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New Vilma filing targets alleged Warner bounty, Cerullo’s credibility

Vilma AP

The bounty case definitely isn’t over.

In a new court filing opposing the efforts of Commissioner Roger Goodell to obtain a dismissal of Saints linebacker Jonathan Vilma’s defamation lawsuit, Vilma takes aim at two key factors:  the alleged bounty on Cardinals quarterback Kurt Warner prior to the 2009 NFC divisional playoff game, and the credibility of former Saints assistant Mike Cerullo.

The overriding goal is to persuade Judge Helen Berrigan that Goodell knew the allegation of a bounty on Warner was false, or that Goodell made the statement with reckless disregard as to whether the claim of a Warner bounty was true or false.  This enhanced legal standard applies in cases of defamation brought by public figures.

Along the way, Ginsberg calls Goodell’s statements “wanton and malicious,” “fictional,” and “inflammatory,” and Ginsberg writes that Goodell accused Vilma of engaging in “quasi-criminal” behavior.

In making the argument that the case against Goodell should proceed, Vilma’s lawyer, Peter Ginsberg, explains that the NFL’s May 2, 2012 press release states that “multiple independent sources . . . confirmed” that Vilma offered the bounty on Warner.  Ginsberg then alleges that, ultimately, the only source was Cerullo.  “Even former Saints defensive coordinator Williams, the mastermind of the alleged Bounty Program, does not contend that Vilma put a bounty on Warner,” Ginsberg writes.

The lawyer for Vilma next contends that the league knew or should have realized that Cerullo’s story was false.

“[A]s Goodell well knew,” Ginsberg writes, “Cerullo was fired for his incompetence and repeated and material lies to the Saints which caused him to miss several weeks of the 2009 season.”  (Cerullo has denied that he was absent from work, in a recent letter to Tagliabue.)

Here’s the kicker from Ginsberg:  “The Saints were so concerned about Cerullo’s stability, as Goodell also knew, that, when Cerullo was terminated, Saints head coach Sean Payton also was forced to obtain police protection at his house for fear that Cerullo would seek some type of retribution.”  (Cerullo has denied that he held a grudge against the team.)

Ginsberg likewise points out that Cerullo’s story has changed, arguing that “Goodell was well aware of these inconsistencies during the months before he imposed discipline on Vilma but nonetheless kept polluting Vilma’s reputation publicly with this fictitious allegation.”

The attack on Cerullo includes not only his motives but his accuracy.  Ginsberg writes that Cerullo allegedly told NFL investigators in November 2011 that he had taken “detailed notes” about the bounties offered as to Warner.  At the hearing before Tagliabue, Cerullo admitted that he made no notes during the defensive team meeting before the game against the Cardinals.

As to the spreadsheet of pledges for the Favre bounty a week later, Cerullo now says the numbers were “inaccurate,” and that “I don’t know what I was trying to do with this document.”

We know what Ginsberg is trying to do with his latest document.  He’s trying to show that the league trumped-up its case against Vilma based solely on the testimony of a former Saints employee who is, in Ginsberg’s apparent view, mistaken and/or corrupt.  And while Ginsberg continues to push the notion that Vilma didn’t offer $10,000 as to Vikings quarterback Brett Favre (and that, as Tagliabue concluded, if it happened it was simply “talk” and not a real offer), it’s clear that the defamation case against Goodell will be driven by the notion that the league knew or should have known that the allegation of a Warner bounty was false.

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Earl Thomas among six Seahawks on PUP/NFI lists

PHOENIX, AZ - JANUARY 27:  Earl Thomas #29 of the Seattle Seahawks addresses the media at Super Bowl XLIX Media Day Fueled by Gatorade inside U.S. Airways Center on January 27, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) Getty Images

The Seattle Seahawks are currently without both of their All-Pro safeties for the start of training camp.

While Kam Chancellor is holding out in hopes of leveraging a new contract, free safety Earl Thomas was among six players placed on the physically unable to perform and non-football injury/illness lists by the Seahawks on Friday.

Thomas is still recovering from offseason surgery to repair the torn labrum suffered in the NFC Championship game against the Green Bay Packers.

“We’re going to be really patient at this time of year,” head coach Pete Carroll said. “Not jump to a decision. He’s working hard, making great progress. We’ll wait and see how long it takes to be safe and secure before he goes out. He plays with such reckless abandon that he’s got to be ready to go 100 percent.”

In addition, the team placed receiver Paul Richardson, and cornerbacks Jeremy Lane and Tharold Simon were also placed on the physically unable to perform list. Safety Dion Bailey was placed on the non-football injury list with a hamstring issue and defensive tackle was placed on the non-football illness list as he recovers from kidney cancer.

Richardson tore his ACL against the Carolina Panthers in the Divisional Round of the playoffs. Lane tore his ACL three weeks later in the Super Bowl and also suffered a broken arm that is still problematic as well.

Richardson is ahead of schedule with his recovery. However, Lane isn’t nearly as far along.

Simon has a shoulder injury but is expected to be able to take part in the preseason.

Players can be activated from the PUP and NFI lists at any time during the preseason.

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Pete Carroll still hopeful for deal with Bobby Wagner

GLENDALE, AZ - DECEMBER 21:  Middle linebacker Bobby Wagner #54 of the Seattle Seahawks on the sidelines during the NFL game against the Arizona Cardinals at the University of Phoenix Stadium on December 21, 2014 in Glendale, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images) Getty Images

Russell Wilson received a shining new contract from the Seattle Seahawks on Friday. Meanwhile, fellow 2012 draft pick Bobby Wagner continues to wait for one of his own.

While Wilson’s contract eats up a sizable portion of Seattle’s remaining salary cap for this season, head coach Pete Carroll was adamant that it doesn’t preclude the Seahawks from signing Wagner to an extension as well.

“We’re still working, got big stuff to do today. We’re still working. We’re not finished, in case you were wondering,” Carroll said.

“We’re on it. Whoever thought that we were done with that thing that was not right. We’re on it and we’re going to keep competing to get that done. We have planned for this for a long time and nothing has changed in all that. Our guys are working at it by the hour here.”

Wagner expressed support for Wilson in his new contract, saying he was “proud and happy” for Wilson. However, Wagner appeared sufficiently upset that he was still without a new deal himself.

“It could be done, it could not be done. When I have something to sign than it will be done,” Wagner said.

Wilson and agent Mark Rodgers set a Friday deadline for negotiations for his new deal. Does Wagner have a deadline of his own in mind?

“Now. That’s my deadline,” he said.

Per the NFLPA, the Seahawks had $9.2 million in cap space before Wilson’s contract was done. Wilson’s new deal lowers Seattle’s cap room to just under $4 million. That alone could be enough to get a deal done with Wagner.

However, the salary cap is only calculated off the Top 51 contracts in the offseason. In-season, it counts all 53 active roster players, practice squad, injured reserve, PUP/NFI, etc. So effectively, the Seahawks don’t have that much usable cap space.

If Seattle were to get Wagner done, it could necessitate the need to part with other veteran players to get under the salary cap before Week 1.

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Odell Beckham autograph session nearly leads to injuries

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ - DECEMBER 28: Odell Beckham #13 of the New York Giants reacts against the Philadelphia Eagles during a game at MetLife Stadium on December 28, 2014 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.  (Photo by Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images) Getty Images

New York Giants fans eager to seek the autograph of budding superstar receiver Odell Beckham Jr. on Friday almost led to potentially dangerous situation arising after practice.

According to Tom Rock of Newsday, the large crowd seeking Beckham’s signature led to chaos with several children “brought to tears” while being pinned to the barricades keeping them in line. A woman also had a seizure during the wait, only to have fans just step over and around her. She was treated and released on-site, per the Giants.

Another teenage girl in a body brace was also crying in pain while getting shoved in her broken back.

The bleachers where the fans were standing then buckled and caved several inches. Beckham and others were then taken away from the chaos and the bleachers were cleared of fans.

Everyone appears to be OK, which is the most important thing. But the excitement around the sophomore season of Beckham is clearly palpable in the Big Apple and everyone wants a piece of their new star.

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Jets’ Devin Smith hospitalized with broken ribs

Devin Smith AP

Jets rookie receiver Devin Smith suffered broken ribs today at training camp, and the injury was serious enough that he needed to be hospitalized.

The Jets announced that Smith will stay at a local hospital overnight and is expected to miss most if not all of the rest of training camp. He suffered the broken ribs on a leaping catch in practice.

A second-round draft pick out of Ohio State, Smith was expected to compete as a rookie to be the Jets’ third receiver, behind Brandon Marshall and Eric Decker. Missing training camp will make that a lot tougher.

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Patriots release emails to NFL on leaks of false information

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Judge Richard M. Berman has told the NFL and the NFLPA to tone it down regarding the Tom Brady case. That directive apparently doesn’t apply to the Patriots.

The website created by the team in response to the 243-pages-and-nearly-as-many-flaws Ted Wells report has added a new story. It’s dubbed, “League failure to correct misinformation.”

The item consists of a chain of emails between Patriots general counsel Robyn Glaser and NFL general counsel Jeff Pash. The Patriots explain that it is “presented to illustrate the attempts by the Patriots to ask the NFL to correct initial misinformation being reported by the media and to investigate sources of such misinformation, which could only have been league personnel.”

The communications in question began on February 17, when ESPN’s Kelly Naqi reported that the Patriots tried to introduce an unapproved kicking ball into the AFC title game against the Colts. (PFT later reported what actually occurred.) The report from Naqi also contradicted, to a certain extent, the original report from Mortensen.

Patriots spokesman Stacey James complained to NFL spokesman Greg Aiello that “we have ANOTHER leak . . . resulting in a report providing details that no one else would possibly have in a story that tries to implicate a day of game employee.” James also mentioned in his email the NFL’s ongoing refusal to release the accurate PSI measurements, despite the original ESPN report that 11 of 12 Patriots footballs were two pounds under the 12.5 PSI minimum.

“I cannot comprehend how withholding the range of PSIs measured in the game is beneficial to the NFL or the Patriots,” James wrote. “I can only assume, based on the scientific evidence that has been provided to us by multiple independent scientists that the PSI numbers will be within the scientific range. If we had been provided this data within days of the original report, we could have changed the narrative of this story before it led all national news and the damage was done. It has been over 4 weeks and we still can’t get a simple detail that I assume was available the night of the AFC Championship Game!”

The next morning, Glaser forwarded the Stacey James email to Pash, reiterating the team’s earlier request that “the scope of Ted Wells’ independent investigation be expanded to include a review of actions by League personnel.” Glaser said that Pash had promised to “consult with the Commissioner” about the request, but that Pash never responded after that.

Pash replied within 30 minutes, saying that “I have no reason to think [the latest ESPN story] came from our office but I certainly do not condone leaks which I do not serve [sic] anyone’s interest.”

Glaser argued in response that “the leaks would only come from the League office as it would not serve anyone else’s purpose” and urging Pash “to bring your staff and office under control.”

“We have cooperated fully and expediently with Attorney Wells and are now seriously starting to question whether we should do that while our public image and brand continues to be unnecessarily and irreparably tarnished by the League,” Glaser wrote.

Pash later told Glaser that he has “doubts that piecemeal disclosures are likely to accomplish much,” and that “[i]f anything, I would think they are likely to prompt additional questions, additional stories, and additional irresponsible speculation and commentary.”

And then Glaser had enough.

After calling Pash’s responses “pretty disingenuous,” Glaser explained that “if the League is disclosing information that is correcting inaccuracies and misinformation that are currently are hammering away at our brand, we WELCOME the additional stories and commentary.”

“Jeff, you need to step up,” Glaser wrote. “I can’t tell you the number of times you’ve told me that you and your office work for us member clubs. It has been made resoundingly clear to us that your words are just a front. They have no substance at all. If you worked for us, you would already have released today a statement to the effect of, [‘]ESPN, you’ve got it wrong. You do not have full information, you are irresponsibly reporting information that is untrue and you need to stop. Furthermore, as you now know and report reporting yourselves, your original story that 11 of 12 balls were 2 pounds below the minimum allowable psi was just blatantly wrong, we know that because we have the information and here it is…[‘]

“I would appreciate it if you would please tell me everything you are doing, and will continue to do, to stop leaks from occurring. This is information we do not have. We know of not one thing you are doing internally to investigate the sources of the leaks and/or to curtail them. We do know that the one thing we’ve asked you to do — include the League leaks as part of the scope of the Wells investigation — has been rejected by you. So do you blame us for wondering just what the heck you mean when you said, ‘I will continue to do what I can to stop leaks from occurring’?”

The last message in the chain comes from Pash, who called Glaser’s message “personal and accusatory.” He also declined to provide a point-by-point reply, acknowledging that he works for all teams, not just the Patriots.

“Sometimes that creates tension, as it apparently has here,” Pash said.

Still, the messages make it obvious that the Patriots repeatedly asked the NFL to direct Wells to explore the leaks as part of his investigation, and that the NFL refused to do so.

That directly contradicts comments from Commissioner Roger Goodell at a press conference in May. Pressed by Tom Curran of CSNNE.com on whether Ted Wells was asked to investigate leaks (including the original 11-of-12-balls debacle), Goodell said that Ted Wells “had the opportunity to evaluate that.”

Apparently, he didn’t. But that doesn’t make it too late for Wells or someone else to make another million or so finding out who in the league office turned #DeflateGate from an act of gamesmanship at worst into the crime of the century, all by leaking blatantly false information to Chris Mortensen of ESPN.

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Charges against Aaron Kromer and son dropped

Aaron Kromer AP

On Thursday, Bills offensive line coach Aaron Kromer and his son pleaded not guilty to misdemeanor battery charges stemming from an incident in which both Kromers were accused of hitting minors during a dispute over beach chairs in Florida earlier this month.

There was another court date set for both Kromers in September, but it won’t be necessary. Bill Eddins, the State Attorney for the First Judicial Circuit in Florida, announced in a press release, via Mike Rodak of ESPN.com, Friday that the charges have been dropped against both men.

Per the release, the charges were dropped at the request of the parents of the two minor children allegedly struck during the incident. The parents said injuries sustained by their children were minor and that they didn’t wish to have their lives disrupted any further. The release also references an “amicable resolution” had been reached between the parties.

Kromer was placed on paid leave after his arrest and Bills coach Rex Ryan said before the charges were dropped on Friday that he had no update on Kromer’s status. Presumably the decision to drop the charges will lead the Bills to make a decision about whether Kromer will be back with the team this season.

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Judge asks for settlement talks in Brady case before August 12

2013 Carnegie Hall Medal Of Excellence Gala Getty Images

On Friday, the NFL and NFLPA requested an expedited schedule for the resolution of the case involving Patriots quarterback Tom Brady’s suspension with the goal of having the matter wrapped up by September 4.

Judge Richard Berman has offered a reply that suggests he’s amenable to that timeline. Berman told the two sides Friday, via the Associated Press, that the has scheduled conferences for August 12 and August 19 involving the “principles” on both sides. That would include both Brady and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who upheld Brady’s suspension after an appeal.

Berman also requested that the two sides “engage in comprehensive, good-faith settlement discussions prior to the conference on August 12.” Brady and the NFLPA said this week that they made a settlement offer to the NFL that was not countered by the league and there were several reports about settlement talks in the case before Goodell offered his decision.

Berman’s response suggests there’s a good chance of resolving the lengthy affair before the start of the season and that could mean Brady is on the field against the Steelers to start the season.

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Russell Wilson contract details begin to emerge

USA - 2014 300 dpi Chris Ware caricature of Russell Wilson, quarterback for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League. (MCT via Getty Images) Getty Images

“New money” has become one of the great fictions in the assessment of NFL contracts. But, you know, when in Rome.

For Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson, the headline is that he signed a four-year, $87.6 million extension, with a new-money average of $21.9 million. The truth is that the last year of his current contract, at a base salary of $1.542 million, has been ripped up and replaced with a new five-year, $89.1 million deal.

But since the average of the total five-year deal is $17.8 million, it won’t be characterized that way when it comes to deciding whose is bigger.

For Wilson, the details of the five-year, $89.1 million deal have begun to emerge. With one important key metric still missing.

The signing bonus, per multiple reports, is $31 million. The total guarantee, per multiple reports, is $60 million. The amount fully guaranteed of the remaining $29 million in guarantees remains unknown.

It’s a key point because the Seahawks and Wilson’s agent had been squabbling about the portion of the contract that will be fully guaranteed at signing, since future fully-guaranteed payments must be placed into escrow now. (To raise the money, Gantt could have organized a bake sale for owner Paul Allen.)

The Dolphins fully guaranteed $60 million of defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh’s contract. For Wilson, the question is whether and to what extent he has fully-guaranteed payments beyond the $31 million signing bonus.

The base salaries are, via Ian Rapoport of NFL Network, $700,000 in 2015, $12.34 million in 2016, $12.6 million in 2017, $15.5 million in 2018, and $17 million in 2019.

This makes the cap numbers $6.9 million in 2015 (plus any remaining bonus proration from his rookie deal), $18.54 million in 2016, $18.8 million in 2017, $21.7 million in 2018, and $23.2 million in 2019.

As the salary cap continues to climb, Wilson won’t last long as the second highest-paid player in the NFL. From Eli Manning to Philip Rivers to Andrew Luck to other young quarterbacks who become stars, the bar soon will be pushed to $23 million, $25 million, and beyond.

By 2019, Wilson’s salary of $17 million will be middle-of-the-pack at best. Before then, if he keeps playing like he has, Wilson likely will have another new deal.

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Ray Farmer: I gave the NFL my cell phone in Textgate investigation

Ray Farmer AP

Tom Brady refused to let the NFL see his cell phone as part of the Deflategate investigation, but Browns General Manager Ray Farmer took a different approach when he was investigated in Textgate.

Farmer, who is suspended for the first four games of the season for texting members of the Browns’ coaching staff during games, says he allowed the NFL to view his phone as part of its investigation.

“I turned over my cell phone,” Farmer said, via Cleveland.com. “Again, I made the mistake. I made the admission. It is what it is. I’ll deal with any penalty I got. If they saw fit to be lenient, than that was their call; it wasn’t mine.”

There are several differences between Farmer’s case and Brady’s. The phone was central to the violation in the case of Farmer; the texts themselves were his violations, whereas in Deflategate the NFL only thought Brady’s calls or texts might have included information about rules violations. Brady is a member of a union that has a Collective Bargaining Agreement with the NFL; Farmer is not in a labor union. And Farmer has admitted breaking the rules, whereas Brady has denied any wrongdoing.

Farmer and Brady also approached the NFL’s investigation differently. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said when suspending Farmer that he had been cooperative and that his suspension was lessened as a result, whereas Goodell criticized Brady for his lack of cooperation.

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Bashaud Breeland’s day gets worse, carted off practice field

breeland AP

We can now consider training camp season to be officially open, as we’ve had our first mention of the dreaded cart.

According to Rich Tandler of CSNWashington.com, Washington cornerback Bashaud Breeland was carted off the practice field with an apparent knee injury.

NBC 4 had video of the spill, showing a non-contact situation, where Breeland’s knee collapsed as he tried to break with a receiver.

That makes this a really bad day for the second-year corner, since he was suspended one game by the league for a marijuana possession charge last year.

While there’s no official word, they can only hope that’s all the time he misses.

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Jay Gruden: RGIII “starting to realize he has to put the work in”

cd0ymzcznguwzdbhnduynddiytjhm2yyzthlmtjjotqwyyznptbkngfkzja1ngrjzjzhntuwzjfhzdfmmtg4mtg4yzyy AP

Patience hasn’t been a word frequently associated with Robert Griffin III during his NFL career.

Whether it was immediately entering the starting lineup after going No. 2 in the 2012 draft or making the start in the 2013 season opener after a knee injury in the playoffs earlier that year, instant gratification was the goal since Griffin joined the Redskins. Coach Jay Gruden told Albert Breer of NFL Media that he’s trying a different path.

Gruden wanted Griffin to earn his spot as the starter last season and benched him during the season when Griffin failed to meet expectations, but has installed him as the starter this year with a plan to let Griffin ride out rough patches in hopes of improving.

“Let’s see what he can do, and give him some time,” Gruden said.

For the plan to succeed, Gruden believes his willingness to be patient has to be met by the same willingness from Griffin. The coach says that he’s seen signs of it from the quarterback this offseason.

“He’s not used to failure. He’s very competitive,” Gruden said. “It has an effect on him. He wants to be the best, and he’s got a long way to go to be that. But he still has the confidence and still [has] the swagger where he thinks he can be, and he’s starting to realize he has to put the work in and he has a lot to learn.”

Gruden also pointed to the need for the team to play better across the board to help Griffin succeed, but the patience is only going to extend so far. The Redskins picked up Griffin’s 2016 option, but it’s guaranteed for injury only and they aren’t likely to pay him $16.2 million if he doesn’t look closer to the quarterback they want by the time the season comes to an end.

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Vernon Davis no longer in the brand building business

San Francisco 49ers v Oakland Raiders Getty Images

When 49ers tight end Vernon Davis stayed out of the team’s offseason workouts in 2014 in hopes of getting a new deal, he said that everything he did was in “the best interest of building my brand.”

Davis didn’t get that new deal, didn’t have a good 2014 season and didn’t make any waves this offseason. On Friday, he said that he’s come up with a new approach that included firing the financial advisor who encouraged him to stay away from the team because that unnamed person “worships money.” Davis insists that he’s not laying down in front of that altar.

“That’s not who I am. That’s not what I stand for. I don’t do anything for money,” Davis said, via the Sacramento Bee. “I don’t let money represent me. That’s just not me. I play for the love of the game. And that’s the beauty of this sport — it’s that about the love, the teammates, your coaches.”

Davis says he feels “great overall” as training camp gets underway and the 49ers offense could certainly use the kind of production he provided before last season if they’re going to bounce back from last year’s showing.

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Photos show Jason Pierre-Paul in a sling with huge bandage

Pierre-Paul Getty Images

Giants co-owner John Mara said yesterday he wasn’t quite sure how many fingers Jason Pierre-Paul had at the moment.

And while none of us can be sure, the first photos of the Giants defensive end since he lost a finger in a fireworks accident don’t look good.

The New York Daily News has photos of Pierre-Paul taken in Florida, showing him in a sling with a gigantic bandage covering his right hand.

It’s hard to tell much, other than it looks like he has a boxing glove on, and doesn’t look like a guy who’ll be participating in football any time soon. We already knew he lost his right index finger, but the way he’s wrapped, it’s unclear what else is going on under there.

“We don’t know how extensive the damage is. That’s the problem,” Mara said yesterday. “I don’t know how many fingers he has.”

But at least there’s something to look at now.

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Joint NFL-NFLPA request could set stage for settlement

Moe

On Thursday, Judge Richard M. Berman made like the Honorable Moses Harry Horowitz (a/k/a Moe Howard) and clunked together the heads of the NFL and NFLPA, directing them to: (1) quit talking publicly about the #DeflateGate case; and (2) start talking to each other privately about resolving it.

The next day, instead of submitting a motion requesting a ruling by September 4 or, alternatively, an injunction allowing Brady to play until the case is resolved, NFLPA lawyer Jeffrey Kessler submitted a letter informing Judge Berman that the two sides have been talking, and that they’ve agreed on a proposed schedule for resolving the case.

They’ve agreed that the case can be concluded without depositions or document requests or testimony or the formal introduction of evidence in court. They’ve also agreed it can be resolved quickly, with the NFL and NFLPA submitting initial documents supporting their respective positions by August 7 and the parties then responding to each other’s initial submissions seven days later.

The focus then would shift to the oral argument before Judge Berman, because that would be the day on which — before, during, or after the hearing ends — he likely would call the lawyers and a key representative from each party (perhaps Roger Goodell and Tom Brady) into his chambers for the purposes of twisting arms (or gouging eyes) in an effort to settle the case.

I’ve said all along that a four-game fine, with no acknowledgment of wrongdoing from Brady, would make the most sense. Although the NFL may strenuously object to that outcome, the league could feel differently if/when Judge Berman says, “You can take no suspension and a four-game fine, or you’ll get no suspension and no fine. It’s up to you.”

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Trent Richardson lands on non-football injury list

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Trent Richardson’s fresh start with the Raiders has hit a snag.

The running back has been placed on the non-football injury list to open camp. The Raiders didn’t disclose an injury, but it’s possible that Richardson failed to pass the team’s conditioning test or has some issue that kept him from taking it.

Offensive line coach Mike Tice said earlier in the offseason that Richardson’s “quickness came around” during the team’s spring work, but Vic Tafur of the San Francisco Chronicle reported earlier this week that “whispers” around the team were that Richardson’s attempt to bounce back from his dismal stint with the Colts “is not going so well.” When he’s activated, Richardson will be competing with Latavius Murray and Roy Helu for snaps in the backfield and/or a roster spot.

Wide receiver Rod Streater was also placed on the NFI list while defensive tackle Stacy McGee and kick returner Trindon Holliday were placed on the physically unable to perform list. They join linebacker Sio Moore on that list.

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