep 19, 2012 12:27 AM

    I’m actually OK with letting the defensive backs jostle more. I’m a Packers fan too, so this isn’t really benefitting me much.

    However…I would much prefer the rules be changed to match what is going to be called. If more contact is allowed, great – make it official. What I don’t like is the rules being basically ignored, yet still there whenever the refs feel like calling it. It leads to inconsistent penalties and teams unsure of how to actually play.

  14. voxnovo says: Sep 19, 2012 12:34 AM

    More physicality should favor the more physical players.

  15. juniorsplace88 says: Sep 19, 2012 5:44 AM

    The issue isn’t the pass interference calls. It’s the lack of consistency in calling illegal contact. There were numerous occasions when pass interference should have been called and they called illegal co”ntact.
    But the bigger issue is the nfl is going to talk to these replacement refs about it and there going to go crazy and start calling it now even when its not. I have a feeling this next week of games is going to get really ugly. I also fewl like the reason the passing #’s are down with some of the elite qb’s is because the lack of illegal contact being called. The db’s are practically raping the wide-outs and they are getting away with it.

  16. hehateme2 says: Sep 19, 2012 7:26 AM

    As if Revis needs any more assistance/inducement in his holding. Should be interesting when he pulls the jersey over the receivers head.

  17. bcaarms says: Sep 19, 2012 8:19 AM

    Statistically these replacements are doing better than the good ole boys last year. I don’t have a problem with them. Refs have cost teams playoff spots in the past. These refs soften that due to everyone knowing beforehand that some decisions will be difficult to get right, and if these guys get it right we are slightly surprised. The rules of this game are so different that no system is in place that will allow a ref to progress from the minors to the NFL. Pop Warner allows more contact of quarterbacks and receivers. With the overprotective attitudes in this new NFL, any hard hit is looked at closely as to why a flag was not thrown. Tackle football used to be a contact sport. Instead of paying one quarterback a huge sum of money, pay two or three lesser sums and put the rules back to where they were. The teams with a overpaid diva at quarterback get to watch the playoffs while their OB heals. If not, put * behind all new records. Jerry Rice caught passes over the middle knowing that a safety or linebacker was lined up on his helmet with theirs. Choosing a violent sport as ones profession is a risk. Ensuring a pro football player can have a 20 year career by changing rules lessens the game. Funny how football is often compared with going to war. Well in war they don’t throw flags. No infantry soldier fully expects to have a 20 year career in the meat grinder of combat. This NFL ref controversy is simply bringing to light the hypocrisy of the league. Selling tickets based on the showcased violence, while legislating out the actions that sold the tickets. Then turning around and trying to enforce the restrained rules onto a workforce that doesn’t respect the rules or the refs. Gotta love this country.

  18. pop562 says: Sep 19, 2012 9:17 AM

    This is the season for all players to get away with certain penalties since they know these refs aren’t on top of their game. Expect replays to be longer. In addition, coaches and players will try to intimidate the refs to throw out late flags.

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