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Saban says of college football, “Maybe this is where I belong”

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Now that Nick Saban has won three BCS championships in four years and four in eight, the question once again will become whether he’ll ever be interested in taking his game back to the highest level of the sport.

For now, it sounds like he won’t be.  And it definitely sounds like he doesn’t want to talk about it.

How many times do you think I’ve been asked this question?” Saban said at a press conference the day after trouncing Notre Dame, according to the Birmingham News (via CFT).  “How many times do you think I’ve been asked to put it to rest?  And I’ve put it to rest and you continue to [ask] it. . . .  I kind of learned through that experience [with the Miami Dolphins] that maybe this is where I belong.  I’m really happy and at peace with all of that.  No matter how many times I say that, you all don’t believe it.”

He shouldn’t be surprised by that.  After all, he once notoriously declared, “I’m not going to be the Alabama coach.”

And there’s a sense that Saban isn’t satisfied to simply be the greatest coach in college football.  We think he aspires to be known as the greatest coach in all of football, which means that if an opportunity to coach a talented team with a young franchise quarterback and a favorable cap situation presents itself, Saban could try to win three titles in four years in the NFL before finally riding off into the sunset with trophies under each arm and Little Debbie cakes in every pocket.

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64 Responses to “Saban says of college football, “Maybe this is where I belong””
  1. fissels says: Jan 8, 2013 2:13 PM

    I would agree

  2. azarkhan says: Jan 8, 2013 2:14 PM

    “if an opportunity to coach a talented team with a young franchise quarterback and a favorable cap situation presents itself”

    Gee, how often does that happen? LOL

  3. mjbulls45 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:15 PM

    if ur that good,

    jump in the big boys heavyweight league,

    not a unfair fight with an all star team against a bunch of college kids.

  4. teamobijuan says: Jan 8, 2013 2:16 PM

    There goes Florio, pointing out someone saying something they ended up not doing. As if playing all your cards always is the thing to do.

  5. steelerben says: Jan 8, 2013 2:17 PM

    The only way Saban comes to the NFL is if the draft is abolished in favor of recruiting and salary caps are removed.

    Why leave somewhere where you constantly have higher quality third stringers than the other teams starters?

  6. SeenThisB4 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:18 PM

    He already failed, convincingly, in the big league. He’s good where he’s at.

  7. sewalters79 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:19 PM

    I have a feeling BAMA is doing something shady

  8. bucrightoff says: Jan 8, 2013 2:21 PM

    He has no salary cap and he gets 50 #1 picks a year at Alabama. Plus he’s a coward. He ain’t leaving,

  9. billp73 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:21 PM

    The entire NFL concurs strongly with Nick’s self-assessment.

  10. kash71 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:22 PM

    If the hammer ever comes down, you will run to the NFL like Pete Carroll did.

  11. dfeltz says: Jan 8, 2013 2:23 PM

    He’s gone. That is the kiss of death sentence. “I’m not gonna be the Alabama coach!” Write it down, take a picture, Saban is going to the NFL

  12. u2krazie says: Jan 8, 2013 2:23 PM

    Saban suffers from Delusion of Grandeur. He lacks reality. Come to the NFL and meet real men like Rex Ryan. From the desk of Dr. Laura

  13. buddysguys says: Jan 8, 2013 2:25 PM

    he cant handle the big boys, just like other teams cant handle his big boys in the college ranks.

    Right now he coaches the 33rd best team in all of football.

  14. richc111 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:25 PM

    Agreed MJBulls. he belongs where he can coach an all star team and beat up on teams that have half the talent. That is where he is happy and at peace. Not in the Pro’s where the playing field is as level as it can get.

  15. sanderscm2 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:26 PM

    “a talented team with a young franchise quarterback and a favorable cap situation”

    …sounds like the Dolphins(/Colts). Pretty sure that’s not going to happen.

  16. azarkhan says: Jan 8, 2013 2:26 PM

    mjbulls45 says: “not a unfair fight with an all star team against a bunch of college kids.”

    Spoken like a real macho man. BTW, Notre Dame was ranked #1, so what exactly was “unfair” about the game yesterday?

  17. ghostofgilchrist says: Jan 8, 2013 2:28 PM

    One of the greatest college coaches ever…and a first class dooshbag.

  18. hor2012 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:28 PM

    Keep watching. Saban is going to Cleveland. In everything he said in his post he didn’t say the words. I’m not leaving.

  19. dcfan4life says: Jan 8, 2013 2:29 PM

    Lets see, highest level of success in college, making a ton of cash, already coached in the NFL, and no NCAA investigation on anything. So why leave?

  20. beanocook says: Jan 8, 2013 2:30 PM

    The NFL is clearly not the highest level of coaching. It’s never been the most innovative, that’s for sure.

    Saban won 9 games his very first season in the NFL, w Cleo Lemon at QB no less. I wanna see Belichick try that.

    NFL fans so thin skinned and upset these college coaches keep blowing off the NFL. Face it mass market football fans, the best jobs in the sport are at the elite schools in college football. More money and more power and in historic powers more prestige.

  21. pgh15212 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:30 PM

    azarkhan says:
    Jan 8, 2013 2:14 PM
    “if an opportunity to coach a talented team with a young franchise quarterback and a favorable cap situation presents itself”

    Gee, how often does that happen? LOL

    ________________________

    Pittsburgh 2007

  22. youknowwhatsgoodforshoulderpain says: Jan 8, 2013 2:31 PM

    Given his performance at the pro level, I wholeheartedly agree.

  23. steelernationisthepinnacleofexistenceyouarenothing says: Jan 8, 2013 2:34 PM

    Why abandon a dynasty that you’ve built for a loser like the Browns? He already gets paid like an NFL coach anyway.

  24. sisqsage says: Jan 8, 2013 2:35 PM

    The way some NFL franchises are run, I wouldn’t consider it coaching “at the highest level”.
    Some of those teams (Buffalo, Tennesee Titans, Arizona Cards, Jags,) don’t pay as much as Saban makes now. Not even close. Alabama is a better run operation than those franchises will ever be.
    He’s in a better spot now than at least half of the head coaches in the NFL.
    Look at the year the Jets just went through with a goofball coach, an owner obsessed with headlines and a signing of Tebow that never made sense. Who would want to go through that circus?

  25. perezjl36 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:36 PM

    @mjbulls45
    Obviously you’re forgetting the Browns of the early ’90s. He DID play in the big boys heavyweight league under Bill Bellichick. If it weren’t for the move to Baltimore they would have one a Super Bowl probably ’96 or ’97. I am a Dolphins fan and I don’t care for Nick Saban but in his defense that Miami team would have doomed anyone who put the HC hat on.

  26. greysolon says: Jan 8, 2013 2:40 PM

    Good coach, but no evidence he is great– and there is historical evidence he won’t be good in the NFL.

    His strengths– organization, preparation, focus– are commodities widely held in The League.

    What he doesn’t bring — offensive creativity, defensive genius– are what is needed in The League.

    Without the annual influx of five star players and the automatic entry in the top 3 in the polls, he will be just another “hard-nosed coach”.

  27. azarkhan says: Jan 8, 2013 2:41 PM

    beanocook says: Saban won 9 games his very first season in the NFL, w Cleo Lemon at QB no less. I wanna see Belichick try that.

    Belichick won 11 games with Matt Cassel at QB. I wanna see Saban try that.

  28. eljefe322 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:43 PM

    The Dolphins have a franchise quarterback?

  29. tdelwalk1970 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:45 PM

    Let’s see…he can stay at Alabama and make millions, be rewarded for success by getting top recruits every year, no salary cap, AND be treated like a King for the rest of his life. Or…he can go to the NFL. Gee, that’s a tough one.

  30. eljefe322 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:46 PM

    His statements weren’t a denial. He said “maybe” this is where I belong. Why equivocate? Why say “maybe”? He said a paragraph of nonsense rather than “I have no interest in the NFL and I will turn down any interview requests I receive.” He doesn’t HAVE to say that if he doesn’t want to, but that kind of statement would put it to rest, not his wishy-washy nonsense. He’s another Larry Brown/Rick Pitino.

  31. seattle2toronto12thmanconnection says: Jan 8, 2013 2:47 PM

    kash71 says:Jan 8, 2013 2:22 PM

    If the hammer ever comes down, you will run to the NFL like Pete Carroll did.

    Run into a old, overpaid and slow roster and completely revamp it into a winning franchise with the second youngest roster in the league within three years? I wish I was that successful running away from things.

  32. wforest21 says: Jan 8, 2013 2:49 PM

    @beanocook cleo lemon played what one game that year. Saban is a hell of a coach but the fins went 6-10 the year Cleo made his cameo. He went 9-7 with headbutt frerotte

  33. blackstonevalleykettlebells says: Jan 8, 2013 2:52 PM

    if Alabama was in the NFL, they would have to pay a luxury tax for being so far over the salary cap. It’s easy to coach a national champion when your booster club is financing the whole thing.

    A man needs to understand his limitations. Stay in college Nick. You aren’t a good pro coach nor will you ever be.

  34. bedubya says: Jan 8, 2013 3:04 PM

    Really wish he would have realized where he belongs before he went to the Dolphins.

  35. omniscient48 says: Jan 8, 2013 3:06 PM

    I can’t believe what I just saw!

    A picture of Saban with a smile on his face?

    Somebody must have photoshopped this.

  36. FinFan68 says: Jan 8, 2013 3:07 PM

    He is a good coach but a lousy person. Take a look at what he did while at Miami. You can be a good leader without being a grade A jackass. At Alabama he has a ton of “first round” picks and no salary cap as long as the NCAA chooses to only investigate sparingly. In the NFL he would have no real advantage and his ego won’t allow himself to be viewed as average. He is a narcissist but he also fears failure. Not a good idea for him to go back to the NFL.

  37. silverhornet says: Jan 8, 2013 3:09 PM

    beanocook says: Saban won 9 games his very first season in the NFL, w Cleo Lemon at QB no less. I wanna see Belichick try that.

    Cleo Lemon started one game for Saban, the last game Saban coached for Miami, at Indy.

  38. countduku says: Jan 8, 2013 3:19 PM

    After the way he left his last NFL job, you could only hope he never gets another chance.

  39. naes says: Jan 8, 2013 3:29 PM

    “if an opportunity to coach a talented team with a young franchise quarterback and a favorable cap situation presents itself”

    That could be the Detroit Lions next year.

  40. randomcommenter says: Jan 8, 2013 3:33 PM

    Saban failed in the Big Ten at Michigan State where they have rules against oversigning and kids have to go to class. He failed in the NFL where you have limited draft picks.

    Saban only thrives in the SEC where he can cheat the recruiting rules by oversigning and Bama would admit a ham sandwich if it ran a fast 40.

    Top WR recruit Robert Foster from Pittsburgh area just surprisingly picked Bama over Pitt. His mother said it was because Pitt told him his grades weren’t good enough and he’d have to do a year of prep school. Bama said, no problem, welcome aboard son, we’ll get you eligible.

    Then there are the kids on the roster who are about to have their scholarships pulled and given to new recruits.

    If a Big Ten school signs a kid and he’s not as good as hey thought, they’re stick with him for 4 years. Not in the SEC. In the SEC they will pull that kid’s scholarship and give it to a new recruit. The kid could have excellent grades and be a pretty good player, but if he’s not a star, he’s gone.

    Saban knows he can’t win without this advantage.

  41. perezjl36 says: Jan 8, 2013 3:34 PM

    I still think if Saban had more years on him he could win a Super Bowl. He came from the Belichick tree. Look at what Belichick produced in Cleveland. All those head coaches and GM’s. Given enough time, patience and money, I think Saban could be successful in the playoffs if not win a superbowl.

  42. thelastpieceofcheese says: Jan 8, 2013 3:43 PM

    Saban is on his way of being the greatest coach ever…of MINOR league football.

  43. randomguy9999 says: Jan 8, 2013 4:09 PM

    I’ll point out the reality that when he was at the Phins…. he didn’t like the personalities and they didn’t like him…..

    he’s a college coach and it’s a whole different ballgame managing millionaires over managing students who are angling for the NFL….. also, he’s already proven he can’t manage professionals….

    I pity da foo owner that hires him….

  44. ilovefoolsball says: Jan 8, 2013 4:15 PM

    The question should be “will he” not “should he”.
    Asking “should he” is going to give biased responses. Someone who is a fan of an SEC team will always say he should go so he can get the hell out of that conference.

  45. stevent92 says: Jan 8, 2013 4:22 PM

    In college, you essentially only have minimal oversight in the Board of Regents looking over your shoulder. At a place like Alabama, this equates to zero oversight, as Saban is BMOC. You can recruit who you want and be the Big Boss with no one staring you down. Saban could coach at Alabama for 10+ more years at $5M per year.

    In the NFL, you’ve got Owners, General Managers, and much more media & fan scrutiny. Win in 3 years or else. You cannot recruit like you can in college as the draft, parity and salary cap make it difficult to run the table every year.

    Some guys are just much, much better suited to the College game, as they have unlimited power and 20 year olds that don’t talk back. Bobby Petrino learned this the hard way and bolted after 13 games. Saban after 2 years. He belongs in the NCAA.

  46. randomcommenter says: Jan 8, 2013 4:27 PM

    “The question should be “will he” not “should he”.
    Asking “should he” is going to give biased responses. Someone who is a fan of an SEC team will always say he should go so he can get the hell out of that conference.”

    —————-

    SEC fans want him to stay. They have a creepy Jonestown like cult atmosphere where they actually root for their rivals to win for the glory of the SEC. They chant SEC more than they chant for their own teams.

    Michigan fans would root for Ohio State to lose by 100 in the championship because they are rivals. SEC fans get some sort of vicarious thrill from seeing their supposed rivals win. It’s pathetic really.

  47. ubummer says: Jan 8, 2013 4:47 PM

    Until Saban returns to the NFL:
    Carroll > Saban = coward

  48. mvp43 says: Jan 8, 2013 4:51 PM

    He’s got a legitimate chance to at least tie Bear Bryants 6 national titles. I don’t think he’s going anywhere…

  49. paul82461 says: Jan 8, 2013 5:11 PM

    What a joke, of course all high school recruits want to play in the SEC, especially Alabama,LSU etc. whywould they go elsewhere. Is like getting the first 10 picks inthe high school draft every year. Real tough to put a #1 team together, it practically coaches itself.

  50. floriosbigtoe says: Jan 8, 2013 5:49 PM

    He’s not going anywhere, at least not any time soon. The guy can’t win where the talent is equal. Simple as that. And you can’t boss around a bunch of grown men that are millionaires like you can a bunch of kids.

  51. ravenseattheirownpoop says: Jan 8, 2013 6:43 PM

    He will never go to the pro’s again. He can’t get all the best players. He will actually have to coach and he can’t do that. All he can do is win with all the 5 stars

  52. perezjl36 says: Jan 8, 2013 7:02 PM

    @randomcommenter
    SEC fans chant for the SEC conference when they play in a bowl game. We would like to go undefeated as a conference in bowl season if we could. We don’t chant “ROLL TIDE” we chant SEC. We would love to watch Bama crush Michigan in a bowl game rather then have to listen to BIG 10 fans talk trash about how they beat an SEC team. I promise, if your conference (probably BIG 10) could win 7 titles in a row you’d probably want that streak to continue and root for the Gophers if thats what it came down to. Point is, if the tables were turned I would have probably been the one to post a dumb comment like yours and act like I don’t want our conference to do well in the name of “rivalries”.

  53. Deb says: Jan 8, 2013 9:04 PM

    First, the pro and college games are separate but equal. Lombardi didn’t need to excel as a college coach to be “the greatest,” nor did Bear Bryant need to excel as a pro coach to be “the greatest.” They were iconic in their individual sports. If Nick Saban chooses to remain in the NCAA and continue his run to greatness, it won’t matter that he never won a Super Bowl.

    Second, when he says he’s at peace where he is, it may be because he’s at peace where he is. You know … like you’re at peace as a football commentator in a way you weren’t at peace as a lawyer.

    And for those who say an SEC team like Bama practically coaches itself because all those great players want to go there … I’m a Bama fan who went through those 17 years without a title. Nick is a great recruiter, a great motivator, a great game-planner. College teams don’t man and coach themselves anymore than pro teams do. But, ah, thanks for that insight.

  54. Deb says: Jan 8, 2013 10:25 PM

    The pro and college games are separate but equal. Lombardi didn’t need to excel as a college coach to be “the greatest,” nor did Bear Bryant need to excel as a pro coach to be “the greatest.” They were iconic in their individual sports. If Nick Saban chooses to remain in the NCAA and continue his run to greatness, it won’t matter that he never won a Super Bowl.

    Second, when he says he’s at peace where he is, it may be because he’s at peace where he is. You know … like you’re at peace as a football commentator in a way you weren’t at peace as a lawyer.

    And for those who say an SEC team like Bama practically coaches itself because all those great players want to go there … I’m a Bama fan who went through those 17 years without a title. Nick is a great recruiter, a great motivator, a great game-planner. College teams don’t man and coach themselves anymore than pro teams do. But, ah, thanks for that insight.

  55. Deb says: Jan 8, 2013 10:25 PM

    First, the pro and college games are separate but equal. Lombardi didn’t need to excel as a college coach to be “the greatest,” nor did Bear Bryant need to excel as a pro coach to be “the greatest.” They were iconic in their individual sports. If Nick Saban chooses to remain in the NCAA and continue his run to greatness, it won’t matter that he never won a Super Bowl.

    Second, when he says he’s at peace where he is, it may be because he’s at peace where he is. You know … like you’re at peace as a football commentator in a way you weren’t at peace as a lawyer.

    And for those who say an SEC team like Bama practically coaches itself because all those great players want to go there … I’m a Bama fan who went through those 17 years without a title. Nick is a great recruiter, a great motivator, a great game-planner. College teams don’t man and coach themselves anymore than pro teams do. But thanks for that insight.

  56. Deb says: Jan 8, 2013 10:25 PM

    First, the pro and college games are separate but equal. Lombardi didn’t need to excel as a college coach to be “the greatest,” nor did Bear Bryant need to excel as a pro coach to be “the greatest.” They were iconic in their individual sports. If Nick Saban chooses to remain in the NCAA and continue his run to greatness, it won’t matter that he never won a Super Bowl.

    Second, when he says he’s at peace where he is, it may be because he’s at peace where he is. You know … like you’re at peace as a football commentator in a way you weren’t at peace as a lawyer.

    And for those who say an SEC team like Bama practically coaches itself because all those great players want to go there … I’m a Bama fan who went through those 17 years without a title. Nick is a great recruiter, a great motivator, a great game-planner. College teams don’t man and coach themselves anymore than pro teams do. But … thanks for that insight.

  57. Deb says: Jan 8, 2013 10:26 PM

    Really? “We” get the sense that he wants the be the greatest coach in all of football? Did you do the Carnac thing and touch a photo of Saban to your forehead?

    First, the pro and college games are separate but equal. Lombardi didn’t need to excel as a college coach to be “the greatest,” nor did Bear Bryant need to excel as a pro coach to be “the greatest.” They were iconic in their individual sports. If Nick Saban chooses to remain in the NCAA and continue his run to greatness, it won’t matter that he never won a Super Bowl.

    Second, when he says he’s at peace where he is, it may be because he’s at peace where he is. You know … like you’re at peace as a football commentator in a way you weren’t at peace as a lawyer.

    And for those who say an SEC team like Bama practically coaches itself because all those great players want to go there … I’m a Bama fan who went through those 17 years without a title. Nick is a great recruiter, a great motivator, a great game-planner. College teams don’t man and coach themselves anymore than pro teams do. But, ah, thanks for that insight.

  58. patpatriot7 says: Jan 9, 2013 11:38 AM

    Hey Deb,

    Say it again, and you might actually believe it.

    You left out ONE very important point. He doesn’t care about the young men he brings in to Alabama. Each Div 1 college team is allowed to have a total of 85 recruits. That’s an average of 21 or 22 per season. How, then do you justify the 101 that Saban has brought in in the previous four years? What about greyshirting where he takes away a scholarship he has offered to a player who commits early and gives it to a better player he recruits later – even if that student is an EE who is already attending school? How do you take in kids knowing that, even at Alabama, some of them will not qualify? How do you tell a kid, we are taking your scholarship but you can stay in school if you pay your own way and practice with the team. Then, if you can beat out someone who currently has a scholarship we will offer you one next year – or you can go to a junior college and play now?
    And that’s not unique to Alabama, but typical of teams – and coaches – in the S(kip) E(ducation and) C(lasses) ranks. Saban is the best at getting away with this sleezy, immoral activity – but not by much (see Les Miles). It didn’t take TAMU long to figure it out. They already have 36 recruits committed – and still counting.
    You’re right, as long as he can continue to outsmart the NCAA. However, they caught up with U$C, Ohio State and Oregon; so its only a matter of time! So much for insight!

  59. Deb says: Jan 9, 2013 1:52 PM

    Hey, patpatriot7 …

    LOL … what can I say? Hiccups :)

    As for the oversigning … you won’t like my answer: I won’t make excuses for it because I don’t have a problem with it. It’s not something Saban is doing on the sly. Oversigning is a common practice among many teams–particularly in the SEC. Steve Spurrier at South Carolina is the oversigning king. And since Saban stays within SEC–and NCAA–rules, I don’t worry about the infractions committee coming to call.

    Here’s the thing, Pat: Where would these kids be if they weren’t signed by Bama? Back home going to a JUCO or working at Mickey D’s. The oversigning gives them a shot at the big time that they wouldn’t have otherwise. They wouldn’t have any shot at all. If they do the work and prove themselves to Nick, they’ve got a chance to make the squad on one for one of the biggest programs in NCAA football–a chance that could get them invited to the Combine one day.

    If they’re not team material … well, the worst that can happen is they wind up right back where they started … going to a JUCO or working at Mickey D’s. The difference is that Saban knocks some of these kids back and brings them up later … or he helps them get signed with FCS teams. They wind up better off than they ever would have been if they’d just been among the guys who were recruited but not quite good enough.

  60. patpatriot7 says: Jan 9, 2013 3:37 PM

    What can you say? Simple: NOTHING.

    It’s not OK with the NCAA. This has been described as an “epidemic” by the NCAA committee and they are trying to tackle the problem. Every major sports journalism site, exept ESPN (surprise) has frequently written about this topic. I don’t know why you are arguing.

    SEC schools are signing 20+ more players than other schools every four years. That’s basically an extra full class every four years than most schools. If you want to just assume they are losing those players through natural attrition, fee free. This year, Alabama had eight seniors left from a class of 25+. Some went pro early, but not 17 of them! What happened to the rest? That’s almost 70% of the class that are not around for their senior year. That can’t be just coincidence.

    Furthermore, if Alabama is working within the rules, why does the University not only refuse to disclose scholarship numbers, but blacks out the scholarship numbers of their annual report?

    We’re dealing with 17-19 young men here. I can’t believe that anyone could or would try to justify these unethical, heartless and unfair practices by Alabama as simply the “collateral damage” necessary to win football games. If so, shame on you!

  61. patpatriot7 says: Jan 9, 2013 4:55 PM

    If they end up working at Mickey D’s, then please tell me how they qualify to get into Alabama in the first place? Do they major in “food services” or “culinary arts?”
    The best way to solve the problem is simple. If you give out a scholarship you must offer it for the four years the athlete is in school, unless he leaves on his own. If he is forced off the team (formerly greyshirting) or pushed to a junior college; that scholarship cannot be used until the year after his graduating class.

  62. dallascowboysdishingthereal says: Jan 9, 2013 10:10 PM

    It is where you belong Saban. The NFL has rules in place to make acquiring talent a level playing field. That’s why you failed in Miami.

    At Alabama you can roll up teams with lesser talent every Saturday.

  63. fishyinalittledishy says: Jan 10, 2013 7:36 AM

    I don’t think there is another sport in the world that has such a massive support for both codes which basically is the same game. Except one is for very young mostly gifted boys and the other is for the best of the best of these youngsters to develop into men with more power speed etc etc which equals the very highest level from a tech standpoint. Watching Ryan Tannehill on hard knocks not totally in tune with how the Nfl divs are set up was very interesting for me coming from the UK and totally into the Nfl 30 years or so. I always knew college football was powerful, historically enshrined and set in its ways but never ever did I think that that some of the football masses was split nfl / college and follow or respect both. Saban will never go down as a true great because he quit the nfl for the more comfortable ways of collegiate. He probably couldn’t care less what he goes down as he is a great college coach probably the greatest but the Nfl is the level by which you are ultimately judged because its the bollocks

  64. Deb says: Jan 10, 2013 2:15 PM

    @patpatriot7 …

    I’m not arguing. You asked my opinion and I gave it. And all those media outlets couldn’t be writing about oversigning if it weren’t a matter of public record, now could they? I know a lot of kids who are smart enough to be in college but who don’t have the grades to qualify for academic scholarships. And if they don’t have the money to pay for a Division IA education, they’ll wind up at a JUCO, working for Mickey Ds while they struggle to get a degree. Is this news to you? This way they’re getting a shot to play for a major football program. I think getting a shot they wouldn’t otherwise have is a good thing.

    I didn’t say the NCAA was okay with it. I said these schools are acting within the letter of the law–as the rules go. If you don’t like that, change the rules.

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