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Aaron Rodgers not afraid to speak his mind, on his terms

Aaron Rodgers AP

Early in his career, Aaron Rodgers wasn’t in a spot to say much. But now that he’s grown into a full-blown star, the Packers quarterback isn’t bashful about sharing his opinions, even when he’s jokingly answering “Sssshhhh,” to his critics.

Like many players, Rodgers has his own radio show (his is on ESPN Milwaukee), which creates a weekly discussion thanks to his willingness to say what other players won’t.

“The fact he has had success, people are more interested in him,” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said, via Alex Marvez of FOXSports.com. “He’s answering more questions than he ever has. He is a young man that has a lot of depth and interests. He’s a very interesting person.”

From ripping the Pro Bowl to apologizing to fans for the replacement ref debacle in Seattle this year, his listeners get his unvarnished opinions, of which he has many. That included defending his friend Ryan Braun, the Milwaukee Brewers left fielder, whose failed drug test was overturned on appeal.

“I believe in the truth,” Rodgers said. “I know there are three sides to every story — each person’s individual side and what actually is the truth.

“Because of my friendship with Ryan, I was privy to some other [private] information. He needed support. In his time of need, I needed to stand by him.”

Many players are frankly scared to speak out, because they don’t want to deal with the backlash if they voice an opinion that’s the least bit controversial (or even just a harsh truth).

“If you’re not politically correct, you make headlines around here and get your quotes put on ESPN and misinterpreted,” outside linebacker Clay Matthews said. “So 99.9 percent of the time, we have to tell you stuff that might not be the truth. That’s the reality of it.

“With that, I think he’s just being honest [on the radio show]. You can’t fault him for that.”

Other quarterbacks with their own shows will soft-shoe through them, trying to say as little as possible. Not Rodgers.

“I’ve spoken the truth,” he said. “That’s always the easiest way to do it, in my opinion.”

A novel concept, which makes him a must-listen, and sadly, rare.

 

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30 Responses to “Aaron Rodgers not afraid to speak his mind, on his terms”
  1. johosophat says: Nov 2, 2012 3:53 PM

    If you don’t listen to it, you should you can listen on ESPN 540 (Milwaukee ESPN channel) his interviews are with Jason Wilde every Tuesday at 1:30pm Central Time, it makes my Tuesdays much more entertaining then they would be without him.

  2. geniusfan says: Nov 2, 2012 3:58 PM

    I hate ESPN. They’ve done a lot of good things over the years but now they’ve devolved into the TMZ of sports. They should call themselves E!SPN.

    Players are scared to speak the truth because the four letter network will twist their words and create an issue. It’s a shame.

    I’m glad Rodgers speaks his mind and he has a lot of good thoughts. However it’s only a matter of time before he says something that gets blown out of proportion and then he’ll never speak out again.

  3. toonloonboon says: Nov 2, 2012 4:01 PM

    hey aaron, if GB lets go a bunch of players this offseason, does that mean they cut the cheese?

  4. tharoostah says: Nov 2, 2012 4:03 PM

    So what did he say?

  5. samanthasteeleruinedmyqb says: Nov 2, 2012 4:04 PM

    “I believe in the truth,” Rodgers said. “I know there are three sides to every story — each person’s individual side and what actually is the truth.
    “I’ve spoken the truth,” he said.
    ________

    Apparently there aren’t three sides when Rodgers speaks. His personal opinion equates to the truth.

  6. crownofthehelmet says: Nov 2, 2012 4:05 PM

    Apologizing to fans for the replacement ref debacle in Seattle?!?

    I hope he meant he was sorry that the bad PI calls that went against Seattle gave Packers the hope of still getting a final Hail Mary pass. If that’s what he meant, than I accept.

  7. blacknole08 says: Nov 2, 2012 4:07 PM

    I admire the fact that Rodgers is not afraid to speak his mind, especially given that he has the platform to do it. He’s earned that right and respect from his peers and the fans. And he keeps it real for the most part.

    But he does come off as annoying and arrogant at times too, whether it’s complaining that the defensive scout team isn’t playing hard enough or the bad calls from the ref.

    He just needs to sometimes kick back and let people talk. His play already does the talking for him.

  8. ironhawk says: Nov 2, 2012 4:12 PM

    Everyone talks about liking the guy whose honest, until he says something you don’t agree with.

  9. blacknole08 says: Nov 2, 2012 4:12 PM

    “I believe in the truth,” Rodgers said. “I know there are three sides to every story — each person’s individual side and what actually is the truth.

    “I’ve spoken the truth,” he said. “That’s always the easiest way to do it, in my opinion.”

    —————————————————–

    It’s contradictory statements as this by Rodgers that reaffirms why people are beginning to dislike him. He says there are 3 sides, yet he says his side is truthful.

    His bravado is starting to rub me the wrong way.

  10. datageek94 says: Nov 2, 2012 4:15 PM

    In a world where it often seems telling the truth is unthinkable…good for him.

  11. dkrause71 says: Nov 2, 2012 4:19 PM

    I love watching Aaron and the Packers have been my team for over 30 years but i much preferred the quieter Rodgers. I get that Aaron has a show and has to say something, i also get that he has a right to say what he wants but eventually he is going to say something that either causes a rift with the team or getting him into hot water with the fans/league. Just because you have the platform to do so doesn’t always mean you should. Love watching you play Aaron, just try to keep the comment generic, the last QB we had tended to say things we wish he didn’t at times.

  12. jonnydapat says: Nov 2, 2012 4:20 PM

    A great coach often tells his players, when you win, say nothing when you lose say less. That would be Bill Belichick.

  13. filthymcnasty1 says: Nov 2, 2012 4:21 PM

    I’m looking forward to hearing more of the unscrubbed version of his thoughts. After having to tiptoe around all the drama leftover from his predecessor’s contentious departure, he’s earned the right to speak his mind.

  14. bordner says: Nov 2, 2012 4:25 PM

    Thank God for Aaron Rodgers and his weekly radio show.

    Without the quotes that come from it, what else would inspire all of the anti-Packer trolls that feel the need to post their mind-numbingly unoriginal comments here every week?

  15. thegreatgabbert says: Nov 2, 2012 4:26 PM

    One of these days he’s going to tell Brett Favre to start washing his own pickup truck. It’s a long drive to Hattiesburg twice a week.

  16. wayne1693 says: Nov 2, 2012 4:27 PM

    On the other hand, can you really fault the NFL for wanting their Stars focused on Football, rather than Controversy? With all the Knuckle-Heads in the League, e.g., ‘Days Without an Arrest’…there is plenty of that to go around.

  17. binkystevens says: Nov 2, 2012 4:50 PM

    Say what you want about Rodgers, but I respect his opinions when he speaks out. The refs needed calling out after the Seattle game; good for him. The Pro Bowl is a joke as well. He also called out the commissioner after Johnny Jolly was suspended for banning him from team contact, which essentially removed his safety net and support network. Then what do you know, Jolly relapsed and went to jail and may never play in the NFL again.

    Regardless of your opinions on Ryan Braun, good for Rodgers for sticking up for a friend. And finally – he has publicly called out Skip Bayless for being a massive tool.

  18. profootballwalk says: Nov 2, 2012 4:52 PM

    So he actually apologized for the replacement refs? That’s speaking truth to power. Does he get this year’s Profiles in Courage award for ‘apologizing’ for something he had nothing to do with? But he stands up for a doper? Right on, my brother!

  19. granadafan says: Nov 2, 2012 5:00 PM

    It looks as if Rodgers DID learn something at CAL, home of the Free Speech Movement. Good for him. He’s a well-spoken and smart guy and has given the fans some good insights.

  20. Wisconsin77 says: Nov 2, 2012 5:03 PM

    I have no problem with AR speaking his mind every week and trying to play GM. I do have a problem with the GB fans who used to get on Favre for the same thing who now thing AR doing this is the neatest thing since the invention of the toaster.

  21. joetoronto says: Nov 2, 2012 5:26 PM

    “Because of my friendship with Ryan, I was privy to some other [private] information. He needed support. In his time of need, I needed to stand by him.”

    Like any good wife would do.

  22. titogetmesometissue says: Nov 2, 2012 6:12 PM

    C’mon smanathasteele, I hate the pack as much as the next guy, but you’re not suggesting that Rodgers can only speak the “truth” if he is speaking the objectively, verfiable truth? Who knows that? Besides Rush Limbaugh?

  23. wattsrmyline says: Nov 2, 2012 6:20 PM

    I’m a die hard Browns fan but this guy is awesome, it only tells his MoM and DaD came up the hard way and spent al-lot of time teaching him right from wrong.

    This kid is special and all praise goes to the Lord!

  24. bobnelsonjr says: Nov 2, 2012 6:28 PM

    Most of Wisconsin is very honest and speaks in a forthright manner.

    Unfortunately the radio show is in urban Milwaukee where some left wing liars reside. They are not used to the concept of an unchanging truth.

    In this era of foreigners tearing down truth, justice, and the American Constitution, it is great to hear an honest Christian man from Wisconsin actually participate in the media.

  25. thetokyosandblaster says: Nov 2, 2012 8:19 PM

    I have people on Bears boards and Vikings boards saying they’re mad at me for “trolling.”

    I don’t see them here to lambaste crownofthehelmet and samanthasteeledeservesbetterthanmyQB.

    Weird.

  26. fringetastic says: Nov 2, 2012 8:29 PM

    “Many players are frankly scared to speak out, because they don’t want to deal with the backlash if they voice an opinion that’s the least bit controversial (or even just a harsh truth).”

    In line with what ironside said above, consider Mendenhall. People don’t like what he says, even though it has lots of truth to it.

  27. tessluvsfootball says: Nov 2, 2012 8:31 PM

    If you haven’t listened to his show i recommend you do at least once. Podcasts are available a few hours after the show. What you get from listening to him instead of reading select quotes is his tone. There are times he’s saying things in jest yet that doesn’t come across in the written word.

  28. chi01town says: Nov 2, 2012 9:45 PM

    Rodgers belives he can say anything he wants. Hes in for a surprise. The media has fangs and as soon as hes NOT READY they will
    bite. DONT THINK HES BETTER THAN ANYONE ELSE. lose a game or two and then try to say what you want.

  29. vltrophy14 says: Nov 3, 2012 1:26 AM

    Sometimes it’s hard to hear the truth but u got to. It’s a shame the Packers had to have those pathetic refs make that call in Seattle. Rodgers has a right to say what needs to be said

  30. noeffinway says: Nov 3, 2012 11:41 AM

    Favre 2.0

    Looks like he learned more than football from The Great Favre.

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