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Players balk at Toradol restrictions

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With the NFL currently facing an avalanche of litigation arising from allegations that the league failed to take proper steps to protect players from concussions, the league is trying to avoid a future flood of lawsuits arising from a potent painkiller that could cause long-term kidney, liver, and/or gastrointestinal problems.

The league quietly has restricted the use of wonder drug Toradol.  In the past, players routinely clamored for pre-game shots, as former NFL center Jeremy Newberry told Andrea Kremer of HBO’s Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel earlier this year.

“I’ve seen lines of 20 or 30 of them standing there waiting for a shot,” Newberry said.

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello says that teams have now been told to use Toradol injections only for “an acute, game-related injury where significant bleeding is not expected and where other oral medications are inadequate or not tolerated.”

The changes came after NFL team physicians developed a task force aimed at making recommendations regarding the use of Toradol.  The task force, which included input from outside experts, decided that Toradol ordinarily should be taken orally.

The players don’t like it.  Per a league source, players believe that the injections are critical for dealing with pain, both before a game and after a game.

Thus, just as players don’t worry about the future impact of head injuries, they also don’t care about the future health risks associated with Toradol.  The league does, regardless of whether the goal is to protect the players from themselves or to protect the league from another flock of future former players.

 

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14 Responses to “Players balk at Toradol restrictions”
  1. dabears212 says: Nov 11, 2012 6:56 PM

    These players who don’t like these restrictions will be the ones who sue the NFL in 20 years because they “weren’t warned about the effects of this drug”.

  2. fuglyflorio says: Nov 11, 2012 6:57 PM

    Smoking is bad for you too. Let’s all hop aboard the ‘free money’ train.

  3. richwizl says: Nov 11, 2012 7:01 PM

    The guys who make the rules don’t understand how much pain is involved with playing football at the pro level. The need more than Ibuprophen.

  4. csilojohnson says: Nov 11, 2012 7:04 PM

    And cannabis is a prohibited substance. Mean while the methadone line before games includes almost 2/3 of the roster.

  5. mattolikesthevikes says: Nov 11, 2012 7:06 PM

    Druggies!!!!

  6. indycoltsluck says: Nov 11, 2012 7:14 PM

    This is what happens when doctors refuse to use the correct kind of pain medication. Toradol is fine for occasional use if you are not on any medication. However, with as much pain medicine as these guys need it is completely inappropriate. They need to be given narcotic injections that are much safer. All this nonsense about abuse is doing a great deal a physical damage to these players bodies by overusing anti-inflammatory medicine and then under treating their pain.

  7. ottawabrave91 says: Nov 11, 2012 7:14 PM

    its non narcotic. but it runs the same risks as tylenol and ibuprofen. there are pain killers without these risks. why don’t they switch. what would you rather have a low risk of addiction or a high risk of organ failure?

  8. sabatimus says: Nov 11, 2012 7:17 PM

    “ottawabrave91 says:
    Nov 11, 2012 7:14 PM
    its non narcotic. but it runs the same risks as tylenol and ibuprofen. there are pain killers without these risks. why don’t they switch. what would you rather have a low risk of addiction or a high risk of organ failure?”

    Name them.

  9. indycoltsluck says: Nov 11, 2012 7:29 PM

    Morphine, Tramadol, Diluted, Demerol injections are all much safer to give on a repeated basis than Torodol. Anti-inflammatory medications are much more dangerous than the narcotics even though there is a low risk of addiction, it’s a far lower risk than what Torodol and anti-inflammatory meds can do to you especially if you need them everyday like an NFL player does.

  10. steelernationfartsinyourfaceandwinschampionships says: Nov 11, 2012 7:32 PM

    LOL

  11. badassleroybrown says: Nov 11, 2012 8:04 PM

    I agree with these players….I got pissed to when the clinic tried to take away my METHODONE….the reduction ruined my performance my 40time wasnt the same after couldnt outrun the cops on foot anymore.

  12. csilojohnson says: Nov 11, 2012 8:33 PM

    Narcotic painkillers with a low risk of addiction? Who told you that, FDA, DEA? All narcotics have a high risk of addiction. Especially when used daily or even weekly. To think otherwise is simply nieve.

  13. piscataquis007 says: Nov 11, 2012 8:41 PM

    @indycoltsluck – it’s “Dilauded”, not “diluted” Dilauded is basically synthetic morphine.

    Something I found interesting:

    “Thus, just as players don’t worry about the future impact of head injuries, they also don’t care about the future health risks associated with Toradol.”

    So the players don’t worry about long term head injury problems, yet we continue to hear about the endless string of lawsuits brought against the NFL by former players on that very topic. Makes you wonder if the same will happen with the Toradol/pain medication issue, 20 years from now, are we going to see the lawsuits related to organ failure, cancer, or whatever else related to over medication.

  14. denverscott says: Nov 11, 2012 10:16 PM

    Why not give them proponol or whatever M. Jacson was on? Then they could form a milk line before every game.

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