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Jaguars unveil new uniforms

Jags

The Jaguars unveiled their new uniforms Tuesday, during a presentation full of flash and marketing buzzwords.

And while tastes in clothing are subjective, I think my sartorial expertise allows me to say with authority — these things are kind of ugly.

The helmets fade from matte black to gold, which is vaguely interesting. And the new logo looks better than the old one, for sure.

But from the futuristic fonts of the numbers (apparently it’s edgy and modern and aggressive) to the mishmash of color combinations, they still look like something out of Rollerball or the XFL.

All that said, there’s one important fact I’d be remiss to not point out: As an old, nonpartisan, non-gear purchaser, the NFL, the Jaguars and Nike could give a rip what I think.

Photo credit: Jaguars Twitter account

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Falcons trading for Andy Levitre

New York Jets v Tennessee Titans Getty Images

Guard Andy Levitre fell out of favor with the Titans this offseason and was thought to be on the roster bubble with Tennessee dropping to 53 players by Saturday afternoon’s deadline.

The bubble has burst for Levitre with the Titans, but, as someone may well have said at some point, when one bubble bursts another opens.

On Twitter Friday, Levitre tweeted “#RiseUp,” which is a slogan used by the Falcons and PFT has learned, via a league source, that Levitre’s post was in fact a reference to a trade that will send him to Atlanta. The compensation going back to Tennessee is unknown at this time.

Levitre came to Tennessee on a six-year, $46.8 million contract before the 2013 season and played all 32 games for the Titans over the last two seasons, but his performance wasn’t up to the expectations that accompanied Levitre from his successful stint with the Bills. Byron Bell replaced him at left guard this summer, which would have made him an expensive backup for the Titans.

He’ll move into a zone blocking system with Kyle Shanahan running the Falcons offense and should be able to mount at least a challenge for a starting job given the underwhelming current crop of interior linemen in Atlanta.

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Jay Ajayi suffered a cracked rib Thursday night

Jay Ajayi AP

Running back Jay Ajayi dropped a bit lower than expected in the draft because of concerns about his knee and now a rib injury may limit his chances of making an impact in his rookie season with the Dolphins.

Adam Beasley of the Miami Herald reports that Ajayi, who wound up going in the fifth round, cracked a rib during Thursday night’s preseason finale. The injury came during a good game for Ajayi, who ran nine times for 66 yards and caught two passes for 37 yards against the Buccaneers. It was a step in the right direction for Ajayi, who missed the first two preseason games while dealing with hamstring issues in August.

“I thought he ran hard,” Dolphins coach Joe Philbin said. “He made a guy or two miss, showed toughness inside, and caught the balls that were thrown to him, which is always a good place to start.”

There’s not much chance that the Dolphins are going to cut Ajayi, but his absences early in camp didn’t help him in the competition for playing time with other backup options to Lamar Miller. If the Dolphins want to go with Damien Williams, LaMichael James and/or Mike Gillislee, they could place Ajayi on injured reserve and let this year serve as a redshirt season.

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Bills to release linebacker/puncher of people IK Enemkpali

Buffalo Bills v Cleveland Browns Getty Images

Tyrod Taylor doesn’t have to worry about getting punched in the face, or at least as much as he did previously.

According to Mike Garafolo of FOX Sports, the Bills have released linebacker IK Enemkpali, who they had in for a few weeks after he broke former Jets teammate Geno Smith’s jaw.

The Bills had some interest since coach Rex Ryan drafted him during his last year with the Bills, but they apparently decided he wasn’t worth keeping around.

While Enemkpali has some pass-rush potential, he also has problems keeping his hands to himself off the field.

In addition to his former teammate who owed him $600, Enemkpali has also punched an off-duty cop and a man who was posing as a woman named “Missy Lee” whom he met on the internet and arranged to have sex with.

And now, he has punched his ticket out of Buffalo.

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Report: Eagles trying to trade Najee Goode

Jimmy Garoppolo, Najee Goode AP

There were points this offseason when people wondered whether the Eagles were interested in trading linebacker Mychal Kendricks, but those thoughts went out the window when the Eagles signed Kendricks to a contract extension.

That guaranteed a crowded group at inside linebacker since the Eagles also have DeMeco Ryans, Kiko Alonso and 2015 third-round pick Jordan Hicks on track to make the roster with former Packer Brad Jones and Najee Goode also in the mix. The Eagles are reportedly trying to thin that herd through a trade.

Jeff McLane of the Philadelphia Inquirer reports that the Eagles are trying to trade Goode before the Saturday afternoon deadline to cut the roster to 53 players. There’s no word on what they might be looking for in return, but anything more than a pick in the final rounds would be a stretch.

Goode was a fifth-round pick in 2012 and has played 18 games in three years with the team. He missed 15 games last season after tearing his pectoral muscle in the season opener.

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Report: Steelers trade punter Wing to Giants

Pittsburgh Steelers v Philadelphia Eagles Getty Images

The news of the Giants releasing punter Steve Weatherford Friday morning came as a surprise. Now, Aaron Wilson of the Houston Chronicle reports the Giants have added his replacement, Brad Wing, in a trade with the Steelers.

That means the Steelers are likely going with Jordan Berry as their punter. Wing punted for the Steelers as a rookie last season.

Berry averaged 49.8 yards per punt in the preseason, about a yard better than Wing. Berry was working an overnight shift at McDonald’s a year ago in his native Australia before getting an office job in hopes of saving enough money to return to the United States and give the NFL one more try, and it appears now he’s landed an NFL gig.

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PFT Live: Jeffrey Kessler, Eagles talk with Tim McManus

Jeffrey L. Kessler AP

The NFLPA and Tom Brady scored a big win in federal court over the NFL on Thursday and we’ll have one of the key people involved on the winning side as a guest on PFT Live Friday.

Attorney Jeffrey Kessler fielded the questions from Judge Richard Berman for the NFLPA during oral arguments leading up to Berman’s decision to overturn Brady’s four-game suspension and he’ll join Mike Florio on Friday’s program to discuss the case. They’ll talk about the ruling, the NFL’s appeal and what impact the whole saga may have on future disciplinary actions coming from the league office.

Tim McManus of 97.5 The Fanatic will be on the program to talk about the Eagles with the cut to 53 players looming. They’ll talk about who will make the roster and whether Tim Tebow will be the No. 3 quarterback in Philly this year.

As always, we also want to hear what PFT Planet thinks. Email questions at any time or get in touch on Twitter at @ProFootballTalk to let us know what’s on your mind.

It all gets started at noon ET and you can listen to all three hours live via the various NBC Sports Radio affiliates, through the links at PFT, or with the NBC Sports Radio app. You can also watch a simulcast of the first hour by clicking right here.

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Snoop Dogg isn’t a fan of the Tom Brady decision

425.snoop.steelers.101308 Getty Images

A well-established bandwagon-hopper who seems to gravitate to the Steelers isn’t happy with the court decision that makes Patriots quarterback Tom Brady available for the Week One game against Pittsburgh.

Rapper Snoop Dogg posted a video online complaining about the reversal of the suspension by Judge Richard Berman.

“Yeah, the NFL overturned Brady’s sh-t,” Snoop Dogg said. “I can’t do nothing but smoke. That’s bullsh-t. You might as well overturn all the homies that got weed cases in the league, too. If you all are gonna do that. Keep it real.”

On one hand, he has a point. The NFL shouldn’t care about players smoking marijuana on their own time — especially in Colorado and Washington, where it’s now legal. On the other hand, the substance-abuse policy is separate from the policies that applied to Brady.

Brady was never told he could be suspended for his actions. Players know they can be suspended for smoking marijuana. And that’s ultimately why Brady will be playing against Snoop’s Steelers in six days.

It’s also why Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell and receiver Martavis Bryant won’t be.

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Bucs going with Kyle Brindza as their kicker

Lovie Smith AP

The third kicker the Bucs tried during the preseason is the one who will be on the roster for the start of the regular season.

Per Ian Rapoport of NFL Network, the Bucs will go with Kyle Brindza as their kicker. The team traded to acquire Brindza from the Lions earlier this week, and he made field goals of 55 and 57 yards in Thursday night’s preseason finale.

Last year’s kicker Patrick Murray will be gone because he missed both field goals and extra points during the preseason. Before the third preseason game the Bucs signed Connor Barth, who’d lost a 2014 camp competition to Murray, and Barth missed his first field goal try in a preseason game last weekend.

Brindza, 22, is a rookie out of Notre Dame. He punted and kicked at Notre Dame and had to go the undrafted route after struggling last season, but at least for now he’s landed a job in the NFL.

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T.J. Ward on why he was suspended: My last name’s not Brady

T.J. Ward, Aqib Talib AP

In a statement released after the announcement of a one-game suspension on Thursday, Broncos safety T.J. Ward said that he takes “full responsibility” for the 2014 incident at a Denver strip club that led to the suspension and that he’s “willing to accept the consequences” of his actions.

That doesn’t mean Ward is thrilled about the league’s decision. Through a plea arrangement that called for him to do community service, the misdemeanor assault and disturbing the peace charges against Ward for allegedly throwing a mug at a bartender were dropped and that doesn’t sit right with the safety.

“I feel it’s really unfair,” Ward said, via the Denver Post. “I’m getting punished for being accused of doing something. Not doing something, but being accused. And I’ve got to pay the consequences.”

When Ward was asked why he thinks he was suspended, he invoked the name of the Patriots quarterback whose suspension was thrown out by Judge Richard Berman earlier on Thursday.

“My last name’s not Brady,” Ward said.

There are myriad differences between the two cases and Ward’s not the first player to be suspended without being convicted of a crime, but dropping Tom Brady’s name into the conversation is an easy way to build on the stiff rebuke of the way NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell wields his power that Berman issued earlier in the day.

It doesn’t look like this case is headed to federal court, so the Broncos will probably just have to play without Ward for the opening week of the season. It probably won’t be the last time we’re reminded of the eroded confidence in Goodell and the NFL’s disciplinary policies as a result of their handling of the Brady suspension, though.

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Eagles to end John Moffitt’s comeback from retirement attempt

John Moffitt AP

The Eagles were willing to give John Moffitt a chance to come back to the NFL, but he didn’t show them enough to warrant extending that chance to the regular season.

According to John Lombardo of NJ.com, the Eagles have released the former Seahawks and short-time Broncos guard.

Moffitt un-retired this summer after a two-year sabbatical from the league. When he was playing, he faced a number of drug and public urination charges, but he reportedly went to rehab to get himself back on track.

Whether he gets back to playing football remains to be seen, but it won’t be in Philadelphia.

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49ers release Darnell Dockett

Darnell Dockett AP

In the offseason, defensive tackle Darnell Dockett chose the 49ers over the Cardinals. Now, the 49ers have chosen someone else over Dockett.

Per a league source, the 49ers have released Dockett, one day ahead of the mandatory trimming of rosters from 75 to 53.

Dockett signed a two-year, $7.25 million deal with the 49ers. He earned a $500,000 workout bonus, and he has $2 million in guaranteed base salary, with offset language.

The move makes Dockett a free agent. He can now sign with any other team. And the 49ers will get a dollar-for-dollar credit, up to $2 million, on whatever he earns elsewhere.

Dockett had been dealing with a rib issue; he called it a cracked rib, and the team called it a cartilage issue. If he doesn’t quickly land with a new team, an injury grievance is possible, since players can’t be cut when they are hurt.

Either way, there’s a chance team will wait until after Week One to sign Dockett. As a vested veteran, his full base salary becomes guaranteed if he’s on the roster for the opening weekend.

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Bucs moving on from Da’Quan Bowers

Da'Quan Bowers, Adrian Clayborn AP

Da’Quan Bowers signed a one-year deal with the Bucs just before training camp in hopes of rejuvenating his career and moving past his disappointing first four seasons.

Instead, it’s the team that’s moving on. Per Mike Garafolo of FOX Sports, the Bucs plan to waive Bowers as part of their roster cuts that will be made Friday and Saturday.

Bowers tweeted a thank you to the Bucs on Friday morning.

A second-round pick in 2011, Bowers had seven sacks in four years for the Bucs. He’s played both defensive end and defensive tackle.

“Da’Quan did some good things for us last year,” Bucs coach Love Smith said early in camp. “And I know right now, he came in, in-shape and ready to go.

“He can be a good football player.”

He just wasn’t good enough for the Bucs this summer.

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Doug Whaley: I didn’t go rogue on decision to cut Fred Jackson

Fred Jackson, Sealver Siliga AP

After the Bills cut running back Fred Jackson this week, Tim Graham of the Buffalo News reported that General Manager Doug Whaley “went rogue” on the decision to part ways with the longtime member of the team and never entertained the idea of a pay cut that would have made Jackson a more affordable piece for the team to hold onto going into the season.

On Thursday, Whaley answered questions about that report. He said the decision to release Jackson “wasn’t an easy one” and that it wasn’t one that he made by breaking off from the rest of the organization.

“Let’s put it this way,” Whaley said, via the Buffalo News. “I gather information from everybody, from the running backs coach to the offensive coordinator to the head coach and the owners. I wouldn’t be in this position — especially with new ownership — I’m going to include them. That’s my boss. We wouldn’t make a decision without them.”

Whaley said coach Rex Ryan was with him when they informed Jackson of his release, but declined to delve into the reasons behind the decision other than saying it was one the team felt it “had to make.”

Jackson, who accused Whaley of being dishonest with him about his status on the team, visited with the Seahawks this week, but hasn’t signed a contract in Seattle or anywhere else.

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NFL kickers made 93 percent of extra points in the preseason

Kansas City Chiefs v Arizona Cardinals Getty Images

The new extra point rule had a small but noticeable impact on the preseason.

With the 2015 preseason now in the books, kickers went a cumulative 196-for-210 on the new longer extra points, meaning they made 93.3 percent of their kicks. That’s down significantly from recent numbers in the regular season: During the 2014 regular season, kickers made 99.3 percent of extra points, and NFL kickers have made at least 98 percent of extra points every season since 1994.

But kickers will probably do better in the regular season because the worst kickers in the preseason are going to get cut. Eagles kicker Kip Smith, for instance, missed a league-high three extra points, but he won’t be the Eagles’ kicker during the regular season.

The new rule changes extra points from the equivalent of a 20-yard field goal to a 33-yard field goal. For an NFL kicker, a 33-yard field goal is still an easy kick. So when the regular season starts, the vast majority of extra points will be successful. But the conversion rate just might fall below 98 percent for the first time in two decades.

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ESPN analyst, De Smith grapple over arbitration provision

DeMaurice Smith AP

We’ve heard of good cop/bad cop. When it comes to the ESPN tag-team of legal analysts, the better term may be bad cop/worse cop.

Two weeks ago, we outlined the many flaws in Lester Munson’s insistence that Tom Brady would not win the case that, a day ago, he won. In the aftermath of that decision, Roger Cossack interviewed NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith — and Cossack went after Smith on the decision to give Commissioner Roger Goodell final say over cases like Brady’s.

The exchange between Cossack and Smith was transcribed by SportsBusiness Daily.

“You guys agreed to a process that I didn’t even call an arbitration, because an arbitration as I’ve always understood it is a neutral, impartial person,” Coassack said. “Agreeing to let Roger Goodell, the enemy, be the arbitrator as well as the person who reviews and is the appellate reviewer of his own decision was a way I thought of saying, ‘We know we’re not going to get a fair hearing, and we’ll live with it.’”

“The thing you said earlier is idiotic, because you and I both know as lawyers that there are arbitration proceedings that take place all the time,” Smith said. “We aren’t in a world where any party agrees that an arbitrator can be unfair.”

“De, what did you think Roger Goodell was going to be good for you guys?” Cossack replied. “Did you think he was going to be fair, or did you think he was going to represent the National Football League?”

“If an arbitrator can be unfair, then Paul Tagliabue could not have reversed Roger Goodell,” Smith said, in reference to the Saints bounty suspensions.

“So you’re saying to me that you agreed to let Roger Goodell be the arbiter and the reviewer of his own decision, but implicit in that decision was that he was going to act fairly?” Cossack replied. “Come on.”

“If you are confused, I would urge you to open the cases about industrial due process,” Smith said.

“And I have, Judge Berman agrees with you, I’ll give you that,” Cossack said.

“Well you don’t have to give me anything, Roger. Read the law,” Smith said. “We didn’t let Roger Goodell do this.”

Smith is clearly right, and Cossack is clearly wrong. What’s amazing is that Cossack seems to know he’s clearly wrong, but he nevertheless pushed this goofy point that, when the union agreed to allow the Commissioner to have final say over matters regarding conduct detrimental to the integrity of the game, the union agreed to give the Commissioner a license to do whatever he wants to do in cases like this, regardless of fairness, due process, or any other applicable legal requirements.

Giving the Commissioner the power to be, essentially, a judge doesn’t mean giving him the power to do whatever he wants to do. With the power comes the obligation to do it properly, and if it’s not done properly, it’s subject to a separate challenge.

So, yes, the union gave the Commissioner final say over these matters (in 1968), but the union retained the ability to appeal those decisions if those decisions were not made properly. Even with the very high bar that the court system has put in place when reviewing arbitration awards, the NFL went so far that a federal judge threw out the decision.

It’s not an NFLPA problem. It’s an NFL problem. The NFL thinks it can do whatever it wants to do, and nothing has managed to penetrate an echo chamber in which either those around the Commissioner are telling him what he wants to hear — or they’re telling him what he needs to hear, and he’s ignoring it.

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