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Brent’s official blood alcohol level comes in at 0.189 percent

Brent AP

Cowboys nose tackle Josh Brent has received forgiveness from the mother of teammate Jerry Brown, who died in a car that Brent allegedly was driving drunk.

The authorities in Texas may not be as forgiving.

According to the Associated Press, the official incident report indicates that Brent’s official blood-alcohol concentration was measured at 0.189 percent.  That’s more than twice the legal limit.

Given Brent’s size (he’s listed at 320 pounds), Brent necessarily consumed a high degree of alcohol.

Brent reportedly declined to submit to alcohol testing after the accident.  He only complied after Brown died, which removed Brent’s option to refuse to have his alcohol concentration measured.

This means that some period of time passed between the incident and the testing.  Which likely means that Brent’s concentration was even higher when he was driving.

Brent has been placed on the Cowboys’ non-football injury list.  He faces discipline from the NFL if/when his case is resolved with a finding of guilt.  Several years ago, receiver Donte’ Stallworth was suspended one year after pleading guilty to DUI manslaughter.

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27 Responses to “Brent’s official blood alcohol level comes in at 0.189 percent”
  1. darrylh1978 says: Dec 27, 2012 2:17 PM

    Let me guess he is one of those people that say they never drink and drive. Throw him in prison and make damn sure he is never able to drive ever again!!!

  2. dallascowboysdishingthereal says: Dec 27, 2012 2:20 PM

    One of the most disturbing parts of all this is that Brent had a prior record in Illinois for drunk driving. This was not a first time mistake kind of thing. He shouldn’t have been driving at all.

  3. j0esixpack says: Dec 27, 2012 2:23 PM

    Man. .19

    And it had gone down considerably before measurement. How much would a 320lb guy need to drink to near 3x the legal limit?

    That stupid drunk – which says a lot given a guy stupid enough to get in that condition in the first place.

  4. questionableprovenance says: Dec 27, 2012 2:27 PM

    Unless he can find a lawyer who can disqualify the blood-level test, he’s in trouble with the NFL regardless of the outcome of his trial. The only question remaining is: how much trouble?

  5. nyyjetsknicks says: Dec 27, 2012 2:41 PM

    How long he’s suspended from the NFL will be irrelevant. This was his second DUI and someone died. When he gets out of jail, he will not be able to play football.

  6. tannethrill says: Dec 27, 2012 2:42 PM

    Higher than RG3s interception rate

  7. leadlap says: Dec 27, 2012 2:43 PM

    This is sad.

    I hope he’s man enough plead guilty and serve his time. He made a mistake. I just hope he owns up to it.

  8. AlanSaysYo says: Dec 27, 2012 2:48 PM

    Look at him. Did you think he drank Miller 64?

  9. ppc50 says: Dec 27, 2012 2:51 PM

    His career in the NFL is over. With the previous DUI conviction and his blood alcohol content being so high, he will serve, at least, 3 years in jail, then be admitted to a halfway house, then probation. The entire situation is terribly sad. As a Cowboys fan, Brent was an up and coming player, but don’t know if good enough for a team to take a flyer on him after his legal issues and NFL suspension.

  10. thefox61 says: Dec 27, 2012 2:55 PM

    $18 – $78 is the range of cab fares from Dallas Love or DFW to surrounding cities. In retrospect this is much cheaper and less damaging then driving impaired. I’m sure if Mr. Brent was able to do it over again he would have taken a cab.
    Please, people remember this when you are ready to go home after partying. Take a cab.

  11. supporthardhits says: Dec 27, 2012 3:00 PM

    Jerry paid his bail, selected his mouthpiece, ADA will agree to a suspended sentence so that he will be ready to rock with the ‘boys in 2013!

  12. skins44 says: Dec 27, 2012 3:00 PM

    I hope he goes to jail for a few years…he deserves it. The NFL has a taxi service that you can call AND you are rich athletes…buy a limo!

    NO excuses for stupid behavior.

  13. DubZ480 says: Dec 27, 2012 3:22 PM

    Tragic and Sad situation all the way around…

  14. kpf1981 says: Dec 27, 2012 3:22 PM

    yeah, he’s in trouble. how much? probably not that much. the problem with alcohol related incidents is that it is proven that alcohol impairs your judgment, decision making, reflexes, etc. therefore, it is difficult to dish out harsh penalties when you weren’t acting yourself. couple that with a good lawyer and 3 years tops, out in 18-20 months. just saying.

  15. vdogg says: Dec 27, 2012 3:27 PM

    A man died as a result of his actions. Do your time and good luck finding a job when you get out. Playing in the NFL should never be an option for him again. Stallworth should never have been let back in again either. I am merely stating my opinion here but playing in the NFL and making the money these men do is a privilege not a right. If Goodell wants to protect the shield, you can’t allow people who have taken a life to be allowed to be part of a group of men who are held to higher standards of conduct.

  16. cruuuzcontrol says: Dec 27, 2012 3:27 PM

    The guy above is right… And even if he gets the blood test thrown out, he may still be found guilty on the basis of the responding officers’ and EMT personnel’s observations. This is a pretty rock solid case and this guy is definitely going to jail.

    But the real question is… Have the Cowboys come to their senses and realized how stupid they were to let him wander the sidelines like he was just “one of the guys” again?

  17. commonsensedude says: Dec 27, 2012 3:48 PM

    Meanwhile, as yet another NFL player is busted for a DUI, this time at the cost of a human life, the first thing that comes to Mr. Goodell’s mind when it comes to player discipline is “Bountygate.” Watch him mouth off a bit more about the New Orleans situation while ignoring the epidemic of players drinking and driving.

    And, partly because no one is all that afraid to pull a DUI in a case that doesn’t involve a fatality, it’ll keep happening. Over and over again.

    If the Commish came down half as hard on DUI cases as he does on Bountygate, questionable hits and game day clothing violations (covering up sponsor logos on tennis shoes for example), maybe we’d see this movie play less frequently.

  18. melikefootball says: Dec 27, 2012 3:57 PM

    He should go away for a long period of time no matter if he is a Dallas Cowboy or not.

  19. ebbycalvinlaloosh says: Dec 27, 2012 4:03 PM

    It doesn’t matter how many drinks it takes for a 320 pound man to get to 0.19%. The only thing that matters is that he was 0.19%. To try to extrapolate from his BAC the number of drinks he consumed is simply sensationalizing the incident.

    Also, you cannot assume that his BAC went down prior to being tested. If he was drinking heavily right before the crash, it is entirely possible that it went UP by the time he was tested, which is likely what his lawyer will argue.

  20. cowboyhater says: Dec 27, 2012 4:38 PM

    Both men made bad choices that night. One made a fatal choice, and the other made a life altering one. What shame it came to that.

  21. rootintootinnootin says: Dec 27, 2012 4:44 PM

    The drawn conclusion of him being “more drunk while driving” because time had passed between driving and the testing is not correct.

    After an individual stops consuming alcoholic beverages, the alcohol left in the stomach has yet to be absorbed and therefore BAC level will continue to rise for a period of time after consumption.

    So, while it’s too difficult to pinpoint, it is more likely that Brent was “less drunk while driving” rather than your conclusion that he had been “more drunk while driving.”

  22. bcdc26 says: Dec 27, 2012 7:28 PM

    There is one more thing about this case that I think needs to be realized and that is that Jerry Brown voluntarily got in a car with a man that he knew had been drinking heavily. Don’t get me wrong, I am not arguing for Brent’s innocence, I still feel he should be punished severely with a lengthy jail sentence and his playing days should be over in the NFL but let’s not forget that not only should you not drink and drive but if you’re aware of someone attempting to do so, it should be your responsibility to try and stop it. Unfortunately it is something that Jerry Brown failed to do and he paid the ultimate price. All the same, I hope that Brown receives the toughest penalty possible if nothing else than to make an example out of him and show that this behavior is just not going to be tolerated. And this is coming from a Cowboys fan.

  23. theblowtorchreview says: Dec 27, 2012 8:33 PM

    Well, that would explain why he couldnt drive! That’s pretty drunk, more than twice the legal limit.

    But I do agree the deceased may have a problem getting around the “assumption of risk” issue. This would be an issue in any civil proceeding his family may pursue.

    But he’s still dead either way.

  24. flipadelphia77777 says: Dec 27, 2012 8:37 PM

    The whole situation is absolutely awful. Regardless of how much jail time or what kind of punishment he gets (obviously he deserves maximum punishment, Dallas cowboy or not) this guy has to live with this burden for the rest of his life, which will be the biggest punishment of all. I work at a bar and every night there are guys so drunk trying to start their cars, when you get to a certain point you aren’t able to think clearly and are just going through the motions. As a bar, our duty is to take away the drivers keys. We have guys in the parking lot monitoring who is driving when they leave, and we are in constant contact with the waitresses, bartenders, and bouncers inside that let them know who can and cannot drive after they sign their tabs as they walk out. If we were to let someone drive home who had this type of accident, it is OUR fault and WE as a bar can get sued by the party involved. That is the law in Arizona at least. I find it hard to believe that no one working at that establishment that night saw this guy get in a car and drive away like it was nothing. Shame on both guys for making a bad decision by getting in the car and shame on the employees who aloud this to happen.

  25. ljonesy2012 says: Dec 27, 2012 10:06 PM

    His fat ass needs to be in jail for KILLING ANOTHER HUMAN BEING – This isn’t about football anymore people…Irresponsible SOB. I almost puked when I saw him on the sidelines during that game smiling, laughing. He should have been on his knees begging for forgiveness. And if he was standing right here in front of me I’d say the same damn thing right in his face. Adding a little spit to my words. He deserves NOTHING

  26. dcowboy4life says: Dec 28, 2012 9:03 AM

    flipadelphia77777 says:
    Dec 27, 2012 8:37 PM
    The whole situation is absolutely awful. Regardless of how much jail time or what kind of punishment he gets (obviously he deserves maximum punishment, Dallas cowboy or not) this guy has to live with this burden for the rest of his life, which will be the biggest punishment of all. I work at a bar and every night there are guys so drunk trying to start their cars, when you get to a certain point you aren’t able to think clearly and are just going through the motions. As a bar, our duty is to take away the drivers keys. We have guys in the parking lot monitoring who is driving when they leave, and we are in constant contact with the waitresses, bartenders, and bouncers inside that let them know who can and cannot drive after they sign their tabs as they walk out. If we were to let someone drive home who had this type of accident, it is OUR fault and WE as a bar can get sued by the party involved. That is the law in Arizona at least. I find it hard to believe that no one working at that establishment that night saw this guy get in a car and drive away like it was nothing. Shame on both guys for making a bad decision by getting in the car and shame on the employees who aloud this to happen.
    ————————————–
    This law is needed in every state. I’m not positive about it being a law in Mississippi (I no longer drink but do go to the sports bar to view games not shown on free TV) I do know if I drank 3 beers, at my size, I’d be legally drunk if not over legally. It is a shame for both these young men to make such a bad decision when help is just a phone call away and the price is much cheaper. A tragic death and a hefty fine could have easily been prevented by making a phone call. It’s very very sad.

  27. aub2005 says: Dec 28, 2012 11:29 AM

    His prior DUI conviction, being in another state, will not be admissible in this trial (should he elect to go trial). Also, some states (I do not practice in TX and therefore don’t know TX law specifically) do not have an “aggravated” DUI where there are greater penalties for higher BAC’s. He might get off legally better than you think/hope.

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