West Virginia high school player passes away due to brain injury

Dylan Jeffries, 17, passed away on Sunday night due to brain injury suffered while playing high school football.

Dylan attended South Harrison High School in West Virginia.  He had been in a medically-induced coma following surgery to remove a blood clot from his brain.  Dylan collapsed during a September 27 game.

His injury pulled together a community that has six different high schools, with students and players from all over the county attending a prayer vigil, raising funds, and wearing helmet stickers this past weekend to honor Dylan.

It’s the worst nightmare for any parent, regardless of how it happens.  And Dylan’s family will be in our thoughts and our prayers.Dylan’s family is raising money to offset the medical expenses, if you’d like to contribute.

16 responses to “West Virginia high school player passes away due to brain injury

  1. This is happening because coaches are not teaching proper tackling in any way shape or form…we can scream over and over about concussions and the danger of them but coaches are not getting it. Tell me the last time you saw a solid form tackle as opposed to some leaned in with the head projectile type big hit? At any level….Any level….

    This is an absolute shame and I can’t imagine losing one of my children to something like this.

    The culture will not change until the coaches at these levels chose to make it change.

    Google heads up football and find out how crazy easy it is to teach kids the proper way to initiate contact.

  2. On this post alone, three kids die of football injuries in HS within the last month. In no way is this a complete list. What is the benefit of HS football that is worth this price?

  3. Sad for this to happen. People ask if high school football is worth the price of these kids’ deaths but that is hard to measure. Sometimes, there are freak accidents. Sometimes, the death can be a wake-up call to poor equipment or technique, so that person’s death can lead to drastic changes so that their death isn’t in vain. To the dead child or their families it doesn’t benefit them, but in the grand scheme their death saved lives.

    High schools often cut corners with substandard equipment and the equipment manager who is not an euqipment manager at all but doubling as the science teacher. They don’t know how to measure the air in the helmets or to ensure that each kid gets a pair of shoulder pads or helmet pads that actually fit them, or how to tell when either pad or equipment should be discarded and/or be willing to discard antiquated equipment and padding without concern for the budget.

    THIS is what needs to get fixed in high school athletics. The training of the head coaches and “Heads Up” programs are great, but the training of equipment managers and when to discard old worn out pads and helmets needs to be revised.

  4. I’m not denying the importance, severity and sadness of this news, but this story is should be in the CollegeFootballTalk thread and not here. Sorry Florio, but just because it’s your alma matter doesn’t elevate the matter to this thread. Plus, as others have pointed out this has happened in other parts of the country. That being said, my prayers and sympathy are his family.

  5. viguy007 says: Oct 7, 2013 11:42 AM

    On this post alone, three kids die of football injuries in HS within the last month. In no way is this a complete list. What is the benefit of HS football that is worth this price?
    __________________________________

    Since over a million kids play football in high school, I would bet that, if you banned the sport, there would be more than that number of deaths to that same number of high school football players by some other method (car accidents, alcohol and/or drugs, weapons, etc.). Sometimes you just have to look at the big picture.

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