NFLPA plans to explore whether Pryor went to sideline after concussion

AP

The NFL Players Association remains concerned about the manner in which Raiders quarterback Terrelle Pryor’s concussion was handled during a Monday night game in Denver.

And for good reason.  A full two minutes and 50 seconds passed from the time Pryor took the concussion-inducing helmet-to-helmet hit and the next snap.

The game broadcast doesn’t show whether Pryor went to the sideline between plays; Raiders coach Dennis Allen has said Pryor did.

Terrelle came over,” Allen explained on Tuesday.  “We were talking about the next play; he didn’t show any signs of any concussion or anything like that.  We put him back in the game, and then when he came back over to the sideline that’s when our medical people took a look at him and decided that we needed to send him into the locker room for further evaluation.”

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the NFLPA plans to review the available game film to confirm whether Pryor indeed went to the sideline.

In exploring this issue, the NFLPA realizes that the sideline area can be chaotic during a game, and that not every concussion or other injury can be immediately spotted in real time.  But the union also doesn’t want the chaos to provide cover for not being vigilant about ensuring that a player who may have a concussion is evaluated properly.

Otherwise, the league and its teams risk a catastrophic outcome, in which a concussed player remains in the game, suffers another concussion, and has a severe — and perhaps fatal — consequence.

14 responses to “NFLPA plans to explore whether Pryor went to sideline after concussion

  1. Otherwise, the league and its teams risk a catastrophic outcome, in which a concussed player remains in the game, suffers another concussion, and has a severe — and perhaps fatal — consequence.
    ——-
    Is there proof of something like this ever happening?? I’ve heard of a player dying on the field because of a broken neck, but not because of 2 back to back concussions. This is just fear mongoring.

  2. Hey here’s an idea, why doesn’t florio review all the game tape for possible concussions that the team’s don’t notice…then he could send them in for possible disciplinary action. smh

  3. Easy cop out. He didn’t show any signs of a concussion. Well no kidding if you aren’t trained or qualified or attempting to find those signs. That doesn’t mean he didn’t have them. That just means you were convenient to miss them if they were present. This coach doesn’t understand what’s going on nor does he respect the importance of safety even.

  4. The medical staff can’t possibly examine every player coming to the sidelines after taking a hit. It is incumbent on the player to notify the staff if there is a problem. I think if someone had noticed something obvious they would have kept him out of the game but apparently he seemed normal.

  5. The NFLPA wants their cake and eat it too. You can’t give players safety if they don’t report the injury. I am sure Pryor was educated about concussions. He is a grown man.

    There should be just as much responsibility for reporting a real injury. Tell Goodell to fine players who don’t.

    If I pulled everyone who hit their head playing football on TV I am pretty sure I wouldnt be watching football much longer.

  6. So Dennis Allen’s not even a Doctor of Neurology? how convenient. Gee thanks for the strategy tip there expert.

  7. tinbender2000:

    He doesn’t have to be a doctor.

    If you go back to my comment you will see that being qualified or trained is one way to spot them, but there is a third “or” for simply attempting to find the signs which any basic competent human being could do, and a Head Coach should be minimally competent in understanding how to do that and to pay attention and stay on top of basic things such as protocol and making sure his players aren’t being subjected to excessively dangerous situations that they shouldn’t be exposed to.

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