League wanted to suspend Miller longer, settled for six

AP

Now that the six-game suspension of Broncos linebacker Von Miller has become final, details are trickling out.  Or in.  Or whatever.

Per a league source, the NFL wanted to impose a suspension of more than six games on Miller under Section I.C.3.f of the substance-abuse policy, which permits “additional discipline” where a player engages in a “deliberate effort to substitute or adulterate a specimen or to alter a Test result.”

Others have reported that the first sample collected from Miller was spilled and the second sample was determined to be diluted.  The league, we’re told, believes that the spillage occurred as part of an effort to alter the result, possibly through the adulteration or substitution of the sample.

The NFL agreed to suspend Miller only six games via negotiation with the union.  Per the source, the initial breach of confidentiality that resulted in the media learning of Miller’s potential suspension became leverage in the discussions.

Concerns regarding possible flaws in the collection process also may have been a factor in the league’s willingness to reduce the penalty.  Indeed, if Miller was doing something with the sample cup other than urinating into it while the collector was watching, that shouldn’t have happened because under the collection process the sample collector should have been watching Miller the entire time.

And so the two sides have found a middle ground.  Miller hoped to get the number down to four, the league wanted the number to be higher, and both parties agreed to resolve the case in lieu of risking a different outcome before the case went to a hearing.

The simple fact that the league had concerns about prevailing in an appeals process that the league controls shows that the NFL had real concerns about its case.

63 responses to “League wanted to suspend Miller longer, settled for six

  1. Should have been the entire season…oh well, guess he won’t be breaking any sack records this year. 🙂

  2. It’s like putting Gronk on PUP for the stretch run. Miller’s absence won’t affect that team in the slightest. They’re in a bunk division and you can already pencil them into a playoff bye. The 6 game suspension is more of a blessing. Dude will be just as fresh as Gronk for the stretch run. I’m just glad my team plays Denver week 2.

  3. I feel sorry for the quarterbacks that play the Broncos the last 10 games.. Mr Miller will be back with fresh legs and looking to redeem himself.. Start praying now Mr Rivers and Mr Smith..

  4. ozymandias121 says:
    Aug 20, 2013 6:54 PM
    What do A-Rod and Von Miller have in common? PEDs.

    People these days. Sir please do yourself a favor and blaze one up before trying to play a sport like football..or just any sport, also make sure you have somebody around to record it so you can see just how much your performance is ‘enhanced’.

    Substance Abuse Policy doesn’t not automatically mean PEDs.

  5. I keep hearing/reading about the 1st sample which was spilled & wondering if it was said how it spilt? Did the person administering the test spill it or did Miller know he just gave a dirty sample & if he was the one who “accidentally” spilled the sample?

  6. ozymandias121 says:

    What do A-Rod and Von Miller have in common? PEDs.
    ________________

    Wrong. Substance abuse policy is illegal drugs most likely weed. If it had been cocaine or heroin the league would probably have tried to push through the longer suspension.

  7. orivar says:
    Aug 20, 2013 7:08 PM
    ozymandias121 says:
    Aug 20, 2013 6:54 PM
    What do A-Rod and Von Miller have in common? PEDs.

    People these days. Sir please do yourself a favor and blaze one up before trying to play a sport like football..or just any sport, also make sure you have somebody around to record it so you can see just how much your performance is ‘enhanced’.

    Substance Abuse Policy doesn’t not automatically mean PEDs.

    —————————

    Oh you’re right orivar. He should’ve said:

    What do A-Rod and Von Miller have in common?
    They both try to cheat the system.

  8. SECOND OFFENSE people!!!!!!!!!

    Only those Orange colored glass wearing Donkey fans believe it was for weed.
    Quit making excuses
    D.J, Von, your team is full of juicers.

    2012 season gets a *********
    Your real team that cant play without cheating will be the REAL Broncos.
    9-7 and 2nd place in the West

  9. Well, at least the haters that are trolling like crazy on everything Broncos cannot say that Denver is getting preferential treatment. Although those same fools also thought Denver was getting this treatment earlier.. I am still waiting for some examples of this from anybody!

  10. I grew up in the 50’s and 60’s. What bothers me most about what has happened in sports today is that the fans put up with this crap and even condone it. I saw fans at Yankee Stadium holding up signs stating they loved and support Alex Rodriguez. I mean, are they stupid or nuts??
    Lying used to be one of the worst things people could do. But we’ve grown accustomed to being lied to and the result is no one fears being called a liar today. That’s sad.
    It’s bad enough these over paid athletes help rape us at the ticket booth, but then we can’t even trust them to play their sports honestly.
    I am bewildered how anyone can cheer for people like Bonds, A-Rod, Braun, and all the rest who have been caught red handed. It is a sad commentary on the fans in my opinion. And we all know there are many more who haven’t been caught.
    Think about this. Suppose someone in your family was a gifted athlete who had a chance to play professionally, but could not compete well enough because they weren’t doing PED’s — how would you feel?
    And the worst part is, this is only the tip of the iceberg. PED use in the NFL is rampant and no one is seriously trying to stop it.
    Call me old fashioned. But this much I know. Sports was much better in the 50’s and 60’s than it is today. At least the playing fields were a lot more level in terms of the athletes on the field.
    I’ve gone to my last professional sports event. I refuse to fork over my hard earned money to these lying, arrogant so-called stars. They can all go to hell as far as I’m concerned. And until all fans do the same thing, nothing will change. So — go ahead and keep buying your tickets. I hate to tell you, though, who the real saps are.

  11. “The simple fact that the league had concerns about prevailing in an appeals process that the league controls shows that the NFL had real concerns about its case.”

    Evidently, Von Miller doesn’t share those “real concerns” about the case since he appears to have accepted the six-game suspension, which is significant discipline. Of course, one can also argue that “(t)he simple fact that the league had concerns about prevailing in an appeals process that the league controls” shows that the appeals process is, contrary to the views of some, unbiased.

  12. Soooooooo…what your saying is…..I can cheat…..and I got a chance, right? I just need a good lawyer and I can beat the system right?

    SWEET!!! Thanks NFL!!!

    Signed,

    My College Aged Football Playing Son

  13. On a side note, has any team been in this much disarray and so consistently on the wrong side of the morality tracks ever gone on to win a Super Bowl? Can you be this drunk, stoned, and stupid, and land on top?

  14. “The simple fact that the league had concerns about prevailing in an appeals process that the league controls shows that the NFL had real concerns about its case.”

    Yeah, this makes little sense. Settling for a six-game suspension when the player wanted four is a perfectly fine result as far as the League’s lawyers are probably concerned. An appeals hearing would have meant (1) unveiling details about the drug testing policy, which the NFL wants to avoid, and (2) further embarrassing a popular player for a popular franchise in the midst of the MLB’s A-Rod scandal. The NFL benefits from simply settling for six games (which more than proves a point) and avoiding the further publicity and attorney work hours. Your assumption that the NFL had “real concerns” is faulty; after all, as a lawyer, you should know that absolutely no case is flawless. It’s all about mitigation of risk, and here, the League mitigated that risk with minimal adverse impact on what it wanted to achieve.

  15. Hate to say it, but Von Miller might be Shawne Merriman 2.0. Sets the league on fire his first couple of years, gets caught and is never the same again.

  16. Can we please stop talking about collecting and transporting and spilling human pee? The entire process is a disgusting reminder that evolution among our race has… ebbed.

  17. @nyneal,

    So, you would wish to impose your sense of morality on the rest of us? And, if we are unwilling to accept the imposition, we’re saps? Do you see anything wrong with such a position?

  18. Comparing Von Miller to the Seahawks is silly. VM got busted for using illicit drugs. The 6 Seahawks got busted for cheating.

    There is a bit of a difference. One dude on tbe Broncos violated an appearance policy. In Seadderall an entire team cheated in order to win. Von Miller didn’t cheat like a Seahawk – he just got busted for being stoned. Still dumb, but not cheating.

  19. I hope it is not 6 games for Marijuana. I mean he could have gotten 4 games with PED’s. Well that seems to be the going rate. If it is indeed PED’s, the fax machine that broke on Dumerviel needs to be reexamine by an expert.

  20. So the league backed down because “The collector should have been watching the whole time”? So he is saying it’s the NFLs fault for giving him the opportunity. That’s like saying well I shouldn’t get in trouble for killing someone because there was no one watching me.. Whatever happened to being responsible for your own actions.

  21. “Per a league source, the NFL wanted to impose a suspension of more than six games on Miller”

    Of course they did, after all the Denver is the biggest threat to New England in the AFC.

  22. It’s clear Miller had something to hide. The NFL should’ve taken a hard line stance and nailed him to the wall if nothing else but to set an example to the rest of the league. Saints fans may not like it but the hard stance the league took against bounties set such a strong example that only the truly moronic would dare to shout for anymore bounties anytime soon.

  23. What was once a set fine or suspension that was (unfortunately in my opinion) appealable has now went the way of “negotiable”. I don’t care who the player is and for what team, the NFL needs to maintain a stricter policy of punishment. The companies that produce these synthetic PED’s etc. are way ahead of the testing abilities already, so the NFL needs to dig it’s heels in and not negotiate.

  24. @nyneal
    Amen! I was a die hard Cowboys fan till jerky jones started raping the locals and looking the other way on character issues. Jimmy Johnson probably laughs all the way to the bank. The worst part is that our kids today look up to these clowns, and we put them on a pedestal, when we all know they all cheat in every way possible. It’s not a sport anymore, it’s juiced entertainment.

  25. SELFISH and IRRESPONSIBLE! He would rather risk the teams success and smoke doobies….than to stay clean and play. He can’t even handle paying his traffic tickets…pathetic. Now, he has idle time….I wonder if he can stay clean for that long.

  26. Von Miller is not a PED user as someone compared him to A-Rod. He smokes pot, does MDMA, and amphetamines. These are the drugs he has tested positive for through college and the NFL. Although he swears he doesn’t smoke pot, he certainly is doing something with it and if it has anything to do with enemas, I don’t want to know, but it is getting in his blood stream and urine somehow. This is not a condoning of anything but certain states have legalized pot, it’s certainly not performance enhancing, so testing players for smoking marijuana is just a waste of time and money.

  27. @lanman11 I consider Ray’s antler spray and miracle healing of him and suggs just as shady from last year, if not worse. But they got away with sweeping that stuff under the rug…

  28. Actually, other than this suspension I really see the injuries the only thing that will affect this team. The front office drunks are not going to affect this team play, and Von will be there for the second half of the season, when he is needed. By then the o-line will work itself out and the defense will still be great, this is the first time the D has had the same coord for 2 years in a row since shanahan…

  29. Logic tells me that when a player went to that much trouble to try to manipulate the system and then insist it was just weed, most likely it’s something more damaging.

  30. nyneal:

    I hear you loud and clear.

    The whole thing is a major turnoff and the NFL is flirting with disaster, IMO.

  31. I see it this way. I’m not trying to “impose my sense of morality” on anyone. It’s a question of what’s right and what’s wrong. And what I have seen happen in sports over the last few decades is wrong.
    All I’m saying is that we — the fans — are the ones who have some control over what these athletes (and owners, btw) do and how they behave.
    If we stop paying licensing fees, stop attending the games, and stop buying the merchandise, then — and only then — will these athletes and owners get the message that we are tired of all the crap that’s going on in professional and even college sports.
    After all, the fans ultimately pay the bill. It’s why many long time season ticket holders can no longer afford to hold on to their tickets.
    If we keep on going and they keep raking in their millions, I see no end to this stuff.
    Baseballs’ once hallowed records have been destroyed. In my lifetime, they were always something you could hang your hat on and when someone approached breaking one, it really was special. Now, they’re a total joke. And worse — when some ball player suddenly has a break out year, the first thing I think about is whether he’s juicing or not. That’s ruined the fun of what I used to think was a beautiful game.
    So — my “sense of morality” came from growing up in a time where honesty was a great virtue. But now, it seems to me that is no longer true. It’s a sad commentary on all of us, in my view.

  32. @nyneal

    Football in the 50s and 60s wasn’t nearly as good as it is now.
    Who wants to watch Jim Brown run over guys half his size all day? Well I would because I would find it funny, but the point is the competition is closer than it ever was.

    We have league where literally any team with a decent quarterback has a chance to win the Super Bowl. And if your team sucks, you get slotted into a draft position to get a good quarterback so you might be good next year. You did not have that in the 50s and 60s.

    I guess it must have been fun for you then because the packers, browns, and giants were always winning but some of us like to watch games where almost every team has a shot in winning because of the leagues rules with salary cap and draft order.

  33. …details are trickling out.

    I think you know more than you’re letting on, Florio. I wish you’d just spill it already.

  34. Even as a Pats fan, I actually like Von, love to watch him play. But when people are caught cheating, after taking such a high innocence stance, it is rather bothersome. It’s even worse when your “apology” statement starts out:

    “Although my suspension doesn’t result from a positive test;”

    Give it a rest Von…take your punishment and move on. Stop fooling yourself. It’s like people who preface a sentence by saying “Now I dont want you take offense…. but” Followed by an offensive statement.

    “I didn’t get fired….I quit!”

  35. “I dont do no weed” Denver fans saying first 6 games are bottom dwellars. Same bunch of fans hollering Tebow was tjeir savior a few years back.

  36. Aug 21, 2013 6:10 AM
    I see it this way. I’m not trying to “impose my sense of morality” on anyone. It’s a question of what’s right and what’s wrong. And what I have seen happen in sports over the last few decades is wrong.
    All I’m saying is that we — the fans — are the ones who have some control over what these athletes (and owners, btw) do and how they behave.
    If we stop paying licensing fees, stop attending the games, and stop buying the merchandise, then — and only then — will these athletes and owners get the message that we are tired of all the crap that’s going on in professional and even college sports.
    After all, the fans ultimately pay the bill. It’s why many long time season ticket holders can no longer afford to hold on to their tickets.
    If we keep on going and they keep raking in their millions, I see no end to this stuff.
    Baseballs’ once hallowed records have been destroyed. In my lifetime, they were always something you could hang your hat on and when someone approached breaking one, it really was special. Now, they’re a total joke. And worse — when some ball player suddenly has a break out year, the first thing I think about is whether he’s juicing or not. That’s ruined the fun of what I used to think was a beautiful game.
    So — my “sense of morality” came from growing up in a time where honesty was a great virtue. But now, it seems to me that is no longer true. It’s a sad commentary on all of us, in my view.

    Honesty was a virtue you guys back then where just as bad. The famed Ty Cobb was a known murderer that got away with it because he played sports was praised but hated by all his colleagues. Was known as a cheap and dirty player you had the black sox who sold out the integrity of the game for money. The game hasnt changed today any as it has back in the good old days as you say you had murderers cheaters and everything else you just didnt get the social media and information that we get to day to find out about every scandal because the media helped cover it up so they could sell papers and keep getting exclusives in the good old boy club. The records you say you hold dealer almost everyone one on those records have a shady history Pete Rose broke one the most sacred rules in baseball of his time you do not gamble on baseball. So i say again honesty was a virtue i think not just hidden/covered up better

  37. Those who long for the honesty and integrity of the 50s and 60s in America should worry all of us.

    The times you long for were just as dishonest as they are now, perhaps more so. The media is known to have been complicit in covering up “lies” for politicians, professional athletes and anyone with enough money to pay for his own brand of truth.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!