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The 400-yard passing game is no longer special

New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning leaves the field after the Giants lost to the Dallas Cowboys durign their NFL game in Arlington, Texas Reuters

There was a time in the NFL when a quarterback who passed for 400 yards in a game had done something really special. That time has passed.

Consider this: In 2005, there were only two 400-yard passing games all season, both by Marc Bulger of the Rams. In 2013, that total has already been surpassed, and Week One isn’t even over. Peyton Manning, Eli Manning and Colin Kaepernick all topped 400 yards this week.

NFL quarterbacks have picked up this season right where they left off in the last couple of seasons. Over the last 35 weeks of the regular season, stretching back to Week One of 2011, there have been 36 quarterbacks who threw for 400 yards in a game. Basically, in the NFL these days, we average a 400-yard passer a week.

And when you see something every week, it stops being special. In the 1970s, there were five 400-yard passing games for the entire decade. When Joe Namath topped 400 passing yards, he had done something really great. When Eli Manning went for 450 in Sunday night’s loss to the Cowboys, it sure didn’t feel like a great game.

Terry Bradshaw, Roger Staubach and Bart Starr are among the Hall of Fame quarterbacks who never passed for 400 yards in a game. Matthew Stafford is only 25 years old and has already done it five times.

What has changed? That was the question Brian Kenny posed to me on his NBC Sports Radio show this morning. The primary difference is the rules: Quarterbacks are protected from hits. Wide receivers are protected from hits. Pass interference, illegal contact and defensive holding are called much more stringently.

What has also changed is that young quarterbacks come into the league ready to command an NFL offense immediately. In the old days, it took years for quarterbacks to make the transition from the college game to the NFL. Now young quarterbacks can do it immediately. In NFL history, there have only been four 400-yard passing games by rookie quarterbacks, and all four of them happened in the last two years.

Despite playing at a time when 400-yard passing games were less common, Dan Marino is still the all-time leader, with 13 games of at least 400 yards passing in his career. But it’s just a matter of time before Peyton Manning or Drew Brees, both of whom have nine career 400-yard games, surpass Marino.

Manning or Brees might even surpass Marino this year.

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74 Responses to “The 400-yard passing game is no longer special”
  1. myspaceyourface says: Sep 9, 2013 11:23 AM

    You can’t touch the QB or the WR without a flag, what did they expect to happen.

  2. delius1967 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:26 AM

    What this shows more than anything is how incredible a quarterback Marino was. He threw like the QBs of today, but did it 30 years ago.

  3. gochargersgo says: Sep 9, 2013 11:27 AM

    If anything, 400 yards passing is usually just a sign that your own defense didnt show up to play that week.

  4. bkaysgold says: Sep 9, 2013 11:29 AM

    Replace the defense with cones and if the offense knocks a cone down, then thats where he’s downed.

  5. blizzard01 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:29 AM

    Unfortunately it is in Minnesota.

  6. mp4philly says: Sep 9, 2013 11:30 AM

    Coincidentally, Eli Manning is on pace to throw 400 interceptions this season.

  7. budklosterman says: Sep 9, 2013 11:30 AM

    If you look at a wide receiver wrong they throw a flag these days! A player isn’t as worried about raising up in the middle of the field because they know they can’t be touched! I am all for player safety, but these calls are going too far!

  8. bucrightoff says: Sep 9, 2013 11:31 AM

    Football has been sissified to death by Goodell. In a few years a 5,000 yard season won’t even rate. Goodell has to go before he does irreversible harm to the game.

  9. orivar says: Sep 9, 2013 11:31 AM

    Well of course. The QB has become almost untouchable, also those games weren’t necessarily perfect either. As in the teams either abandoned the pass early or are a passing attack like Denver, who weren’t contested much by the Raven’s still forming D.

  10. malibudave66 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:31 AM

    I totally agree that the rules of the game today make it like Basketball for the QBs and Receivers. Defense is always on its heals because of this and that’s why the points are way up too!

  11. scmems07 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:32 AM

    it’s special when your a rookie and your doing it, since nobody expect’s it, luck, newton and tannehill in that order for rookie record….but when it’s you 3rd season and you just got your first 300 yard game let alone a 400 yarder, not so much.

  12. joetoronto says: Sep 9, 2013 11:32 AM

    Man, it seems like yesterday that 300 yards was a really good day.

  13. starvingardens says: Sep 9, 2013 11:32 AM

    I think what’s going to be considered special now, is how quarterbacks are able to win a game and throw for less than 150 yards!

  14. pftbillsfan says: Sep 9, 2013 11:33 AM

    It will also hurt the sport. The excitement is leaving and aside from rooting for a team to win your already seeing “league” fans decrease.

  15. blowpackblow says: Sep 9, 2013 11:33 AM

    150 yards passing is special in MN!

  16. skoobyfl says: Sep 9, 2013 11:37 AM

    It’ll be pillows & vests sooner than later.

  17. RussianBreadMaker says: Sep 9, 2013 11:39 AM

    when was it ever special? Lot’s of QBs have had big numbers due to playing from behind.

  18. blacknole08 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:40 AM

    Cam Newton threw for 400+ in the first 2 games of his career, with no training camp due to the lockout, but I see that doesn’t get mentioned in this article.

    Typical bias.

  19. patsfansknowitall says: Sep 9, 2013 11:40 AM

    Montana, Manning (s) > Brady

  20. wtfchiefs says: Sep 9, 2013 11:40 AM

    I think present day NFL has too much passing. I enjoyed watching dynamic or physical running games that set up the pass, and watching stone walling defenses. This current product is too pass happy. It’s really kind of boring, teams can just chuck a ball all over the field all game with ease. Receivers free to run routes and catch passes anywhere because secondaries aren’t allowed to hit and take over a zone through a physical presence. Passing means ratings though, so this is what it is now I guess.

  21. harrisonhits2 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:43 AM

    bucrightoff says:

    Football has been sissified to death by Goodell. In a few years a 5,000 yard season won’t even rate. Goodell has to go before he does irreversible harm to the game.
    __________________

    You have to realize that while Goodell is the mouthpiece, that he’s not the problem. The problem is the league attorneys and the fact that 4500 players and former players went through with the concussion lawsuit.

    Attorneys unfortunately control many aspects of American society now. And common sense rarely enters into anything. You want good, old fashioned, hard hitting football ? You’d think the attorneys would come up with a simple assumption of risk waiver that the players have to sign but apparently they’re still afraid of future lawsuits from players.

  22. akismet-75b0688a3b26a98b21428bf3bc7f7506 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:44 AM

    Why even add Eli in there, sure he got 400 yards.. 200 of those were Cowboys playing prevent and he was picked 3 times..

    This place is starting to sound a bunch now like ESPN..

    How hard can we spin those numbers..

  23. 9erssteve says: Sep 9, 2013 11:44 AM

    @myspaceyourface they expected SCORING to go up… and it DID.

    People pay to see TD’s, and the most exciting way to do that is with the pass. I remember the early 90′s where games were finishing 9-6 or 6-3. It was all field goals so they started enforcing PI calls harder and changed the rule regarding where the other team got the ball after a missed field goal.

    As a result the league got what it wanted in higher scores but unfortunately it meant AVERAGE QB’s like Eli being heralded as elite guess you cant have it all eh?

  24. jeremycrowhurst says: Sep 9, 2013 11:44 AM

    This same kind of column gets written every year. “Pretty soon, any QB who doesn’t throw for 6,000 will find himself on the chopping block.”

    Everybody knows that football in the 1970′s was different than football in the 1980′s (and 1960′s).

    By the way, remind me: when was the record for most passing yards in a game set? Oh yeah… 1951.

  25. jaxbeachjagfan says: Sep 9, 2013 11:44 AM

    “The 400-yard passing game is no longer special”

    —Said No One Remotely Connected to the Jaguars

  26. j0esixpack says: Sep 9, 2013 11:45 AM

    For non fantasy football fans a balanced offense with a win is the goal. There are plenty of blow outs where a QB on bad team has no choice but to put it in the air for a half. That’s never good.

  27. beach305 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:47 AM

    Like the NBA, the games rules have change to open up offenses. The days of big bruising power running backs are over. It’s now about spread offenses & no huddle.

    Lester Hayes, Steve Atwater, and those of the same elk would draw heavy fines in todays games.

    To me they need to simplify the rules on covering a WR since every game played today has a controversial penalty called on a DB. My feeling is that they allow contact without the need for DB’s to turn his head. It would slow down offenses but it would take the game away from the refs and thus more enjoyable.

  28. golforepar says: Sep 9, 2013 11:47 AM

    Don’t mention this in SF they crowned them selves as Sept paper champs allready!

  29. birddog23 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:47 AM

    Sure Jerry Garcia played better on drugs but he died when he was 50.

    Protecting passers and receivers is going to let football continue as a sport despite the fact that it waters down the game a bit.

    I’d take sober Garcia/”sissified football” over the alternative any day…

  30. fryeways says: Sep 9, 2013 11:50 AM

    As with all group statistics, you have to look at the standard deviation (the degree to which the best performances vary from the average) and not the frequency of the occurrence of the best performances. What was the average QB passing yardage total in week 1? So far, it’s 270 yards. This means a 300-yard game is still a strong outing, and a 400-yard game is still pretty darn special, even if three guys do it.

  31. beach305 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:53 AM

    Google the “Mel Blount Rule”

  32. jolink653 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:53 AM

    You can’t even breathe on a receiver without drawing a flag, so of course DBs have to play off of the receivers…average QBs these days are routinely throwing for 350

  33. citizenstrange says: Sep 9, 2013 11:55 AM

    Scoring over 7 points — and more than ZERO as in o.oooooo% during the first 58 minutes — against what was the worst defense in the entire NFL last year would be “special” for Roethlisberger.

  34. gobuccs1280 says: Sep 9, 2013 11:57 AM

    When most of the QB’s in the NFL throw for high 200′s to 400 yards in the opening week, I would suggest to you that it is not as much Rookies coming in more prepared to lead, as it is Defenses not being able to touch them. 17 QB’s have already thrown for 250 or above, and we still have 4 more QB’s to play tonight. 10 QB’s threw for 300+ yards.

  35. stabbymike says: Sep 9, 2013 12:02 PM

    i understand health is an issue but going into football you know theres a chance you can get a major injury. those millions of dollars dont jst go to a mansion and bugatti. it goes to your family and health. the nfl needs to nut up and stop calling bs penalties like the unnecessary roughness call against lavonte david.

  36. barrypftharrison says: Sep 9, 2013 12:04 PM

    In the 1970′s no coach would ever pass the ball if they were inside their own 20. Coaching has changed. They would have been just as successful back then but it was considered too great a risk to pass the ball near your goal. You could lose your job for that kind of call. Now it is considered normal to pass the ball anywhere. That adds a great deal of yards to a QB’s stats in a game also. (in addition to the rules changes)

  37. sampsonswag01 says: Sep 9, 2013 12:08 PM

    blacknole08 says:
    Sep 9, 2013 11:40 AM
    Cam Newton threw for 400+ in the first 2 games of his career, with no training camp due to the lockout, but I see that doesn’t get mentioned in this article.

    Typical bias.

    ————–

    No, not at all. It’s just because Cam sucks. No need to mention it at all. Cam is just picking up where he left off in his bad season last year.

  38. bigdicebuddha says: Sep 9, 2013 12:09 PM

    akismet-75b0688a3b26a98b21428bf3bc7f7506 says:
    Sep 9, 2013 11:44 AM
    Why even add Eli in there, sure he got 400 yards.. 200 of those were Cowboys playing prevent and he was picked 3 times..

    This place is starting to sound a bunch now like ESPN..

    How hard can we spin those numbers..
    —————————————————-

    Dallas was playing Prevent all game? Um, despite six turnovers, the Giants were driving for a winning score at the end of the game.

    Eli Manning threw for 450 yards, Nicks (114), Cruz (118), and Randle (101) all had over 100 yards recieving in the same game, which doesn’t really require much “spin” to be impressive.

  39. cheapglazers says: Sep 9, 2013 12:21 PM

    You forgot the new kickoff rule, and tackling rules too!

  40. wiley16350 says: Sep 9, 2013 12:22 PM

    There are a lot of factors involved. Success of the short passing game, especially screen passes. Throwing more on first and second down. Rules changes for safety reasons that inhibit defenders. Stricter enforcement of pass interference. These are the same reasons it is easier for rookie QB’s to be successful. I may do a more involved article on this on my website, greatestqb.com.

  41. wearethesteelers says: Sep 9, 2013 12:25 PM

    It’s a passing league. Hell, even Joe Flaccid had 350+. LOLOLOL

  42. beach305 says: Sep 9, 2013 12:27 PM

    1979 is when the NFL started to open up the passing game. That is when it was illegal to bump a WR after 5 yards.

    In 2004 they started to call Passing Penalties tougher.

    Then the QB changes of hitting low and head shots.

  43. malvaren18 says: Sep 9, 2013 12:33 PM

    Payton Manning should beat that record this year in route to another few records like 5th MVP

  44. beach305 says: Sep 9, 2013 12:34 PM

    Let’s take a timeout quickly. Why did we see a passing explosion in the late 1970s? Every passing number we’ve looked at so far centers on the passing boom in those years. There is one man to blame – Steelers Hall of Fame cornerback Mel Blount. Those of you that know your NFL history will recall the “Mel Blount Rule,” which went into effect for the 1978 season. This meant that defenders could only make contact with receivers within five yards of the line of scrimmage. Consequently, the passing game was opened up like never before. With wide receivers allowed to run freely, the game changed in favor of the passing offense in the late 70s. However, that is far from the entire story.

    Another “rule emphasis change” happened in 2004 as officials were encouraged to call more defensive holding and illegal contact penalties. “This came after Colts wide receivers were manhandled by the Patriots secondary in the ’03 Playoffs like New England was a vicious bunch of honey badgers. The rule “emphasis” laid down the law that first came with Mel Blount 25 years earlier. Even more rule changes followed to protect quarterbacks at the other end of the passing game. After Bengals QB Carson Palmer went down to a knee injury thanks to a low hit in the 2005 Playoffs, defenders couldn’t hit quarterbacks too high or too low. With both quarterbacks and receivers treated like they’re playing flag football, it’s no wonder the numbers have grown this dramatically.”

  45. scaredhitless says: Sep 9, 2013 12:41 PM

    “I disagree, 400 yards passing is special. It usually takes me two games to get there.” – Mark Sanchez

  46. gochargersgo says: Sep 9, 2013 12:52 PM

    I still dont understand the backlash against Goodell. He is the owner’s puppet, thought everyone had realized that by now.

  47. justintuckrule says: Sep 9, 2013 12:55 PM

    You are all wrong. The real reason is that the risk/reward has been turned on its ear.

    Back in the old days, passing was a big risk. It was harder to pass, qbs got hit, WRs got mugged, it was easier for DL to rush, etc., etc.

    Now, passing is LOW risk HUGE reward. QBs don’t get touched, DL don’t have as many freedom, WRs get to run free and not get hit, etc. etc. Even if the stars align and the d comes up with a big play, more often than not a flag will let the o off the hook. On the other hand, running is a huge risk with low reward. The risk of fumbling and a holding penalty to stall out a drive does not justify committing to the run game.

    Thank Goodell. He’s changed the game for the worse.

  48. All-American Voltron says: Sep 9, 2013 12:58 PM

    I also think there’s a lot more YAC because defenses either go for a highlight INT instead of tackling, or also go for big highlight reel hits, or ball stripping instead of tackling.

    In general teams go more for turnovers than stopping, and it works. 2009 Saints and 2010 Packers are great examples of that defensive philosophy.

  49. trollaikman8 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:08 PM

    A 400yd passing game is akin to a biblical miracle for the following offenses:

    Titans
    Stillers
    Vikings
    Jags
    Raiders

  50. bigbluenationdb says: Sep 9, 2013 1:20 PM

    The NFL is just the CFL on steroids. The day of teams being able to play defense are over. When is the last time the NFL did anything to help defenses. The game is nothing more then fantasy football.

  51. goindy2006 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:21 PM

    Holyhell:
    Norm Van Brocklin 554 years in 1951! Nice! ahh the good old days of football!

  52. timb12 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:25 PM

    There needs to be a balance. I don’t know how to restore it, but I played my friend at madden the other day and he insisted it was played on rookie. The score ended up being in the 80s and it was 0 fun. These feats are only impressive if they’re rare. Do something to toughen up the game

  53. notoriousjebus says: Sep 9, 2013 1:28 PM

    I think an interesting story would be why, up until Thursday night, no one had passed for 7 TD’s in a game since before the 1950? How can this be? I mean wasn’t football all 3 yards and a cloud of dust up until Namath? How were there guys throwing 7 TD’s in 1920-1950?

  54. dannersthemanners says: Sep 9, 2013 1:36 PM

    This was a really well written article. There were opinions, followed by facts that supported those opinions: “an argument”.

    Back in the old days, if you stated an opinion without supporting it with facts, it was a rare occurrence and no one gave it merit whatsoever. Today it seems as though it is an everyday thing (much like our 400 yard passing games). Media outlets like twitter, facebook, etc. are what makes this possible.

    I applaud this article’s writer.

    Ms. Lippy’s car is green.

    Billy likes snack packs.

  55. spfripp says: Sep 9, 2013 1:38 PM

    It just goes to show what Marino did during his time is nothing short of amazing. I think the only QB today that could play at the same level if he was to play under the old rules is Payton Manning.

  56. verticalgame510 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:39 PM

    400 yards is special. The QBs that have done it in week 1 are all trending towards the Hall of Fame. These aren’t average run of the mill QBs we’re talking about exceeding the 400 yard mark.

  57. psousa1 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:39 PM

    Here’s a start: take these friggin gloves off the receivers. these guys are catching balls like first baseman. These gloves are 100 times more effective than stickum ever could have been. QB’s can wind up with a fastball from 8 yards away and it will just stick to the gloves. Only way you can drop a ball is if you take your eye off it.
    You will see dropped passés galore.

    Also go back to the old days – pre 1978 in which you could knock the receiver off his route until the ball is in the air

    You’ll see running and defense come back in a hurry.

    Glad to see at least you can now hit the QB on these Read Option offenses instead of waiting for him to make a decision

    All the offense has become kind of boring. If a defensive player so much has a body temperature above 98.6 and they are within a yard of the QB they will get flagged. If a Def Back is stronger and can out muscle a receiver for the ball he gets flagged. But if a receiver tries to out muscle a Def Back for the ball there is no call.

  58. trollhammer20 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:40 PM

    What I’d find more interesting is: How often did teams who used to throw for those kinds of yards win the particular game that they did it in?

    I’m guessing here, but today, I get the feeling that at least half of today’s 400 yard plus games are a result of a losing team having to throw like crazy to stay in a game.

  59. ty46 says: Sep 9, 2013 1:44 PM

    “Pass interference, illegal contact and defensive holding are called much more stringently.” – BS

  60. justintuckrule says: Sep 9, 2013 2:00 PM

    If Goodell wasn’t such a hypocrite, he’d allow CBs to tussle with WRs until the ball is in the air. This would slow the game down and prevent concussions.

  61. jcav22 says: Sep 9, 2013 2:11 PM

    It has nothing to really do with the rules, it has to do with the low IQ of the players in the secondary nowadays.

    The majority of the secondary players out there are not special. They aren’t very bright and they get burned all the time. They go for big hits, vs fundamental tackling and don’t understand basic down and distance.

    Take for example the Dallas game, you had Victor Cruz run right by 2 defenders. Other parts of the game you had short yardage and you have CB playing 10 yards off the ball freeing up the WR to just do an easy slant for 20+ yards.

    The typical secondary player nowadays is just a shadow of the guys we had years ago that knew how to play the game, tackle and had high footbal IQs.

  62. BringBackTheFlex says: Sep 9, 2013 2:14 PM

    The change to the faster pace – the play clock – has also enabled more yards for QBs. But mostly it is the NBA effect of the rules changes.

  63. anarchopurplism says: Sep 9, 2013 2:19 PM

    500 is the new 400. BFD.

    The game is awesome. Peyton & Kaep put on a clinic.

    Super fun to watch. Major reason we all watch!

  64. nananatman says: Sep 9, 2013 2:21 PM

    Eli has 7, so he could beat Marino two, I still think it is special though because not every QB can do it, Pryor, Fitzpatrick, Quinn, D.A., Smith etc etc couldn’t do it plus the only upside the NY v Dallas game was the tenacity of the comeback and had it not been for one bonehead turnover (pick one of them, the last two) Giants win. Looking at it now, we have our Kiffin film and will have more film by the next meeting.

  65. nfl fan says: Sep 9, 2013 2:42 PM

    mp4philly says:
    Sep 9, 2013 11:30 AM
    Coincidentally, Eli Manning is on pace to throw 400 interceptions this season.
    —————————————————
    …and generations of eagles fans are still wondering what it feels like to win a SuperBowl.

  66. elvoid says: Sep 9, 2013 2:51 PM

    Just imagine what numbers and records guys like Unitas, Jurgenson, Tarkenton, Staubach would have put up had they played their careers under rules like we have today, 16 games a season. Those guys (and others I didn’t mention, of course) would have ridiculous numbers just like Manning, Brady, Brees & Co.

    By the same token, throw someone like Manning or Brady back into the 50′s – 70′s, and he’d still be great. His numbers would be nothing like they are today – but they’d likely be on par with the greats of that era.

    For better or worse, the game evolves – always has, always will.

  67. sylar1888 says: Sep 9, 2013 3:05 PM

    Let’s take a timeout quickly. Why did we see a passing explosion in the late 1970s? Every passing number we’ve looked at so far centers on the passing boom in those years. There is one man to blame – Steelers Hall of Fame cornerback Mel Blount. Those of you that know your NFL history will recall the “Mel Blount Rule,” which went into effect for the 1978 season. This meant that defenders could only make contact with receivers within five yards of the line of scrimmage. Consequently, the passing game was opened up like never before. With wide receivers allowed to run freely, the game changed in favor of the passing offense in the late 70s. However, that is far from the entire story.

    Another “rule emphasis change” happened in 2004 as officials were encouraged to call more defensive holding and illegal contact penalties. “This came after Colts wide receivers were manhandled by the Patriots secondary in the ’03 Playoffs like New England was a vicious bunch of honey badgers. The rule “emphasis” laid down the law that first came with Mel Blount 25 years earlier. Even more rule changes followed to protect quarterbacks at the other end of the passing game. After Bengals QB Carson Palmer went down to a knee injury thanks to a low hit in the 2005 Playoffs, defenders couldn’t hit quarterbacks too high or too low. With both quarterbacks and receivers treated like they’re playing flag football, it’s no wonder the numbers have grown this dramatically.”
    ——————————————————————————-
    Another “rule emphasis change” happened in 2004 as officials were encouraged to call more defensive holding and illegal contact penalties.

    Just to let you know, there wasn’t a rule change here 2004. I’m a Colts fan, and I remember that game like it was yesterday. The Pats defense was holding receivers 10-20 yards down the field (not manhandling). All the league did was enforce a rule that was in place, but was grossly neglected in that game, and a few others during that season.

  68. pats1977 says: Sep 9, 2013 3:06 PM

    Gooddell is solely accountable for this. He has officially succeeded in converting the NFL to the FFL.

  69. hauts81 says: Sep 9, 2013 3:19 PM

    As a Vikings fan I’d be happy with a 300-yard game once in a while. :(

  70. alexandrasmith11 says: Sep 9, 2013 3:26 PM

    I think a 175 yard passing game against the Jaguars is pretty special.

    Thanks, just throwing that out there.

    Alex Smith #11

  71. iamcline says: Sep 9, 2013 3:31 PM

    Well what do you expect? Teams aren’t allowed to play defense anymore. The league wants arena league offense, and they got it. What is funny is the media tries to pass off these stats like they’re an actual accomplishment. 10 years ago perhaps, but not anymore. If you can’t get 300 yards passing per game, then you need a new offense.

  72. beach305 says: Sep 9, 2013 3:50 PM

    Nothing like seeing old youtube videos of Riggins, Csonka and Cambell running over people.

    Bring back the old NFL

  73. BringBackTheFlex says: Sep 9, 2013 3:55 PM

    Mel Blount was a cheap shot artist. Receivers routinely got injured in games where they didn’t even get the ball thrown to them. Blount could be seen kicking receivers that he knocked down. He was was the Ronnie Lott of his era – no class, no technique, just pure violence. Like Lott, Blount looked best when his victims weren’t looking. Like Lott, when a back or receiver met him head-on Blount was trounced.

  74. axespray says: Sep 10, 2013 2:09 PM

    Every Defense has a hole too nowadays…
    Back when it was a 28 team league, you had more of a chance that every Defense would be good top to bottom (mid 90s cowboys/packers – late 90s Bucs).

    Do we really need the jags/chargers/bucs/cards ?
    Take away those four teams, let the other 28 get all their good players – you’d see a lot better defense.

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