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Lattimore “cool with rule,” thinks Clowney is too

Marcus Lattimore, Victor Hampton AP

Former South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore is Exhibit A for those who think South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney should skip his third year of college football.

Lattimore might have been the top running back prospect in this year’s draft, before a gruesome knee injury in October made his draft stock freefall, and cost him many thousands of dollars.

But Lattimore told NFL.com’s Jeff Darlington he thought the NFL’s rule requiring players be three years removed from high school before they can enter the draft was a good one.

“I feel like it’s more of a maturity thing, as far as waiting three years,” Lattimore said. “I feel like it’s fair, I really do. I feel like three years is the right thing to do.

“It’s a matter of maturing, getting stronger. If you leave after your second year, you’re 19 years old playing against 30 year olds.”

Lattimore said he was “cool with the rule,” even if he might have been ready for such a leap himself after last season.

And he thinks Clowney accepts the rule as well, even though it keeps him out of a draft he might have been the top pick in.

“He’s a great player,” Lattimore said. “He’s going to be the No. 1 pick overall. But he’s a guy that, he can’t sit out a year. That’s what kind of person he is. I mean, he’s not going to miss a year of football.”

Perhaps not, but he’s also not going to do much to elevate his draft stock either, which means it can only go down from here.

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8 Responses to “Lattimore “cool with rule,” thinks Clowney is too”
  1. philyeagles5 says: Feb 15, 2013 1:37 PM

    smart guy. thats exactly why the rules in place.

  2. albertmn says: Feb 15, 2013 1:44 PM

    When someone is as much of a seemingly sure thing as Clowney, can’t they get insurance against injury? I would think they might even be able to use future earnings to pay it, as they likely don’t have much money in most cases. Essentially, it would be the insurance company betting on them staying healthy. If they stay healthy and get the big contract, the insurance company gets paid. If they get hurt, the insurance pays the player.

  3. dallascowboysdishingthereal says: Feb 15, 2013 1:48 PM

    Lattimore has a great attitude about it all. But I think players should be able to go to the NFL when they choose.

  4. harrisonhits2 says: Feb 15, 2013 1:57 PM

    ““He’s a great player,” Lattimore said. “He’s going to be the No. 1 pick overall. But he’s a guy that, he can’t sit out a year. That’s what kind of person he is. I mean, he’s not going to miss a year of football.”

    Perhaps not, but he’s also not going to do much to elevate his draft stock either, which means it can only go down from here.”

    He’ll still be a first round pick and with the rookie scale there isn’t anywhere near the difference between what the 1st overall pick and mid first round picks get paid as there used to be. Clowney is going to get well paid no matter where he falls in the first round.

  5. jerseyshoregiant says: Feb 15, 2013 2:25 PM

    albertmn says: Feb 15, 2013 1:44 PM

    When someone is as much of a seemingly sure thing as Clowney, can’t they get insurance against injury? I would think they might even be able to use future earnings to pay it, as they likely don’t have much money in most cases. Essentially, it would be the insurance company betting on them staying healthy. If they stay healthy and get the big contract, the insurance company gets paid. If they get hurt, the insurance pays the player.

    ——————————-
    No such thing as a “sure thing” in the NFL and there are numerous examples that back it up.

    I believe the insurance he could get would be if he has a Career ending injury not simply just an injury that might cause him to drop in the draft.

  6. vicnocal says: Feb 15, 2013 3:11 PM

    NFL teams should be able to regulate themselves. It’s kind of like a “free market” thing vs government regulations telling businesses what they can or can’t do. Ultimately, businesses will make decisions that are in their best interests.

    Example: A 19-year old wants to come out for the Draft after one college season, and even though he shows potential, he might not be totally physically or mentally mature. Fine, that will be reflected in his draft status. Teams will probably take him in the 4th or 5th round or something, instead of in the 1st or 2nd if he came out two years and 20 lbs later. Teams can decide for themselves whether it’s worth a draft pick or not. If teams do draft him, then the notion that he’s not ready for the NFL is rendered bogus, because they obviously think that he is, otherwise they woulnd’t have drafted him at all.

  7. myeaglescantwin says: Feb 15, 2013 3:12 PM

    i love how everyone just assumes there is insurance you can buy against injuries.

    First off, how is he going to cover the premiums?
    Secondly, what insurance agency is going to issue a multi million dollar insurance policy to a kid that plays a contact sport with a high risk of injury?

    Talent is talent. This rule is a joke
    The decision should be up to the athlete

  8. Maurice Barksdale says: Feb 15, 2013 5:01 PM

    There should be a rule made for special cases like Clowney. Something where the NFL and the player’s union could give an truly elite prospect like Clowney a special exception to enter the draft.

    Of course not every 19 year old is physically or mentally ready to play in the NFL, but not every 22 year old is either. It depends on the individual. Clowney is clearly more than ready physically.

    If 19 year olds can fight in Afghanistan, then they can certianly play in the NFL.

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