Skip to content

Clowney says he never considered sitting out

Clowney Getty Images

South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney is ready for the NFL.  But thanks to an NFL rule aimed at protecting the free farm system known as college football, he can’t join the NFL until he is three years removed from high school.

Clowney, who reportedly ran the 40 recently in 4.5 seconds (or maybe it was a 4.19), tells Tom Rinaldi of ESPN that Clowney never considered taking 2013 off to protect his body for the next level.

“My mom was the first person to call me, and was like, ‘I hope you ain’t talking about doing nothing crazy like this.’  I’m not gonna do that.  Nobody would like me here in South Carolina,” Clowney said, laughing.

“I’m not leaving school.  I don’t really think I’m taking a big risk.  You can get hurt anywhere.  I can get in a car accident any given day outside of playing football.  I can trip off a curb and tear my ACL.  Anything can happen to you.  It don’t matter where you at you can get hurt.  You can get hurt at your own house, fall, trip and fall.  I’ve been doing this since I was five years old, playing football.  If it’s my time to get hurt, it’s my time to get hurt.  I’m just gonna play like I’ve been playing.”

He’s right, but the normal, everyday risk of injury is slightly higher when playing major college football.  And the point was, is, and will be that, for a guy who isn’t getting paid and who is playing football to ultimately get paid, playing for free when he’s already at a point where he’d enter the NFL at the top of the draft pool creates a grossly unnecessary risk.

We like Clowney’s attitude.  But most kids that age would feel that way.  Clowney, and everyone else in his position, needs someone who understands the real risks to give him objective advice that takes into account the player’s best interests, and no one else’s.

We won’t hold our breath, or any other bodily function, waiting for his head coach to have that conversation with him.  And that’s not a specific rip on Steve Spurrier.

We’d be shocked if any Division I head coach would give advice to a player that makes the coach’s team weaker in the coming season.

Permalink 26 Comments Feed for comments Latest Stories in: Home, Rumor Mill
26 Responses to “Clowney says he never considered sitting out”
  1. tribefever says: Mar 6, 2013 8:09 AM

    If only he had the all knowing florio to advise him of what he should do.
    For someone who supposedly loves football you sure have spent a lot of time suggesting people shouldn’t play the game.
    Get off your soap box.

  2. ccjcsr says: Mar 6, 2013 8:18 AM

    His pay day will come!

  3. theralph2012 says: Mar 6, 2013 8:20 AM

    Remember when college football was about college students…playing football?

  4. thedreamcomparison says: Mar 6, 2013 8:23 AM

    its not like hes the first player to ever be in this position…

  5. kegowhisky says: Mar 6, 2013 8:25 AM

    If all players follow Florio’s words, no one will be in the college game after their freshman year. Good on Clowney; I hope he stays healthy and continues to dominate in the NFL.

  6. goraidersgospurs says: Mar 6, 2013 8:35 AM

    I would love for this guy to be a Raider, but that would mean another losing season!!!

  7. steeelfann says: Mar 6, 2013 8:36 AM

    Maybe it is you who need to understand. Quit stating that Clowney’s attitude results from his age. Ya know, believe it or not, money is not the end all to happiness.

    Maybe he just loves being part of his collegiate team and would not miss it, even for a fat paycheck. Maybe his value system is not what yours is (maybe his is better?) .

    Please, stop basing every decision that is made in your articles on money. Or sexuality. Or ability to file a lawsuit. Or a concussion.

  8. jeremyb91 says: Mar 6, 2013 8:37 AM

    Have you ever considered what happens to players who take a full year off? Clowney may have all the talent in the world, but taking a full year off would not help him get drafted first overall in 2014. It would make him rusty and teams would question his overall committment to the game.

  9. raiderufan says: Mar 6, 2013 8:43 AM

    If he doesn’t meet one running back in the backfield and blow his head up this would be the dumbest topic ever. Some people actually watched him and saw an absolute freak athelete that tends to disappear at times. In that game alone he made that play and got 4 more run of the mill tackles.

    Of his total 12.5 sacks last season 4.5 came against Clemson.

    I like the kid…especially after watching him in the Rinaldi interview…but WAY to many kids burn out as soon as a game as physical as the NFL make them millionaires and the personal business is their body.

    Just let him be and let him get a free education at a major institution playing in an elite conference while learning more about the game AND most importantly…having fun.

  10. gross21 says: Mar 6, 2013 8:46 AM

    Way to sensor to comments, you guys are allowed to post whatever you want, but a thoughtful, truthful post isn’t shown. Thought we lived in America.

  11. EJ says: Mar 6, 2013 8:59 AM

    He is supposed to be the next L.T. or Bruce Smith, but better. I bet he is drafted at #1 regardless of injury or not. Whoever holds the first pick of the draft next year will have a great DE or a bunch of options for a trade.

  12. allidoiswin55 says: Mar 6, 2013 9:02 AM

    Good!!!!!!!!!!!! because that is totally stupid and would open the biggest can of football worms imaginable.

    MAYBE HE can play right now but what’s to say there wouldn’t be another guy thinking the same thing about himself but isn’t as ready. You’d have kids sitting out that are not worthy or would turn the draft into the risky type drafts the Nba use to have.

    You aren’t physically developed and emotionally developed enough at age 19 or 20 to play in the NFL. PERIOD!

    This is a win now league, the NBA is not except for like 3 franchises. Taking risks are what the Nfl avoids!!

    This would have drastically changed the college game and the boom or bust factor!

  13. chris6523 says: Mar 6, 2013 9:19 AM

    But thanks to an NFL rule aimed at protecting the free farm system known as college football, he can’t join the NFL until he is three years removed from high school.

    __________________________________

    So what is the solution to this problem? I suppose you could talk about paying college athletes, but if you pay the football player on scholarship, you are going to have to pay the woman’s soccer player on scholarship. At that point, the money ends up getting spread so thin that it doesn’t amount to much at all. Keep in mind that in just division 1A (I refuse to refer to it as FBS) you have about 10,000 kids on scholarship.

    So is the solution a minor league football system? You’ll have kids coming straight out of high school to make, what, probably about $10,000 a year or less to take the same risk they are taking in college. Who would advise a kid to play football for that paltry sum when a fully paid scholarship would be available.

    As far as the three year out of high school rule is concerned, I can guarantee if the rule were abolished 90% of the kids coming out early would flame out.

  14. modhairken says: Mar 6, 2013 9:21 AM

    What exactly should Spurrier say, “hey, try not to hurt yourself”? Stop whining for the guy who isn’t asking you to whine. the NBA rule has decimated college basketball. The college athletes can borrow money to buy disability insurance and they receive tuition, books, room and board. If you’re so concerned about how badly they have it, go lobby Congress.

  15. tv426 says: Mar 6, 2013 9:31 AM

    I’m so tired of people calling college a “free farm system”! Like people don’t have to go to college in order to be considered for employment in other fields?

    That is what college is – expecting it to be different for sports is absurd (which is why baseball needs to make that adjustment – how many lives are ruined by a high school player being drafted into baseball and never making it to the bigs? That is a disservice to the kids, not baseball.)

    Football has every right to do what it is doing – demanding that someone be of proper age to be considered for entry into the league and to use the opportunities of college athletics to the betterment of the players and the league.

  16. rajbais says: Mar 6, 2013 9:58 AM

    NCAA, if you want your players to stay in school let them be compensated better and policed less.

    At least let them earn outside income while they are in school because they can at least help their family. All athletes help their families and no one had to see the movie “Broke” To know that. Worst of all the movie show that family is not even the biggest money dryer out of all things players put their expenses into.

    Is a player being a brat when he or she buys a car for his or her mother while in college and she cries in happiness after seeing it?

    It is actually a beautiful thing because a family was helped. A family cannot get richer or more well off while a player Is under a NCAA scholarship or set Of the extreme restrictions. And I thought we wanted families to prosper in this country.

    If the NCAA and people who are involved in bowl games take the tax exempt money and put it into personal luxuries, something that has been reported in Yahoo sports and ‘Real sports with Bryant Gumbel’ what does that make them?

    Especially when they are the ones who put the extreme police state rules in the NCAA for the players.

    The way that players are being treated in the NCAA is not that different from the way that women were being treated before they were given the rights that they deserve. Like women these players are American civilians and Are being told that your privileges are better when they are minimal. People found it okay for women to always stay at home and not work the same jobs that mended. Now Everyone is fine with them working in the same jobs as men.

    Is it that wrong for players to gain more security and have more for their families? Is it wrong for a player to work at a job outside of campus and not have his wages cut off?

    I think not Because when it is not that great of a privilege and way too risky to be a college football player today I think having alternatives would be a great thing for people like Clowney!

  17. pilot2011 says: Mar 6, 2013 10:01 AM

    You made this story up so you could get more viewers of this website. Just like you made up the story about Manti Teo being questioned from “nfl team execs”. And how you make up stories of nfl teams planning to take your alma mater’s qb in the top 10 of the draft.

    its quite obvious you just stir up random thoughts and decide to push unmerited rumors. Its crappy journalism. No wonder you are originally a lawyer.

    I have been reading this site since 2004 and have shown so many others to it. But over the last few years you have gone out of control trying to be bigger, better, and more profitable by stirring the pot.

    ps… I bet you delete this post. You have become scared to have others voice opinions that are opposite of yours.

  18. taintedlombardis says: Mar 6, 2013 10:06 AM

    Of course he never considered if. He’s already getting paid.

    $EC.

  19. godofwine330 says: Mar 6, 2013 10:29 AM

    I just pumped up his attributes in NCAA football that I just got on PS3. He is going to be a BEAST! Just as long as he doesn’t drink his own kool-aid.

  20. gochargersgo says: Mar 6, 2013 10:31 AM

    For every Clowney there is 1,000 kids who think they are ready for the NFL and are not. The rule is not perfect but please stop pretending like any of your ideas are actually better Florio.

  21. ningenito78 says: Mar 6, 2013 10:35 AM

    What needs to happen is the NFL should drop the mandatory 3 years after high school rule. Either start a minor league football league FUNDED by the NFL or allow teams to have a developmental squad of like 3-5 players. The players on this squad would not count toward the active roster and teams would have, say, 2 years to promote them to the active roster or release them. Also any kid that gets picked up by an NFL team loses a year of elgibility at the college level but can still return if they can’t hack the NFL. There are very very few young men that would be ready for the NFL before the 3 years out of high school and teams would realize that and agents would realize teams know that so you wouldn’t have a ton of agents pushing kids to go too soon like you do in the NBA. The fact a guy like Clowney has to eat up a scholarship and play another year in college really isn’t fair. There has to be a way for the few kids that could play in the NFL early to play.

  22. qdog112 says: Mar 6, 2013 12:00 PM

    You almost have to feel sorry for those naive college players. Clowny could run for governor now, but the second his eligibility ends, not only will the people not like him, they won’t even know him.

    The fact that he cares about them liking him is a little sad, but commendable at the same time.

  23. rajbais says: Mar 6, 2013 12:05 PM

    NCAA, if you want your players to stay in school let them be compensated better and policed less.

    At least let them earn outside income while they are in school because they can at least help their family. All athletes help their families and no one had to see the movie “Broke” To know that. Worst of all the movie show that family is not even the biggest money dryer out of all things players put their expenses into.

    Is a player being a brat when he or she buys a car for his or her mother while in college and she cries in happiness after seeing it?

    It is actually a beautiful thing because a family was helped. A family cannot get richer or more well off while a player Is under a NCAA scholarship or set Of the extreme restrictions. And I thought we wanted families to prosper in this country.

    If the NCAA and people who are involved in bowl games take the tax exempt money and put it into personal luxuries, something that has been reported in Yahoo sports and ‘Real sports with Bryant Gumbel’ what does that make them?

    Especially when they are the ones who put the extreme police state rules for NCAA players.

    The way that players are being treated in the NCAA is not that different from the way that women were being treated before they were given the rights that they deserve. Like women these players are American civilians and Are being told that your privileges are better when they are minimal. People found it okay for women to always stay at home and not work the same jobs that mended. Now Everyone is fine with them working in the same jobs as men.

    Is it that wrong for players to gain more security and have more for their families? Is it wrong for a player to work at a job outside of campus and not have his wages cut off?

    I think not Because when it is not that great of a privilege and way too risky to be a college football player today I think having alternatives would be a great thing for people like Clowney!

  24. oxrageous says: Mar 6, 2013 3:44 PM

    I personally think Florio’s relentless assertion for this kid to walk away from his teammates and quit on the school that gave him a scholarship to be disgusting.

  25. malachiofcourse says: Mar 6, 2013 5:20 PM

    thank the football gods jadeveon clowney isn’t draft eligible, that guy scares me. i’d hate for the KC Chiefs to have gotten him… -a broncos fan4life

  26. dallascowboysdishingthereal says: Mar 6, 2013 11:08 PM

    You can tell by Clowney’s grammar or lack of it, that he is not a serious college student. He is majoring in Pre-NFL. Just let him go to the NFL already.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!