Peterson’s grand jury testimony results in prompt decision to drop case

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Adrian Peterson’s lawyer, Rusty Hardin, had a problem.  And he came up with a solution that got the charges dropped.

Hardin believed Peterson wasn’t guilty of resisting arrest (to date, it still isn’t clear what he was being arrested for when he allegedly resisted arrest), but prosecutors had a pair of police officers who insisted that Peterson had crossed the line.  Since prosecutors routinely work with police officers, it would have been difficult for the prosecutor to drop the charges if the police officers wanted to proceed.

So Hardin came up with an idea.  Although grand juries are convened typically in felony cases, why not let a grand jury decide whether the case against Peterson should go forward?

Hardin explained the procedure via phone to PFT earlier this afternoon.  He said he was willing to let Peterson testify without a lawyer present in a room with 12 citizens and a prosecutor because Hardin firmly believed Peterson had done nothing wrong.

The prosecutor agreed to the approach, and Peterson flew to Houston on Monday night for the session.  On Tuesday morning, the two police officers, an employee of the club where the incident happened, and Peterson separately testified.  Peterson met with the grand jury for roughly 25 minutes.  Approximately five minutes after he left the room, the grand jury decided that the case should be dropped.

“We thought this is what would happen,” Hardin told PFT.  “But we thought we’d have to have a trial to make it happen.  He didn’t push shove or hit a police officer, and he didn’t resist any police officer.”

Hardin pointed out that three “red flags” made him even more confident Peterson would be exonerated.  First, several employees of the club insisted that Peterson did nothing wrong.  Second, four of the six police officers who were on the scene said they didn’t see anything.  Third, none of the many patrons who were present in the club for the incident were quoted as corroborating the arresting officer in the police report.

Officially, the charges will be dismissed on Wednesday.  When that happens, the best year of Adrian Peterson’s career will be a little better.

And the next time he comes to Houston, it won’t be for a court appearance.  It’ll be for a game next month against the Texans.

“I told him I hope he rushes for 200 yards and loses,” Hardin said.  “Adrian said, ‘I’ll take 200 and a win.'”

27 responses to “Peterson’s grand jury testimony results in prompt decision to drop case

  1. Ok, I like Adrian Peterson. I think he is a great guy, and one of the best RB’s today.

    But, if he wasn’t rich/famous, this would have gone completely different, and that’s crap.

  2. Sounds like someone tried to make headlines for themselves arresting a celebrity. I hope that those responsible are reprimanded. I’d take Adrian Peterson’s word over many cops.

  3. So that means that the cops lied. Why aren’t they being punished? Cops shouldn’t be able to wrongfully arrest someone and not be punished at all. No one is above the law.

  4. urlacher54 says:
    Nov 13, 2012 4:11 PM
    Ok, I like Adrian Peterson. I think he is a great guy, and one of the best RB’s today.

    But, if he wasn’t rich/famous, this would have gone completely different, and that’s crap.
    ————————————————-
    You are 100% correct. Nothing would have happened at the club if he wasn’t rich and famous. Just a couple of cops with big egos trying to make a name for themselves

  5. Good for AP. Rather go after those cops for their overzealous acts, they should be forced to put on pads, take the field, and try to take down AP without hancuffs, batons, mace, stun guns and 4 cop buddies.

  6. it would have been difficult for the prosecutor to drop the charges if the police officers wanted to proceed.

    —————

    That’s completely wrong. Yes, police and prosecutors work together. Police arrest people. Ultimately, it’s the prosecutors job to decide whether or not to prosecute. A prosecutor can decline to prosecute a case for any reason she/he deems appropriate.

  7. urlacher54 says:
    Nov 13, 2012 4:11 PM
    Ok, I like Adrian Peterson. I think he is a great guy, and one of the best RB’s today.

    But, if he wasn’t rich/famous, this would have gone completely different, and that’s crap.

    ———————————–

    Yea the guy probably wouldn’t have even stopped him to ask for his autograph or prove that he’s a better and bigger man than an NFL running back. MMA fighters go through it all the time, guy wants to think there tough by trying to fight a professional, or even better ask any bouncer how drunk guys always want to test there luck against a bigger man.

  8. That’s completely wrong. Yes, police and prosecutors work together. Police arrest people. Ultimately, it’s the prosecutors job to decide whether or not to prosecute. A prosecutor can decline to prosecute a case for any reason she/he deems appropriate.

    =====

    You’re missing the point. True, prosecutors are the ones with discretion, but the point remains true. The relationship b/w cops and prosecutors is rocky enough b/c cops are on the front lines and resent prosecutorial discretion. If prosecutors want to make the relationship even worse, they’ll dismiss a case that the arresting officers are adamant about prosecuting.

  9. Crooked Texas Cops… This was BS from the beginning.. AP’s way to good of a guy anyhow.. Good to get this behind him on his way to another phenomenal year. Being on 2 of my fantasy teams I’m glad he can move on and do what he does. all day beast mode.

  10. The jury was awestruck because of who he is. I’m sick of rich people being able to do whatever they want. Because he can break tackles and run fast he doesn’t have to obey the laws is what they are saying. Same with every out of control athlete today.

  11. cardinalsfan87 says:
    Nov 13, 2012 9:47 PM

    The jury was awestruck because of who he is. I’m sick of rich people being able to do whatever they want. Because he can break tackles and run fast he doesn’t have to obey the laws is what they are saying. Same with every out of control athlete today.

    ————————————————–

    I am sure some jurours had no idea who he is. I guess you have no idea how a jury selection goes. And he didn’t do anything he wanted because he didn’t do anything. Did you not even read this article? Get a clue…..

    ” First, several employees of the club insisted that Peterson did nothing wrong. Second, four of the six police officers who were on the scene said they didn’t see anything. Third, none of the many patrons who were present in the club for the incident were quoted as corroborating the arresting officer in the police report.”

  12. The jury was awestruck because of who he is. I’m sick of rich people being able to do whatever they want. Because he can break tackles and run fast he doesn’t have to obey the laws is what they are saying. Same with every out of control athlete today.

    You obviously know nothing about Adrian Peterson and what an outstanding and exemplary man he is off the field. You would be hard pressed to find a better role model in all of the professional athletes of all sports.

    I am more concerned about corrupt law enforcement personal that think they are above the law.

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