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Eric Kettani got hate mail over his NFL-Navy arrangement

Eric Kettani AP

Redskins fullback Eric Kettani is just the type of player the NFL would love to see representing the league on this Fourth of July: In addition to playing for the Redskins, he’s a graduate of the Naval Academy and was recently promoted to lieutenant in the Navy. But not everyone is a fan of Kettani.

In fact, Kettani said in an interview on NFL Network that people have lashed out at him for making an arrangement with the Navy to go to the NFL before completing the five years of active duty required of most Naval Academy graduates. Kettani agreed to do public affairs and recruiting work for the next seven years in exchange for the Navy allowing him to leave active duty to play in the NFL.

“I received some hate mail, saying, ‘Go back to the military, do your job, and do what you signed up for.’ They have every right to say that,” Kettani said.

Kettani spent two years in active service after graduating from the Naval Academy in 2009 and then was told that he’d be allowed to go to the NFL. At the start of the 2011 season he was on the Patriots’ practice squad, but the Navy reversed course and told him to report to active duty. In 2012 the Navy reversed course again and allowed him to go back to the NFL.

Not everyone agrees with that decision, but Kettani is proud to be doing what the military requires of him while chasing his NFL dream.

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73 Responses to “Eric Kettani got hate mail over his NFL-Navy arrangement”
  1. bestbitter says: Jul 4, 2013 8:09 AM

    The worst people in the world are the chest thumping ‘patriots’ who never served in the military.

    Happy 4th

  2. byzr says: Jul 4, 2013 8:14 AM

    i’d imagine none of those writing the letters are willing to enlist. i don’t see anything wrong with his arrangement sounds like he’s doing what the Navy asks of him.

  3. smithopher says: Jul 4, 2013 8:15 AM

    I don’t see the big deal. He’s not trying to get out of it completely, he’s just pursuing another one of his dreams while he’s got the opportunity, and the navy is kind enough to let him. Nothing wrong with that. The kid is lucky, he’s got opportunities out there. Can’t blame him for taking the shot he’s been given at his opportunities. It’s kind of what he joined the military for, in the first place, no? To protect America, the land of opportunity? Why shouldn’t he be able to capitalize on his while he has a shot, then go back to the military?

  4. crapdrawers says: Jul 4, 2013 8:15 AM

    the haters are ignorant fools. The NFL is a young man’s game, if the Navy allows him he should play while he can, and the Navy SHOULD allow him to. He can serve out his term later, he has a chance to do something special let him do it. GL Eric.

  5. tfbuckfutter says: Jul 4, 2013 8:15 AM

    I don’t have a strong and fast opinion on the guy or the situation, but I can understand why people would be bothered by this special treatment. Especially when we’re talking about a marginal player.

    If he were a doctor would he get the same treatment, or would he be serving as a medic? Does anyone dispute that doctors aren’t more important to our society than athletes?

    What if he was an awesome guitar player? Special exception for him to go on tour with his band?

  6. anygivenwednesday13 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:17 AM

    As a vet I’ve no problem with him being allowed to do what few are able to do.

    It was actually told to me during basic that if at some point during your military career you were to secure a secondary income (say as a musician) that would make you financially well-off … the military would grant you a seperation. Why? Because at that point if you are bringing in hundreds of thousands of dollars singing or playing guitar … is your heart really going to be into jumping out of planes for 30-60K/year (my numbers might be off for enlisted personnel in 2013)?

  7. anygivenwednesday13 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:18 AM

    bestbitter says:
    Jul 4, 2013 8:09 AM
    “The worst people in the world are the chest thumping ‘patriots’ who never served in the military.

    Happy 4th”

    Amen.

  8. pj1983a says: Jul 4, 2013 8:18 AM

    The military really needs to get its ducks in a row on this one. Either make a fair and consistent policy that gives players the opportunity to advance into the NFL while serving their country, or disband your college-level football teams altogether and stop pretending like you’re a part of the NFL’s de facto farm system.

  9. lostsok says: Jul 4, 2013 8:20 AM

    Probably writing hate mail in their Aaron Hernandez jersey from eBay.

    I thank this kid for his service. Now, after the NFL…who cares? I applaud the Navy for working with him to allow him a career AND to serve his country. What the heck is wrong with people???

  10. h0c2000 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:22 AM

    Bill Polian foresaw this backlash and took him off the Colt’s draft board

  11. gallaghedj311 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:22 AM

    Too many hateful people in the world. Good for u kid.

  12. anygivenwednesday13 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:29 AM

    “if he were a doctor would he get the same treatment, or would he be serving as a medic? Does anyone dispute that doctors aren’t more important to our society than athletes?

    What if he was an awesome guitar player? Special exception for him to go on tour with his band?”

    #1) You know we do have doctors in the military right? Every flavor we’ve got in the private sector exists in the military … and they are paid handsomely.

    #2) Yes in some rare instances … say if you were the next big thing & signed a huge record deal … you probably would be released from your military obligation.

  13. 4ever19 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:33 AM

    h0c2000 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:22 AM

    Bill Polian foresaw this backlash and took him off the Colt’s draft board

    ROTFL

  14. tincansailor981 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:34 AM

    It’s not like he’s setting a precedent or anything. Do the names David Robinson and Napoleon Mcallum ring a bell?

  15. boyshole25 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:34 AM

    Mike brown didn’t draft this kid due to the navy wanting him “back” problems

  16. dartwick says: Jul 4, 2013 8:38 AM

    pj1983a says: Jul 4, 2013 8:18 AM

    “The military really needs to get its ducks in a row on this one. Either make a fair and consistent policy that gives players the opportunity to advance into the NFL while serving their country, or disband your college-level football teams altogether and stop pretending like you’re a part of the NFL’s de facto farm system.”

    No the navy has been playing college football longer than the NFL has existed.

    The NFL is too cheap to run its own minor league – dont blame the Navy for that.

  17. whysomanylosers says: Jul 4, 2013 8:40 AM

    If it is OK for the “Admiral” David Robinson why not this kid? If anything he brings more attention to serving and honoring his commitment.
    Good luck with your NFL career and thanks for serving.

  18. psj3809 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:46 AM

    They should be consistent, if this some sort of new ‘rule’ or way to get round the years he has to serve ?

    Past Navy/Army players do their years and then enter the NFL (Eg Raiders HB Napoleon McCallum years back)

  19. war71 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:46 AM

    I would guess it’s nobodies business but the US Navy & Eric Kettani.

  20. thefirstsmilergrogan says: Jul 4, 2013 8:58 AM

    bestbitter says:Jul 4, 2013 8:09 AM

    The worst people in the world are the chest thumping ‘patriots’ who never served in the military.

    Happy 4th

    Exactly right, with one corollary. The absolute worst of these are the “warriors” who never served but now dress in camo and shoot paintballs at each other on the weekends.

  21. blackbug99 says: Jul 4, 2013 9:02 AM

    There is precedence for this. David Robinson did the same in the NBA. No malice towards the young man. I hope he does well and represents the Navy proudly. However the real heroes leave luxury to serve. Mr. Pat Tillman…you are remembered today!!

  22. 3kdad says: Jul 4, 2013 9:03 AM

    Do the math: He’s done 2 of his 5 yrs owed. Now he’s agreed to be a poster boy for the next 7. He’s putting in 9 years to work off the 5 owed. What’s the problem?

  23. corvusrex96 says: Jul 4, 2013 9:08 AM

    I have no issue with him playing in the NFL but I think the Navy screwed this one up . If the rule for everyone one else is you get a free education and serve , why go down the road of making exceptions ?

  24. abninf says: Jul 4, 2013 9:14 AM

    “I received some hate mail, saying, ‘Go back to the military, do your job, and do what you signed up for.’ They have every right to say that,”
    ====================================

    I think it’s a little dramatic to call that “hate mail”. As a retired 24 year grunt I don’t agree that’s it’s okay for this young man to get out of his commitment. Taxpayers paid for his education, training, room, board, uniforms, food, everything. I don’t think they expect to get some guy who will go around for a few years on public relations stuff to check the block so he can play a civilian sport when we have men humping 150 pound rucksacks up mountains waiting to get shot at.

  25. pnw51 says: Jul 4, 2013 9:17 AM

    The guy did his active duty for 2 years, which is exactly what David Robinson did before he entered the NBA. Roger Staubach also did one year of active duty and then went to the NFL. I’m sure there have been other exceptions. Kettani served twice as much time on active duty as Staubach and the same as Robinson.

  26. 1historian says: Jul 4, 2013 9:18 AM

    My favorite t-shirt is 13 years old and I only wear it on VERY special occasions. It says:

    “Only in America does a homeless vet sleep in a cardboard box while a draft-dodger sleeps in the White House.”

  27. greenmeattruck says: Jul 4, 2013 9:24 AM

    So, you’re saying that the Navy pulled a Favre?

  28. cjmcbragg says: Jul 4, 2013 9:45 AM

    This is the Navy’s fault. I’m an old man so I remember when the Military, mostly Army/Navy academies would use any athlete who could be a pro as a recruiting tool for the service and the academies. Those few soldier/athlete’s were far more valuable to the military for PR and marketing than they were for manning the 1 9’s on a destroyer. But that was the old pre-internet, pre-global war on terror world. Now I don’t think that kind of stuff matters as much or at least the personnel in the Navy clearly don’t agree how much it matters or doesn’t matter giving the obvious indecision with this case. Isn’t social evolution great kids?

  29. thraiderskin says: Jul 4, 2013 9:46 AM

    I find this story odd, only because everyone acts like the military doesn’t make special exceptions for people… To those who are butthurt, in any manner over this, it never hurts to ask, Kettani did and an exception was made. Don’t act like he still isn’t serving the Navy in a great capacity and don’t act like if you were given the same opportunity, you wouldn’t have taken the chance.

  30. justintuckrule says: Jul 4, 2013 9:57 AM

    Where’s the slippery slope argument from the bush loving backwards think tank? Gay marriage leads to marriage to animals, right? Shouldn’t granting requests to football players lead to requests coming from other talented artisans? Singers? Painters? Film makers? Chefs? Heck….there’s a kid I know who makes a great sub sandwich. Where’s his exceptions? Hypocrites.

  31. TheWizard says: Jul 4, 2013 9:57 AM

    If he’s doing what the Navy allows him to do, I don’t care what anybody else thinks of it.

    He shouldn’t either.

  32. krank00 says: Jul 4, 2013 10:00 AM

    I am not sure what is stated is described in the article is hate mail. I think it serves the Navy, as well as all other forms of the military, very well as a recruiting tool. His capacity as an officer would not have the impact that his marketing ability as an NFL level athlete would have. All that said…. voicing a difference of opinion does not constitute hate mail.

  33. nashvilleseahawk says: Jul 4, 2013 10:01 AM

    Blackbug99, no precedence? Ever heard of a guy named Roger Staubach? This guy needs to do his commitment and then come back and play.

  34. cmoney20 says: Jul 4, 2013 10:05 AM

    Pretty much what I expected from the responses. It’s 2013 so no one is expected to follow through with their commitments. Then when someone calls you out on it, they’re the scumbag. Accountability, pride in finishing what you started just doesn’t exist anymore. I hope China doesn’t read this article.

  35. whatjusthapped says: Jul 4, 2013 10:05 AM

    But the military has specifically made provisions for cases such as this and Kettani is following the rule book and was granted permission to try out for the Redskins.

    Most likely it is some hate-America no matter what nitwits writing the hate mail, in other words, your typical democrat.

  36. hatesycophants says: Jul 4, 2013 10:08 AM

    It’s interesting that those who never served (voluntarily or otherwise) are the ones who have the strongest, least educated opinions against this arrangement. Mind your own business and find a way to contribute something to this still great country!

  37. justanotherdummy says: Jul 4, 2013 10:09 AM

    The people writing to Kettani are off base. They may not realize how much money the services spend on recruiting and advertising. This young man is in a perfect spot to help recruit athletes to the service academies. Most upper level nco’s in the Marines spend time billeted as a recruiter, this man is doing much the same thing. Look at the bump in talk about the USNA when David Robinson was there, I got to meet him during my plebe year. However, he grew so much during his 4 years at Annaplois that he technically should have been separated after his youngster year. The the publicity made allowing him to stay well worth it in he long term, even though he never served as a line officer.

  38. thejimius says: Jul 4, 2013 10:15 AM

    For those talking about consistency, this is nothing new for the military. Pretty much any requirement can be waivered by the correct authority. People get out of the military honorably for many reasons without fulfilling their full obligation.

    This isn’t unique, it’s just high profile because he’s a football player.

  39. easyeddie says: Jul 4, 2013 10:23 AM

    What’s hateful about ‘Go back to the military, do your job, and do what you signed up for.’ ?

  40. anchorbarred says: Jul 4, 2013 10:24 AM

    People need to worry a little more about their own worlds than delving into this kid’s. This works out for him and the Navy.

    Happy 4th everyone, have fun and be safe!

  41. ezcheese69 says: Jul 4, 2013 10:26 AM

    I am a Vet and I don’t think that anyone that has not served should say anything about this. If u have not given up part of your life to ensure the safety of our freedom then keep your mouth closed. Or go join up and then you can earn the right to comment about this. The military ir a brotherhood no matter what branch u were/are in. Until u have earned the right to talk about it, JUST SHUT UP!

  42. aoc57 says: Jul 4, 2013 10:26 AM

    As a Vet- there is nothing wrong with this. People in the military get special exceptions all of the time. He is a walking billboard for Navy Recruitment.

    As for the comment made by the 24 year grunt, thank you for you service. However I don’t see a great majority of the Navy humping around with 150lb rucksacks. Yes I know about the Seals, but the keyword here is majority.

    Eric Kettani is serving his country as best fits the needs of the service. When the Navy says they need him to do something else- they pull him away from the NFL. Now they want him I’m recruitment.

    Congrats sir.

  43. billh1947 says: Jul 4, 2013 10:31 AM

    As a Vietnam Naval veteran I believe that if a young man wants to go to the service schools and get a fine taxpayer paid education the least he can do is fullfill his Naval obligation for the five years he signed on for.many of these military school graduates have the talent to want out and go into fields they would be highly successful at and get rich doing it but they must fullfill their obligations to the Country first,should be no different for a Naval officer who is an athlete of pro calibre.duty comes before riches.

  44. titaniksigh says: Jul 4, 2013 10:47 AM

    It’s just smart marketing. If he’s successful in the NFL, he brings more attention to the Navy. Kids might want to sign up if a guy they look up to has done it. AND the Navy actually gets an extra 2 years out of him. Seems like a no brainer.

  45. stellarperformance says: Jul 4, 2013 10:55 AM

    I commend this guy and the Navy for a win-win decision. It’s a no-brainer.

  46. godofwine330 says: Jul 4, 2013 10:59 AM

    As a Iraqi Freedom Navy veteran I don’t mind it at all that he was allowed to follow his dream and play in the NFL. The Navy allowed it, and though the military has reversed course multiple times on this issue (Caleb Campbell was told that he would be allowed to leave if he got drafted thinking he wouldn’t be drafted…then he got drafted and they made him serve) people look past the fact that the Navy allowed him to leave in exchange for doing things like recruiting to help the Navy.

    People are going to say country first, but I have known plenty of people who got out of the military due to extenuating circumstances (sick parent, death in family, sickness or death of spouse, extreme seasickness on a seagoing job) the list goes on.

    He didn’t violate a rule to get out, the Navy allowed it like they do on occasion when extenuating circumstances present themselves. As a citizen of this country I am proud of him, and as a Navy veteran and brother I am even more proud of him and glad the Navy gave him this rare chance to live the dream. He is still under contract, and he is still serving his country.

  47. jjbadd385 says: Jul 4, 2013 11:02 AM

    One of the most obvious problems in the world today, is evryone has to have a freaking opinion! People have to realize, as I have, in the last 10 years, the US is losing the respect of more and more countries around the globe…. For one reason, our leaders don’t seem to have as much integrity as they used to, and our citizens want to be too damn Politically correct instead of minding their own buisness. Good for this young man….. best of both worlds, and I hope he dont let opinions of others bother him.

  48. charger383 says: Jul 4, 2013 11:04 AM

    If it is OK with the Navy it is a good thing. Services are starting to downsize now.

  49. southcarolinamike says: Jul 4, 2013 11:09 AM

    I would like to think Dick Cheney, Bill Kristol and the other new-conservatives on FOX News would have something better to do with their time than sending letters to this young man. After all, they served their time…..What? ….They avoided what with deferments?…..

  50. bsizemore68 says: Jul 4, 2013 11:10 AM

    The man had a chance to play pro football and the Navy said ok, that is between him and the Navy, we don’t have a say here. I got out of the Navy 2 months before my time was up because I had a letter for an interview for a good job, the Navy said go for it, it was a big deal for me, thank you Navy. My son was in the class of 87, David Roberson was a class mate and they played basketball in the gym and he watch David grow very tall. The point here is the Navy has plans and they will do what they think is best for every one, so get off the guys back. Bill

  51. godofwine330 says: Jul 4, 2013 11:12 AM

    @ abninf

    I think it’s a little dramatic to call that “hate mail”. As a retired 24 year grunt I don’t agree that’s it’s okay for this young man to get out of his commitment. Taxpayers paid for his education, training, room, board, uniforms, food, everything. I don’t think they expect to get some guy who will go around for a few years on public relations stuff to check the block so he can play a civilian sport when we have men humping 150 pound rucksacks up mountains waiting to get shot at.
    ***************************
    Don’t give me that tax payers stuff. I’m a vet, he pays taxes, too, so in turn he is paying part of his own salary. And the job he is doing “public relations,” you do realize that there are full-time military people who do just that, right? “Choose your rate, choose your fate,” we used to say in the Navy. Admin, Enginemen, grunts, supply folks, and men humping ruck sacks all get paid the same money – some work in cool AC, some work in 100+ degree temps, some hump ruck sacks and get shot at. You CHOSE your job, or the military gave you one, just like the Navy gave him one. Plus they got 2 more years out of him than he originally signed up for. Plus, we don’t hump rucksacks in the Navy.

  52. thestrategyexpert says: Jul 4, 2013 11:47 AM

    Don’t the haters know that this is America and people sign up for the Navy and other branches of service to fight for the rights of others, such as the right to change one’s mind and get out of a contract? Contracts and agreements are what they are, and the provisions for exiting them are what they are. If you don’t like Kettani’s choice, then take it up with the Navy and leave the man alone. He can do what he wants.

    But seems like a smart decision by the Navy to me.

  53. blackbug99 says: Jul 4, 2013 12:19 PM

    nashvilleseahawk says:
    Jul 4, 2013 10:01 AM
    Blackbug99, no precedence? Ever heard of a guy named Roger Staubach? This guy needs to do his commitment and then come back and play.
    ————————————————–

    Actually, I said there was a precedence for this occurring. Meaning, it has been done before. I didn’t condone it. Maybe he will give the Navy a shot after the pro’s. For now, if he keeps a steady head and an exemplary lifestyle, he’s exactly what the Navy and NFL needs!

  54. macjacmccoy says: Jul 4, 2013 12:33 PM

    I agree with the hate mail. We the United States Tax Payers help pay for the educations of everyone who goes to college at the Army Navy etc. campuses. We do this with the knowledge that if we help put them through school that they will repay us by actively going into service to protect this country. That is the agreement that is why they got our money. Saying good things about the military while you get to stay home and making hundreds of thousands of dollars playing football wasnt part of the deal.

    It sets a bad example and precedence. The military is about honor dedication and integrity. He made an agreement with the American public and if he doesnt have enough integrity to keep his word on his own then the choice should be taken away from him.

    Its not nearly enough but at the very least he should be made to pay back every tax payer dollar the government has given him. Plus pay another Navy hopefuls way through school. Because that’s the worst part of this whole thing. Someone got denied a chance to go to college before serving his country so Kettani could have that chance. And now hes basically kicking that person while he’s down by not living up to his end of the deal.

    The money wont give him more integrity or change the fact that he scammed the American government and its people but at least it would be something.

  55. maxkingpin says: Jul 4, 2013 12:59 PM

    Retired Military here. Every year many service members with special circumstances are allowed adjustments to their military commitments. Some pursue Olympics, pro sports etc, others are released due to other problems such as family care. In this case, the commitment is deferred, not cancelled, so the outraged seems misplaced.
    To all my military brethren Happy Independence Day.

  56. onbucky96 says: Jul 4, 2013 1:19 PM

    So, he gets to be a weekly recruiting poster for the Navy, if he makes the roster. Practice squad, he collects 5grand a week in season, and the networks get their feel good story. Where’s my remote control…?

  57. buffalodiehard says: Jul 4, 2013 3:00 PM

    tfbuckfutter says:
    Jul 4, 2013 8:15 AM

    “If he were a doctor would he get the same treatment, or would he be serving as a medic?”

    I see your point but I would submit to you that the NFL is a young man’s sport and for most players at OTA’s it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The difference between him and say, a talented doctor is that you can be a doctor til the day you die. If he waits a couple more years he’s a 28-year-old rookie. He’ll have no shot then.

  58. aoc57 says: Jul 4, 2013 3:36 PM

    What he makes outside of the Navy playing football was known and approved by the Navy prior to him getting the stamp of approval from someone very high up in the Navy.

    To the poster who harped on taxpayers money, etc etc- our government is wasting your tax dollars in a million different ways that are a much bigger deal than Lt. Kettani playing football. Plus they are his tax dollars as well.

  59. kd75 says: Jul 4, 2013 4:23 PM

    David Robinson got the same deal at the Naval Academy to play for the Spurs.

    And he became a hall of fame player and a great ambassador to both his country and his sport. He won an Olympic Gold medal and still helps recruit for the Navy and visits injured vets all over the world.

    This guy should be celebrated. Not chastised. He is my favorite Redskins player and I can’t stand the Redskins. But he’s cool in my book.

  60. babyriggo44 says: Jul 4, 2013 4:41 PM

    ASK NOT WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR YOUR COUNTRY

  61. 086wpd says: Jul 4, 2013 4:54 PM

    chad hall , sf 49’ers did it w/ usaf academy : 2yrs active .. then NFL.

    as a vet i don’t care .

    as a taxpayer , i do… very expensive training.

  62. billh1947 says: Jul 4, 2013 5:09 PM

    The military services are not close to being what they were when I served,no one got out because they could play a sport,even Elvis served his full tour of duty and he really was special.

  63. donmega72 says: Jul 4, 2013 5:12 PM

    The guy did his active duty for 2 years, which is exactly what David Robinson did before he entered the NBA. Roger Staubach also did one year of active duty and then went to the NFL. I’m sure there have been other exceptions. Kettani served twice as much time on active duty as Staubach and the same as Robinson.

    Staubach did four years active duty with a tour in Vietnam. That’s way more than this guy. Most of you supporting Kettani have never served. He made a commitment to the US Navy and he should keep it. He has five years of active duty coming to him and he needs to finish it.

  64. halagich82 says: Jul 4, 2013 7:02 PM

    I am an Army Vet. Everyone needs to back off this guy. For all the people who post things saying he made a committment to his country well I say this. What about all the military personal who are stop lossed with just a few months left in their contracts? Is it fair when the military extends a service members contract with just weeks remaining on it which forces that service member to go back to war? A lot of people are looking at this from only one angle. I also got out of the military before my contract was up and yes it was an honorable discharge and yes I have served in Iraq. To all the people hating on this guy, unless you have been in the military do everyone a favor and shut up!

  65. the3taveren says: Jul 4, 2013 7:05 PM

    I can’t believe it took that long for someone to bring up Staubach. Kettani has actually completed three years on active duty, not two.

  66. corvusrex96 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:01 PM

    Not the end of the world but it sets a bad precedent

    But it is funny how if you don’t agree with the Navy’s decision the posters on here ASSUME you did not serve

    4 years active duty 10 years reserve .

    So @halagich82 I won’t shut up

  67. halagich82 says: Jul 4, 2013 9:10 PM

    So your 10 years reserve equals like 2 active

  68. uscoach says: Jul 4, 2013 10:00 PM

    That’s not hate mail — it’s just mail

  69. nflofficeadmin says: Jul 5, 2013 12:03 AM

    There’s lot of leaches, this is just distracting Americans from the big leaches that run in elections. Happy 4th.

  70. musicman495 says: Jul 5, 2013 10:04 AM

    tincansailor981 says: Jul 4, 2013 8:34 AM

    It’s not like he’s setting a precedent or anything. Do the names David Robinson and Napoleon Mcallum ring a bell?
    —————————–
    Thank you. I like the Navy using their head on this, as they did with Robinson and McCallum. The idea of the Navy telling David Robinson he would serve the Navy better as a 7-foot submarine officer than a walking recruitment poster always seemed stupid to me anyway. Well done, Ensign Kettani!

  71. vstar1us says: Jul 5, 2013 2:00 PM

    I am actively serving right now in the Middle East, and I am happy for this guy! I have served for 32 yrs active and reserve status, I think this young guy should be able to do this, just think of the PR he can do for all of us Military Branches I know he is going to give back. Thank you young man and you have my support.

  72. patriotenvy says: Jul 5, 2013 11:20 PM

    ^^Stay safe

    There is a program called Palace Chase where active duty people can get out of their active commitment and go to reserves. I know a guy who did it because his wife hated the base he was at and he thought it would save his marraige. It didn’t… but he has now done 18 yrs in reserves including tours in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    The military knows what they are doing sometimes.

  73. dawglb says: Jul 11, 2013 11:05 AM

    There are the Pat Tillmans of the World (of which, there are very few), and then there are people like this guy (too many).

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