Skip to content

NFL morning after: It’s the Texans and everyone else in the AFC

Getty Images

Is seven weeks into the season too early to declare home-field advantage wrapped up? Probably. But let’s be real about the state of the AFC right now: It’s the Texans and everyone else.

The Texans are so much better than the rest of the AFC that only a string of major injuries to key players (like Houston had last year) can prevent them from clinching home field for the playoffs, probably with a couple games left in the regular season. The road to the Super Bowl goes through Houston.

Entering Sunday, the Texans and Ravens were tied for the best record in the AFC at 5-1, and their meeting at Reliant Stadium looked like a possible AFC Championship preview. But on Sunday the Texans absolutely humiliated the Ravens, jumping out to a 29-3 halftime lead and coasting through the second half to win 43-13. If the Ravens are the second-best team in the AFC, then I don’t know if there’s ever been a bigger gap between the first and second-best teams in either conference in NFL history.

The Texans are such a complete team. They pass the ball well with Matt Schaub throwing to receivers Andre Johnson and Kevin Walter and tight end Owen Daniels. In Arian Foster they have one of the NFL’s best running backs. Defensive lineman J.J. Watt is my choice for Defensive Player of the Year in the NFL right now. Johnathan Joseph has been slowed by a groin injury this season, but when he’s at full speed he’s among the NFL’s best cornerbacks — and he looked like he’s getting closer to full speed when he picked off Joe Flacco and returned the interception 52 yards for a touchdown on Sunday.

All of that is half of the reason the Texans are so far ahead of the pack in the AFC. The other half is that every other team in the AFC is deeply flawed. Only the Texans, Ravens and Patriots have winning records, and it’s looking like a year when 8-8 may be enough to make the playoffs in the AFC. All those AFC teams hovering around .500 may look to some people like just the kind of parity everyone likes about the NFL, but it looks more like mediocrity to me.

The Texans’ loss to the Packers a week ago is a strong demonstration of how much better the NFC is than the AFC this season: If the Texans were in the other conference, they wouldn’t be the favorites to earn home-field advantage. But as the one and only really good team in a mediocre conference, the Texans have the clearest path to the Super Bowl of any team in the NFL.

Here are my other observations from the seventh Sunday of this NFL season:

Chris Johnson may be the most inconsistent player in NFL history. Johnson was absolutely sensational for the Titans in Sunday’s win over the Bills, carrying 18 times for 195 yards and two touchdowns, including one 83-yard run on which he looked like he could give Usain Bolt a competitive race. Johnson’s game-breaking ability is unmatched; previously in his NFL career Johnson has had touchdown runs of 91, 89 and 85 yards, and he’s the only player in NFL history with four career touchdown runs of 80 yards or longer. But for the Titans, it’s maddening that a player with the talent to run like that has so many absolutely terrible games. In the first six weeks of this season, Johnson had four different games in which he failed to gain even 25 yards. In those four games, Johnson’s total stat line is 48 carries for 69 yards and zero touchdowns. How can a player who’s good enough to gain 195 yards on 18 carries in one game be bad enough to total just 69 yards on 48 carries in four other games? It’s inexplicable.

Browns rookie defensive lineman Billy Wynn committed one of the dumbest penalties of the year. On a fourth down from the Colts’ own 22-yard line in the second quarter, the Indianapolis offense stayed on the field. Obviously, all they were going to do is try to draw the Browns’ defense offside: No NFL team ever goes for it on fourth down in that situation. Which obviously means that all the Browns had to do was not jump offside. And yet Wynn jumped offside, giving the Colts a free first down. Penalties don’t get much dumber than that.

Wynn’s penalty wasn’t even the Browns’ dumbest fourth-down decision. Browns coach Pat Shurmur made one of the bonehead calls of the year when he sent out his punter on fourth-and-1 from the Colts’ 41-yard line while trailing 17-13 with 6:38 left in the fourth quarter. That’s a situation where you have to go for it. You simply cannot give the ball away because you don’t trust your offense to gain one yard with the game on the line. The Browns, of course, ended up losing by that same 17-13 score. Shurmur is coaching for his job right now, and these are the decisions that get coaches fired.

We’re running out of superlatives for Robert Griffin III. Even in defeat, Griffin is doing amazing things as the Redskins’ quarterback. After Griffin completed 20 of 28 passes for 258 yards and two touchdowns, plus 89 yards rushing, players on the Giants’ defense declared Griffin the best quarterback they’ve faced this season. Giants defensive end Osi Umenyiora described Griffin as “flat-out unbelievable.” It’s amazing how good this guy is, at just 22 years old.

Last year we were running out of superlatives for Cam Newton. If you want to make the case that no one should get too excited about Griffin, all you have to do is point to Newton. Last year Newton was doing many of the same things Griffin was doing, making plays with his arm and his feet in an unbelievable rookie season for the Panthers. But this year Newton just doesn’t appear to be the same player. It’s not that Newton has been terrible, but in games like Sunday’s loss to the Cowboys, he just hasn’t been able to make plays when the Panthers need him. Becoming a great pro quarterback is a lot of work, and while Newton may achieve greatness eventually, he’s not there yet. Maybe a full year of film on Newton has better prepared NFL defenses to stop him, or maybe Newton let all the fame get to his head last year. But he’s not playing as well as he did in 2011.

The Jets aren’t going down without a fight. After they lost their best player, Darrelle Revis, to a season-ending knee injury and then lost their next game 34-0 to the 49ers, I thought the Jets would be one of the worst teams in the league the rest of the season. But I was wrong. The Jets are playing tough, competitive football. On Sunday in New England the Jets were (at least according to the Vegas lines) the biggest underdogs in the NFL. And yet they took the Patriots to overtime. Rex Ryan turns a lot of people off with all his bluster, but the guy is a damn good coach.

Colts coach Chuck Pagano had the biggest win of the day. Not because his team beat the Browns to improve to 3-3 and surpass last year’s win total, but because he was sent home after four weeks in the hospital while undergoing treatment for leukemia. For Pagano, that’s an important step to getting where he wants to be: Back to coaching his team.

Permalink 56 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Features, Rumor Mill, Top Stories
yo

Arians had surgery due to Christmas Eve hug from Fitzgerald

Getty Images

Near the end of an otherwise lost season for Arizona, the Cardinals pulled off a memorable road win in Seattle on Christmas Eve. The victory triggered an overly enthusiastic reaction from receiver Larry Fitzgerald.

As explained by Kent Somers of azcentral.com, Fitzgerald hugged coach Bruce Arians hard enough to tear a rotator cuff in his shoulder.

“It’s all Fitz’s fault, he caused the whole thing,” Arians said, via Somers. “It’s going to cost him.”

The question came up of Fitzgerald getting Arians a get-well card.

“It’s going to be a get-well convertible,” Arians said. “I’m still deciding what kind.”

Arians remains in a sling. Which probably means that the convertible should be an automatic, not a standard.

Permalink 1 Comment Feed for comments Back to top

NFLPA opens inquiry of Jaguars after Tom Coughlin email

Getty Images

The Jaguars hired Tom Coughlin to be their executive vice president of football operations on Jan. 9.

Since then, the NFL Players Association is known to have begun at least two separate inquiries related to the club’s front-office activity, the latest of which reportedly involves an email Coughlin sent to several players.

According to the Florida Times-Union’s Ryan O’Halloran, Coughlin requested via email for certain players under contract to report for a physical earlier this month. The union is looking into the off-season request, specifically in regard to its allowance under the collective bargaining agreement.

A Jaguars and NFL spokesman both declined comment when reached by Pro Football Talk.

This grievance from the NFL Players Association is not a total surprise, having been foreshadowed earlier this month. The NFL Network’s Mike Garafolo reported on March 2 there was discontent among agents and the union at the NFL Scouting Combine over the Jaguars requiring players without medical clearance to rehab at the facility four days a week.

Coughlin’s email similarly involves a request of injured players.  Per O’Halloran, player agents advised their clients to take the team’s physical as the union continued to explore the matter.

Earlier this off-season, former Jaguars defensive end Jared Odrick filed a $5.5 million grievance against the club, seeking to recoup guaranteed money. Per USA Today’s Tom Pelissero, the Jaguars contend Odrick “voided (the) guarantees by refusing checkups during injury rehab.” Odrick’s grievance has yet to be resolved, a source said Friday.

Any fallout related to Odrick’s situation is expected to be contained within the two parties.

If the Jaguars’ activity related to injured players is deemed a CBA violation, however, possible punishment could involve the forfeiture of a designated number of practices this spring.

 

 

Permalink 14 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Oakland touts last-ditch effort as better than Vegas offer

Getty Images

Yep, Oakland is making one last play to keep the Raiders. Whether it’s political cover or a viable Hail Mary pass remains to be seen.

For now, here’s what we know: Via ESPN.com, Oakland and its partners have submitted a “revised” plan to finance a $1.3 billion stadium at the site where the team’s current facility sits.

“At the end of the day this is the decision of the Raiders and the NFL,” Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf told ESPN. “What I am confident about is, if the Raiders want to stay in Oakland we have a viable plan to build them a stadium with no upfront money from them, in financial terms that I believe are more favorable to them than the terms in Las Vegas — what we know of them.

“And then, of course, we have something that Vegas can never offer, and that’s legacy and loyalty. This team was born in Oakland. This team enjoys some of the most passionate and dedicated fans of any NFL franchise. Those things belong uniquely to Oakland.”

Those things have been a non-issue when it comes to the team’s desire to get a new stadium, which over the past year or so has centered on Las Vegas. The question now becomes whether those qualities will prompt the Raiders to slam the brakes on the momentum building toward Las Vegas and explore an offer that could, in theory, get worse once it accomplishes its objective to pulling the emergency cord in the train car.

According to the last-second offer, the Raiders and the NFL would kick in the same $500 million that they’d contribute in Las Vegas. Fortress Investment Group would loan $650 million to the project, similar to the loan Bank of America would be making to the project in Las Vegas. Also, Oakland would contribute $200 million in infrastructure improvements, with Fortress paying $150 million of that amount up front and making it back later.

“I recognize that this could be our final chance, but we have worked so hard these last two years,” Schaaf said. “We’ve put together a viable deal that satisfies many requirements that we believe is the best deal for the Raiders and the NFL. We hope that they give it full consideration on Monday.”

Getting full consideration may be the primary objective of the latest offer. That way, Schaaf and other Oakland politicians can argue after the Raiders leave that they did everything they could to keep the team, but that it was the league and the Raiders that opted to leave.

Permalink 20 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Broncos “not pursuing” Tony Romo

Getty Images

With the annual meetings beginning this weekend and the Cowboys presumably hoping someone/anyone will make them a trade offer for quarterback Tony Romo, the Broncos are doing what they can to make sure the Cowboys know that there won’t be a spontaneous offer for Romo in Arizona.

Jeff Darlington of ESPN reports that the Broncos are “not pursuing” Romo, but that they haven’t closed the door on him.

The Broncos have consistently made it clear that they won’t trade for Romo, presumably because the momentum for weeks has been pointing toward the Cowboys cutting him. One day after telling Romo he’d be released, the Cowboys changed course, opting to wait for a possible trade.

The Cowboys likely have opted to wait for the league meetings in the hopes of getting an offer. If they don’t, they’ll have to decide whether to release him before the launch of the offseason program next month. At that point, they risk Romo suffering a fluke injury while on a treadmill or in the weight room that would put them on the hook for his full $14 million salary in 2017.

The Broncos were willing to trade for quarterback Colin Kaepernick last year. The talks broke down on the question of whether Kaepernick would reduce his $12 million base salary for 2016.

The Cowboys apparently believe that Romo has some value in trade, even if it’s a 2018 draft pick based on how many games he plays and how well his new team performs in 2017.

Given the possibility that Cowboys owner Jerry Jones doesn’t want Romo to play for the Texans, the best outcome for everyone could be a decision by Romo to walk away from the game and to become a broadcaster with FOX or CBS — perhaps with the door open on a Roger Clemens-style return during the season, if a contender loses its quarterback to injury.

Permalink 10 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Richard Sherman says he laughs at talk he could be traded

AP

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman is aware that there’s been some talk that he could be traded, but he finds it more amusing than anything else.

Sherman said on ESPN that he doesn’t buy into talk that he could be traded, although he believes the Seahawks would miss him if he were gone.

I just laugh it off, man,” Sherman said. “It’s funny to me. But sometimes people need to see you gone to realize what you had. The grass isn’t always greener on the other side. But I don’t let things like that bother me. The chips will fall how they’re supposed to.”

The talk of trading Sherman started with former Browns and Patriots executive Michael Lombardi saying Sherman could be available in a trade for the right offer. Of course, every player in the league is available for the right offer, but there’s been no word on what the Seahawks would consider “the right offer” for a player like Sherman.

Sherman doesn’t sound too concerned about the possibility that he’ll be anywhere other than Seattle this season.

Permalink 27 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Cowboys bolster O-line, sign Byron Bell

Getty Images

The Cowboys’ offensive line absorbed a couple departures this offseason, losing right tackle Doug Free to retirement and parting with left guard Ronald Leary in free agency.

On Friday, the unit welcomed an addition.

Veteran lineman Byron Bell signed with the team following a Friday visit, ESPN’s Todd Archer first reported. Bell missed all of the 2016 season after dislocating his ankle on the first day of organized team activities.

Dallas had a ready-made option to replace Leary, turning to La’El Collins after Leary signed with the Broncos.

Bell now becomes an option to replace the retired Free at right tackle. The ex-Titan offers versatility between the guard and tackle positions. He has started 72 of 78 career games, including 16 during his lone healthy season with the Titans in 2015.

Permalink 4 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Suspended Josh Gordon trains with ex-Olympian

Josh Gordon AP

There is little sense in speculating as to whether or not this will be it, whether this comeback attempt from Josh Gordon will be the one that returns the uber-talented deep threat to the field.

That will come down to Gordon, if the NFL allows it.

But before potential reinstatement, it seems he’s putting in the work.

The suspended Browns wide receiver, who hasn’t played an NFL down the past two seasons, reportedly is training with speed coach Tim Montgomery, a former Olympian, in Florida as part of his effort to resurrect his career. Violations of the league’s substance-abuse policy have cost the 2012 supplemental second-round pick 44 games the past four years. He was suspended a 45th game in 2012 for a violation of team rules.

Gordon caught 87 passes for 1,646 yards and nine touchdowns in 2013.

That came despite missing two games to a league suspension.

There is some off-the field relevancy in Gordon’s partnership with Montgomery. The latter is in position to mentor Gordon, having overcome his own pitfalls.

As cataloged by ESPN’s Dan Graziano,  Montgomery “served prison time after pleading guilty to possession and distribution of more than 100 grams of heroin in 2008 and was stripped of his medals and suspended in 2005 for using performance-enhancing drugs based on evidence gathered in the criminal investigation of the BALCO steroid scandal.”

Graziano cited sources who expect the NFL to determine Gordon’s status for 2017 “by late April or early May.” Gordon will turn 26 on April 13.

Permalink 18 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Panthers sign quarterback Garrett Gilbert

Getty Images

The Panthers needed another arm for OTAs, since Cam Newton’s isn’t available.

And boy they found one.

According to Field Yates of ESPN, the Panthers signed quarterback Garrett Gilbert.

Gilbert was most recently on the Raiders’ practice squad, and has also spent time with the Lions, Patriots and Rams.

He hasn’t thrown a regular season pass, but he did earn a Super Bowl ring with the Patriots in 2015.

The Panthers needed someone other than Derek Anderson and Joe Webb for practice since Newton’s about to have shoulder surgery next week, which will keep him out until at least the start of training camp.

Permalink 6 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

CBS is pursuing Tony Romo, too

Getty Images

FOX isn’t the only network that hopes to hire Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo. CBS reportedly wants to sign him up, too.

Adam Schefter of ESPN reports that CBS is “making a strong push” to add Romo.

At FOX, Romo reportedly would be the replacement for John Lynch, the 49ers G.M. who had been the No. 2 analyst at FOX. At CBS, it’s unclear where Romo would land on the pecking order.

In 2016, the No. 1 team at CBS was Jim Nantz and Phil Simms, following by Ian Eagle and Dan Fouts, Greg Gumbel and Trent Green, Kevin Harlan and Rich Gannon, Spero Dedes and Solomon Wilcots, Andrew Catalon and Steve Tasker/Steve Beuerlein, Tom McCarthy and Adam Archuleta, and Carter Blackburn and Chris Simms. Romo could supplant an analyst, or potentially slide into a spot and bump everyone else down a peg.

So how high would Romo land on the pecking order as a first-year analyst? Based on the routine social-media reaction, many will hope that he rockets to the top of the stack, bumping Phil Simms from the primary crew. (And, of course, once Romo has the job, he’ll be the guy from CBS that people constantly complain about on Twitter.)

The answer also depends on whether Romo is willing to conclusively slam the door on football. In theory, he could take a TV job and keep an eye on potential football opportunities for a mid-to-late-season jump back to the game. CBS likely wouldn’t install him as the No. 1 analyst unless he’s fully committed to the TV gig.

Permalink 36 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Oakland makes last ditch effort to disrupt Raiders move

Getty Images

With all signs pointing to the Raiders securing at least 24 votes next week to relocate to Las Vegas, Oakland isn’t going down without a fight. Or at least without a random, awkward swing at air.

Via Daniel Kaplan of SportsBusiness Journal, Oakland claims that the investment firm trying to build a new Raiders stadium is willing to lend money to the Raiders on the same terms that Bank of America will do for the Las Vegas venue. If the terms don’t include at any level a path to equity in the franchise, maybe it would get the attention of owner Mark Davis.

It’s a slim maybe. Davis seems to be determined to move the team to Las Vegas, with a mindset hardened by the failure of Oakland to do anything until the Raiders were picking out drapes in their new house.

Kaplan also explains that a new Oakland stadium would be ready by 2021, only one year after a new stadium in Las Vegas. He likewise points out that Oakland regards concerns about baseball’s A’s being displaced by the project as a red herring, and that the site is large enough to allow an NFL stadium to be built without the A’s being disrupted or forced to move.

The last-ditch effort to secure at least nine votes to block the move could be too late. Albert Breer of TheMMQB.com recently reported that the Raiders have 27 or 28 votes in his pocket. And if it appears that Davis won’t have 24, the vote will likely get pushed to the quarterly meeting in May.

For now, the indications are that the vote is coming next week, and that the Raiders will secure the green light to head to the city where gambling is prevalent — and no one connected to the NFL seems to be particularly seems to be troubled by that.

Permalink 41 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

MVP to finding Brady’s jerseys? Houston mayor says Houston PD

Getty Images

The FBI Boston Division called it “truly a collaborative effort.”

Patriots owner Robert Kraft said it was “another example of the importance of teamwork and what can be accomplished when everyone works together.”

The Houston mayor is saying, well, something else.

Sylvester Turner expressed pride in his local police force Friday for the department’s role in two stolen Tom Brady Super Bowl jerseys being recovered this week in Mexico. And he took it a step further, saying that Houston police was the real MVP to an international joint operation.

“I’m very proud of the Houston Police Department,” Turner said via Fox 26 Houston Sports Director Mark Berman. “And to be honest with you, it was the Houston Police Department that did the legwork, that found that jersey. A lot of other people are taking credit for it, but the reality is it was the Houston Police Department, the law enforcement community right here, that … found the jerseys and made that happen.”

It is unclear where, along the way, Turner felt his local authorities were slighted.

In his Thursday statement, Kraft mentioned “many different local agencies” being involved in the process along with skepticism that any one of the involved agencies could’ve accomplished the feat alone. The Houston Police Department was included by name when the FBI Boston Division released a statement earlier this week.

“We want to thank our FBI field offices in Chicago, Phoenix, and Houston; the United States Attorney’s Offices in the District of Connecticut, the Southern District of Texas, and the District of Arizona; and our FBI Mexico City Legal Attaché,” the statement read. “We would also like to thank our law enforcement partners in Mexico, in particular, the Mexican Attorney General’s Office, for their invaluable assistance in resolving this matter. Assistance was also provided by the security teams from the NFL and the New England Patriots, the Massachusetts State Police, and Houston Police Department.”

Apparently, the best was saved for last.

Permalink 41 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Blandino acknowledges 10-minute overtime will lead to more ties, Ty

When it comes to whether Rich McKay and Dean Blandino believe that a reduced overtime period will result in more ties, Ty, we have a tie.

On Thursday, the Competition Committee chairman downplayed the risk of more teams having win-lose-draw records. Sort of.

“We don’t think it will lead to more ties,” McKay said. “Could it? It could.”

On Friday’s PFT Live, NFL senior V.P. of officiating Dean Blandino admitted the obvious.

‘There’s no question that when you shorten that overtime period, the potential for ties does increase,” Blandino said. “And I don’t think we feel that ties are necessarily a bad thing. They’re certainly great for tiebreakers when it comes to postseason. But ultimately you want to have a winner in the game. But it’s about player safety. And it’s about the number of snaps that our players have to take part in in overtime games.

“We had two ties last year. One game that went down to the final second. And we really can’t control in the regular season when that team is playing again. And sometimes a team plays five quarters and then has to go back out on Thursday night. So it’s about player safety. We understand the potential for more ties, but the safety risks outweigh the potential for tie games.”

First, while the NFL may not think ties are “necessarily a bad thing,” pretty much everyone else does.

Second, more ties won’t make it “great” for tiebreakers. As ties pile up they’ll no longer be a curiosity that avoids exercises like comparing winning percentage against common opponents because more teams will have records like 9-6-1, 10-5-1, and even 7-7-2.

Third, there’s no guarantee that a shorter overtime will correlate to reduced game action. The Week Seven tie between the Seahawks and Cardinals had 36 extra snaps. The Week Eight tie between Washington and the Bengals included 41 extra snaps. Shortening overtime by five minutes doesn’t automatically mean ties will have two thirds of the snaps, since teams will try to jam in as many snaps as possible in order to break the tie.

As long, however, as it’s fewer than 36 or 41 snaps, then it will be safer than a 15-minute overtime. And that seems to be what the league wants, primarily as it relates to avoiding one of the primary criticisms of short-week football. There’s no way to know without trying it out, and that’s why the change in overtime should be adopted on a one-year basis, requiring only nine votes to end it next year instead of 24 to wipe it from the books if the reduced snaps don’t outweigh the increased ties.

Or they could adopt the PFT overtime idea, which is explained in detail in the video attached to this post, after the quote from Blandino.

Permalink 22 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

49ers bring RFA pass-rusher Jacquies Smith in for a visit

Getty Images

Trent Baalke’s gone, but the 49ers still have a thing for guys with torn ACLs.

According to Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network, the 49ers are having restricted free agent defensive end Jacquies Smith in for a visit.

The Buccaneers put the low tender of $1.797 million on Smith, after he tore his ACL in Week One last year. But since he entered the league as an undrafted free agent, he can be obtained without compensation (though the Bucs can match any offer sheet the 49ers might offer).

Smith has shown some pass-rush ability, with 13.5 sacks the last two healthy seasons. And since it would only cost money, it’s worth a shot for the 49ers if Smith is able to come back healthy.

Baalke, their former G.M., tried to buy low on talented players coming off ACLs in the draft, even if he missed more often than he hit with that strategy.

Permalink 10 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Cardinals aren’t panicking about all the free agency defections

Getty Images

If you’re the General Manager of a team that just lost five defensive starters in free agency, it would probably be bad for morale to run down the halls screaming “We’re all gonna die!”

So if you’re Cardinals G.M. Steve Keim, you look for the half-full glass and proceed, after losing defensive tackle Calais Campbell, safeties Tony Jefferson and D.J. Swearinger, cornerback Marcus Cooper, and linebacker Kevin Minter.

“You can see we’ve obviously done a good job of identifying players,” Keim said, via Kent Somers of the Arizona Republic. “When guys like Marcus Cooper get five-plus million dollars [from the Bears] or D.J. Swearinger are getting big contracts, these are guys we took off the street that nobody else wanted. Our personnel department does a fantastic job and our coaches do a good job of developing these guys and getting them ready.”

Well, I guess if that’s your perspective, he has a point. They acquired Cooper for a seventh-round pick and got a good year out of him. Swearinger had bounced around. Jefferson was an undrafted rookie who grew into a starter. They drafted Campbell and Minter.

And if you really want to be Mr. Silver Lining, they ought to be on the right side of the margin when it comes time for compensatory picks next year.

But there’s still the matter of replacing the production, and signing old guys like Karlos Dansby and Antoine Bethea also comes with some risks as well, and the Cardinals still need to draft some difference-makers to replace the talent other people paid for.

Permalink 20 Comments Feed for comments Back to top

Jets G.M. not saying if Josh McCown is the starting quarterback

AP

Jets General Manager Mike Maccagnan signed quarterback Josh McCown to a contract that guarantees him $6 million this year, but he’s not ready to declare McCown the starting quarterback.

On a conference call today, Maccagnan declined to talk about who will be the starting quarterback for the Jets this year, other than to say the call will be made by head coach Todd Bowles. Maccagnan did say, however, that the Jets are unlikely to add another veteran quarterback.

McCown certainly seems like the favorite to be the starter. Neither of the other two quarterbacks on the roster, Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg, has shown himself ready to start in the NFL. McCown has at least been a competent starter for a long time in the NFL, and that gives him a leg up.

It’s still possible, of course, that the Jets will acquire their starting quarterback in the draft. But at the moment McCown looks like the most likely Week One starter, even if the Jets aren’t ready to say so just yet.

Permalink 28 Comments Feed for comments Back to top