Vikings stadium will have personal seat licenses, with a different name

While guys from sea to shining sea continue to install microwave ovens as part of a custom kitchen delivery, NFL teams continue to find ways to get money for nothing.

The personal seat license, the P.R.-crafted name for charging fans a large lump sum for the mere right to buy tickets, has spread to Minnesota, where the new venue will include a “Stadium Builders License” (P.R. speak for “don’t think of it as a Personal Seat License, even though it is”) for roughly 75 percent of the seats.

Fans won’t be gouged; the expected average will be $2,500, with 10,000 seats at $1,000 or less and the maximum no more than $10,000.  Still, the concept of making people pay for nothing will rub some people the wrong way.

Governor Mark Dayton continues to be rubbed the wrong way by the program.

“As far as I’m concerned, personally, $1 for a personal seat license is $1 too much,” Dayton said, via the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

Then again, they’ll still pay.  And if/when (when) they do, the program will yield a maximum contribution of $125 million toward the stadium.  Which is $125 million less than the Vikings or the NFL will have to come up with.

That ain’t working.  That’s definitely the way you do it.

32 responses to “Vikings stadium will have personal seat licenses, with a different name

  1. I don’t get it…why do people put up with PSLs. Football in HD is better anyway. Just spring for a game once or twice a year and you’ll come out ahead. Don’t complain if you’re going to pay it.

  2. “As far as I’m concerned, personally, $1 for a personal seat license is $1 too much,”

    Exactly. It seems like the Vikings ownership is dead set on getting a brand new stadium for free.

  3. I’ve been a season ticket holder for 11 years. I have 4 seats in the lower part of the upper deck on the Vikings sideline. If not for PSLs I would keep my tickets for life.

    If I’m charged $2,500 per seat that’s a $10,000 price tag. No way I can justify that.

    Sorry Vikings — I’ll spend half that on a new 70 inch HDTV and save my money from the $8 beers at the stadium 8 Sundays every fall

    I’ll buy a game here or there on StubHub but that’s it.

  4. That’s a years salary for your average Minnesotan. That, plus the fact that there are only 7 or 8 people who are truly “fans” of the Vikings, and I don’t see theses licenses doing well.

    After all, this is a franchise that relies on local corporations to avoid blackouts.

    >

  5. There is an entire generation of PFT readers who missed 100% of the jokes in this post.

    That said, it seems Viking fans are truly in dire straits.

  6. “Fans won’t be gouged; the expected average will be $2,500 ” for the privilege of then being able to buy tickets to the seats that you now “own”(which you really dont). $5000 average for 2 seats, what a crock. Not a bad as some teams but really!?!?!?

  7. I am always amazed when people complain about PSL’s. These stadiums have to be paid for by someone – so it’s either the taxpayers, the owners, or the consumers (usually a mix of all three). If there are no PSL’s, some of that cost probably gets shifted to the taxpayers. Taxpayers get soaked over and over again by these stadium deals, so at least the PSL’s lighten the load a bit.

  8. Ok, now I get it. Sid Hartman is reporting the money is needed for the specially reinforced seat bottoms that will hold up under their morbidly obese fanbase.

    C’mon you cheap Viking fans – we don’t need any more structures in MN collapsing.

  9. PSL gives you the first right to buy tickets for all events at the stadium, not just football. It is a one time fee that you pay, and a license you can sell. I bought a PSL for the Ravens in 2001 for $500. Someone in my row just sold their PSL for $5,000

  10. I’m a Panther PSL holder. In Carolina the stadium was financed with PSL’s and no public money. That was what I thought the beauty of PSL’s were. The taxpayers who didn’t want to finance a stadium didn’t have to. Only the fans who wanted to were charged for PSL’s. Selling PSL’s and using tax payer dollars sucks.

  11. I would like to see an article identifying teams with and without PSLs.

    I know people like to hate on my Skins, but that stadium was built by the owner on his property with no public funds and no PSLs.

  12. I get a kick out of the Packer fans making fun of the PSL deal. Um, technically your worthless pieces of paper that make you a “team owner” are the same damn thing. Nobody is making you buy them, just like nobody is being forced to buy a PSL. Yeah it sucks, but its the price you gotta pay if you want season tickets (over half the teams in the NFL use them now).

  13. And just where are degenerate Viking fans supposed to come up with that kind of money?

    It’s not cheap keeping their 300 lb. women fed. $2500 = 5 cars to those people. Or 2 years worth of trailer payments.

  14. The Wilfs might get a blister on their little finger, maybe will get a blister on their thumb when counting all that PSL money that they will receive.

  15. Good luck selling all those PSL’s in Minnesota! Many of us are already disgusted with the amount of public money going into this deal. Now it turns out the Wilfs are only putting up 10% of the cost themselves, and getting 200 mil from the NFL as well as expecting PSL’s to generate the rest of the “team’s” portion of the cost.

    I hope very very few people buy them. It’s a BS fee that is charged to give you the privilege of being able to pay another fee lol! KFAN researched the resale prices of PSL’s around the league, in the majority of markets the resale value of your “investment” in a PSL plummeted to between 10% and 40% of original cost within 4 years.

    If they do not sell, the Wilfs are on the hook for the stadium funding they are counting on PSL’s to cover.

  16. Ring, ring.

    “Hello, thanks for calling Target, how can I help you?”

    “Yes, my name is Zygi, any interest in purchasing some Minnesota Vikings tickets? We’re kinda in a jam over here….”

    “How many this time?”

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