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How did racial element of Incognito’s comments get overlooked?

Richie Incognito, Jonathan Martin AP

In August, video emerged of Eagles receiver Riley Cooper using a racial epithet at a Kenny Chesney concert.  For the next several days, it was the dominant topic in the NFL, and it created real issues in the Philly locker room.

Last Monday, a transcript emerged of a voice message in which Dolphins guard Richie Incognito used the same term — preceded by “half” — toward Dolphins tackle Jonathan Martin.  Somehow, the same outrage and consternation never emerged.

Even before members of the Dolphins excused Richie for using the term, the reaction among the media and fans and NFL players was muted.  It’s almost as if the Riley Cooper situation desensitized the sports world.

It didn’t desensitize Shannon Sharpe of CBS.  As shared by Peter King of TheMMQB.com, Sharpe expressed eloquent outrage over a white player’s casual use of the term.

“The Miami Dolphins locker room probably consists of 75 to 80 percent blacks,” Sharpe said.  “If you allow Richie Incognito to walk around in an open locker room and to use a racial epithet that most black Americans, all black Americans, know the . . . hate and the vitriol that comes with that word, you are encouraging him to do that.  I read, and I don’t know, this is alleged, that some black players said Richie Incognito was an honorary black.  There is no such thing. This tells me everything I need to know about the Miami Dolphins locker room.

“Maybe it’s me. Just ask your parents. Ask your grandparents. The mountain that they climbed so a black person in America could have respect, could have dignity, and you allow this in an open locker room to take place is unacceptable. I’m so disappointed. . . .  Because if you’re black, you know what that word means.”

Also not desensitized was Hines Ward of NBC’s Football Night in America.

“Being biracial myself, I understand Jonathan Martin, because I had to deal with some of those same issues growing up,” Ward said during Sunday’s show.  “As a child, I was bullied and discriminated against because I was of mixed race.  I heard some of the guys throughout the league say that Jonathan Martin should be a man and fight back.  But for me it takes a bigger man to walk away from the situation. [I]n the locker room we don’t play with the ‘N’ word. When a guy calls another man of the opposite race the ‘N’ word, there are no more games being played.”

To their credit, the Dolphins hadn’t been desensitized either.  Something allowed them to immediately suspend Incognito after receiving the voice message last Sunday, and that something quite likely was Incognito’s use of the “N” word toward Martin.

But the use of the racial slur by Incognito — at a time when there’s increasing debate over whether “Redskins” is a racial slur — somehow has been disregarded by folks who are instead arguing over minutiae like whether Martin’s “I will murder your whole f–king family” text message to Incognito shows that Martin was a participant in the rough-and-tumble locker-room banter when Martin simply was forwarding an Internet meme to Incognito and not actually typing the words with his fingers and thumbs.

While the distinction is important for assessing the credibility of Incognito’s defense, perhaps there needs to be more discussion about the indefensible thing he said to Martin, even if Incognito was indeed just joking.

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85 Responses to “How did racial element of Incognito’s comments get overlooked?”
  1. doctorrustbelt says: Nov 11, 2013 10:17 AM

    Golf club.

  2. johnnyoclock says: Nov 11, 2013 10:21 AM

    Here’s a line from the show Mad Men, I wish I thought of this but I believe in giving proper credit, regarding this issue:

    “He knows how to make a good apology or else he’d be dead”

    Incognito, given all the second, third and fourth chances he’s gotten, is apparently “that guy”.

  3. nokoolaidcowboy says: Nov 11, 2013 10:21 AM

    The NFL is a workplace, complete with a union for it’s players and all. So yes, the behavior needs to improve. Guys have the right to come and put some work in without any extra-curricular nonsense if they choose.

    But where was the OL coach in all this? Did he not see what was going on with Incognito’s behavior both inside and outside the workplace?

    It was never difficult to substantiate that this guy was only going to continually get into trouble.

  4. annes22 says: Nov 11, 2013 10:24 AM

    Who cares what Shannon Sharp has to say? No too many are going to listen to him, he has always had too much to say. He’s horrible on the football show. he should go and sit next to Tom Jackson and they can get on their “soap box” together.

  5. azarkhan says: Nov 11, 2013 10:24 AM

    Shannon Sharpe was “eloquent”? That’s a first.

  6. doctorrustbelt says: Nov 11, 2013 10:27 AM

    I bet richie incognito still wears a livestrong bracelet.

  7. tundratommy says: Nov 11, 2013 10:28 AM

    To a larger degree, why does the racial element of the music industry’s lyrics continue to get overlooked?

  8. Grulks says: Nov 11, 2013 10:28 AM

    “[I]n the locker room we don’t play with the ‘N’ word. When a guy calls another man of the opposite race the ‘N’ word, there are no more games being played.”

    Wrong, dummy. Allowing anyone to use it creates the impression at best that it is ok to use it, and at worse its ok if only black people use it.

    There’s a term saying it’s ok for one race to do/have something, and not for another race. It’s called racism. Hines, you sounds dangerously close to saying its ok or not as bad, if black people use the term.

    It’s an evil term, meant in jest or not. Either make it ok for anyone to use it, or make it taboo for everyone (including rap stars, NFL athletes trash talking each other, and even friends on COD). Until then, racism will persist.

  9. doctorrustbelt says: Nov 11, 2013 10:28 AM

    Tom Jackson is a high character class act.

  10. jacobslatter says: Nov 11, 2013 10:28 AM

    Jesse Jackson nor Al Sharpton won’t involve themselves because of the half quotient.

  11. freepretzels says: Nov 11, 2013 10:33 AM

    Because its two different guys and context is everything.

    Cooper was a FL hick that went to a country concert and used the word in connection with an intent for actual violence. The locker room knew what kind guy he was.

    Incognito finally found a place where he fit. Whatever his language was, the black guys there knew he wasn’t a racist.

  12. radford7 says: Nov 11, 2013 10:40 AM

    Bravo for Hines Ward and Shannon Sharpe for their statements, M.L.K. didn’t fight for the right of equality so “The N Word” could be used casually by both Black and Whites. NO ONE should be allowed to use that word, it shows disrespect to older black Americans who suffered the indignity of prejudice and hate.

  13. shenanigans24 says: Nov 11, 2013 10:40 AM

    How about because people aren’t stupid and they understand context. Perhaps these guys should turn on the radio in the last 20 years or listen to how some people use it as every other word.

    It’s quite clear that Martin, Incognito and many other players used the word when they talked to each other and none of them found it offensive. Sharp doesn’t get to choose what other people must be offended by. If Martin found it so offensive than he shouldn’t have used it and laughed when others did. I would say the Cooper case is worse because of context.

  14. illinininer says: Nov 11, 2013 10:40 AM

    In my opinion, what makes the impact of his use of the word so different than the Riley Cooper situation is the fact that all we’ve been given is a transcript. There is no video and we haven’t heard the audio to hear the tone in which it was said.

  15. blackandbluedivision says: Nov 11, 2013 10:41 AM

    People are lost in the context. I as a successful black man always hate the term and hate it being used towards me. But, I am always aware that somewhere, somehow someone considers me to be a n—-a (or -er). No matter how much of a contribution to society I make. That disdain and hatred will always be there by someone (I’ve seen it first hand too).

    That being said Incognito crossed a line. Martin’s parents are educated and successful members of society. The fact that he stooped so law to call them a n—a is where the line was drawn.

    It may be fine in that twisted lockerroom to call each other that word but when you call a man’s parent that term. There’s your line.

  16. bagadeez04 says: Nov 11, 2013 10:42 AM

    Pobably because everyone knows this guy is a scumbag? Riley Cooper was a relative unknown.

    Sometimes it’s better not to give a guy like this the attention he probably craves.

  17. solidarityrules says: Nov 11, 2013 10:42 AM

    Dolphins were set to challenge Patriots for the division this year. They tanked before this stuff came out — was this sort of locker room atmosphere the background to falling apart?

    When the issue emerged, the franchise suspended Incognito, but everything else that could be done badly was. Players fought their battles in the media. No players seem to have had the leadership to talk things out internally, to keep the media out of it, and to move forward as a team. And the coaches don’t seem to have tried to do so either.

    When a white player is using the N-word about a black player, and no one is going ballistic and shutting it down, you don’t have a team.

  18. ejbigg says: Nov 11, 2013 10:42 AM

    Uh… what?

    How is it being overlooked? This article essentially disproves its own headline. Sharpe and Ward both shared their feelings on national tv, in the interview on Fox Incognito was specifically asked about it, and the article even mentions that was likely the main reason the Dolphins suspended him, so how is it overlooked?

    And even if it has been overlooked, is it really any question why? There’s a bigger problem with this situation than just the potential racist undertones.

  19. abninf says: Nov 11, 2013 10:42 AM

    It appears Incognito used it as a term of endearment, not an insult. If he used it as a racially charged insult, like Cooper, I get a feeling the black players in his locker room would not have his back. But they do. You keep trying to create drama with the racist angle but it’s not working. I do not care what TV commentators say. They represent the media. Enough said there.

  20. voiceofrealism says: Nov 11, 2013 10:47 AM

    There are plenty of racial insults for every race. Plenty of people who have been treated horribly. But blacks think they deserve special treatment if someone uses a racial slur against them. It’s wrong to use them against anyone, but only has power if you let it.

    My guess is in the locker room, any insult that will work will be used. If you aren’t affected by one, it won’t be used anymore. Children learn this, but black adults seem unable.

  21. steelerben says: Nov 11, 2013 10:48 AM

    As much as I am a proponent of removing racial epithets from the national vocabulary, if collectively as a group the team has decided that they do not mind it being used it does two things. First off, by taking a word that was intended to be hateful and making it a term of endearment, it removes the power of the word. Much like when the word “queer” was taken away from bigots. Second off, it is helping to defeat racism by not drawing distinctions between races and giving a separate set of rules. Saying it is okay for one black man to say it to another, but not for a white man to say it, even when the person it is being said to is alright with it, perpetuate racial divides, which is obvious counter to the goals of the speakers.

    While in a perfect world, everyone would be nice to each other and no one would call anyone else names. But here in the real world, using it the way that Icognito did will remove the sting from it being used the way that Cooper did.

  22. granadafan says: Nov 11, 2013 10:50 AM

    Jay Glazer is Richie’s buddy. They work out together in the offseason, so no wonder Glazer would give Richie a softball interview.

    That said, the racial element is a sideshow compared to the regular bullying and forcing guys like Martin out of the league.

  23. blackandbluedivision says: Nov 11, 2013 10:50 AM

    voiceofrealism says:
    Nov 11, 2013 10:47 AM
    There are plenty of racial insults for every race. Plenty of people who have been treated horribly. But blacks think they deserve special treatment if someone uses a racial slur against them. It’s wrong to use them against anyone, but only has power if you let it.

    My guess is in the locker room, any insult that will work will be used. If you aren’t affected by one, it won’t be used anymore. Children learn this, but black adults seem unable.
    _________________________

    yea, last I checked most people of every race is offended by racial slurs. Just ask the team in Washington.

  24. tfaulk says: Nov 11, 2013 10:51 AM

    Claiming the racism element is overlooked is nonsense. If it weren’t for the racial slurs in the voicemail, this issue would likely be resolved by now. Or at least the court of public opinion would be adjourned.

  25. lks311 says: Nov 11, 2013 10:51 AM

    Riley Cooper’s comments didn’t desensitize fans. Riley’s comments were directed at complete strangers while he was drunk out of his mind. Incognito’s were sober and measured—and specific. From the evidence, it seems he had a thing against Martin—not all blacks. And that’s why his Miami black teammates gave him a pass and why Philly’s players remain cool towards Cooper. Doesn’t make it right, just explains why.

  26. tominma says: Nov 11, 2013 10:52 AM

    My, my, just LOOK at all these people who are trying to justify or make excuses for what Incognito did! Seems to m, the sooner Incognito goes incognito, the better!

    It is what it is. He did what he did. Time to pay the piper!

  27. blackandbluedivision says: Nov 11, 2013 10:53 AM

    ejbigg says:
    Nov 11, 2013 10:42 AM
    Uh… what?

    How is it being overlooked? This article essentially disproves its own headline. Sharpe and Ward both shared their feelings on national tv, in the interview on Fox Incognito was specifically asked about it, and the article even mentions that was likely the main reason the Dolphins suspended him, so how is it overlooked?

    And even if it has been overlooked, is it really any question why? There’s a bigger problem with this situation than just the potential racist undertones.
    _____________________________

    Not really. I’ve seen a lot of commentators on TV swerve around the subject up until this past Sunday. I watched Tim Hasselbeck and Mike and Mike go on rants about the fact that Martin allegedly was upset about having to foot the bill for the Vegas trip and having to pay tens of thousands of dollars for team dinners and skip over the voicemail.

  28. arwiv says: Nov 11, 2013 10:54 AM

    Hey Shannon…..maybe not everyone was raised in the south….maybe a lot of black people DONT know what the word means.

  29. ufourya says: Nov 11, 2013 10:54 AM

    “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never harm me.”

    I learned this little ditty as a child. We have taken political correctness beyond the absurd, and the proof is that the Jon n’ Richie saga overshadows everything else in football right now. More words are being written about it than anything else.

    Sad.

  30. 3yardsandacloud says: Nov 11, 2013 10:56 AM

    1) The use of the “N” word in a locker room setting is something that has gone on for a long time and without objection. I used to say “what up my N****?” to my black teammates. I was mimicking how they greeted fellow black teammates and it was never an issue because our relationship was such that it was acceptable. You could ask anyone on my team, or anyone that knows me or has met me and each would tell you I’m not a racist and I couldn’t be further from a racist. A locker room is a tough dynamic to understand looking in from the outside. I understand the issue here and the negative connotation that the word carries and it’s not something I’d ever just use in some other setting. When you compare it with Riley Cooper’s use, it’s completely opposite because he is using it as an insult, meant to be insulting and comign from a racist place, i.e. a dislike of black people. Its the relationship between the parties and their personal lines that matters.

    2) Just because Jon Martin sent his “murder your whole family” on a meme does not dissipate the injurious message. If you are going to hold Incognito to the “I’ll kill you” in a laughing voicemail, then Martin gets the same standard. I don’t think either meant it as a literal threat. It was two guys messing around. Nevermind the fact that what “victim of bullying” contacts his bully and has conversations?

    I think the joking with Incognito was grabbed by more teammates and then everyone kept chiming in. I’m willing to bet a locker room of teasing eventually caused Martin to walk. They should all sit down, discuss the issues and apologize for taking it too far on both sides and get back to playing football.

  31. furtigan says: Nov 11, 2013 10:57 AM

    “The Miami Dolphins locker room probably consists of 75 to 80 percent blacks,”
    ————–
    Yes. Those are the people best positioned to attest to what these people really are like. And by all accounts, they overwhelmingly support Icognito.

    And I’d bet everything I own that Shannon Sharpe has used “the word which must not be said” a hundred times, when angry or joking if nothing else.

  32. jason8er says: Nov 11, 2013 10:57 AM

    The media is still portraying Incognito’s VM as a hate filled rant? Wow guys, you set your self aggrandizing narrative from the beginning, and no matter what comes to light showing your spectacular fail, you just keep beating that drum. That, and the incredible rush to only put Martin’s texts “into context” was very telling indeed.

  33. beelicker says: Nov 11, 2013 10:59 AM

    You are missing the contextural point here. “Honorary black guy” Incognito was using the “half-n” term to disparage the educated & articulate Martin for NOT BEING BLACK ENOUGH to fit in acceptably among the dominant paradigm within the Dolphins’ locker room.

    Incognito was fully integrated & accepted into this paradigm & was directed to ‘blacken up’ Martin.

    Incognito’s use of the so-called “n-word” here was in the vein of ‘acceptable’ “black on black” colloquial usage among his peers in that locker room …

    The ‘racism’ in this locker room was the dominant black paradigm ‘discriminating’ against Martin for not fitting in b y being too white …

  34. mlmike25 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:00 AM

    I was anti-Incognito when the story first broke, but as more info comes out about their relationship, I think I’m changing on that.

    The more I hear about this situation, the more I think this was just how these guys interacted with each other… and it probably wasn’t a problem for Martin, until it was. Then all the dirty laundry came out.

    We’ve all had a friend that we’ve ragged on, probably pretty hard. That guy might’ve gotten us back a time or two, but as long as one party doesn’t feel like it went too far, it never really becomes an issue.

  35. natigator says: Nov 11, 2013 11:01 AM

    How about letting the people the comment was directed to (or towards) choose the level of offense in which they take. Incognito threw it out there rather liberally and outside of Martin (whom by the way we do NOT know if he was offended by the use of that word, the killing of his family vague threats, other incidents, or a combination thereof), none of his other teammates seemed to care.

    It seems ingenuine to inject yourself into a situation where you don’t know the tone or context in which the comment is given, and proclaim outrage.

    Also difficult to wrap my head around the fact that an offensive word is perfectly fine for some folks to say, but absolutely offensive for others to say.

  36. csp16 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:07 AM

    ejbigg says: Nov 11, 2013 10:42 AM

    Uh… what?

    How is it being overlooked? This article essentially disproves its own headline. Sharpe and Ward both shared their feelings on national tv, in the interview on Fox Incognito was specifically asked about it, and the article even mentions that was likely the main reason the Dolphins suspended him, so how is it overlooked?

    And even if it has been overlooked, is it really any question why? There’s a bigger problem with this situation than just the potential racist undertones.

    Great post. In response to Florio accusing his opponents of arguing minutiae about Martin being involved in the rough and tumble locker room, what of his argument that because Martin sent a meme of a woman and a cute dog with the words “I’m going to murder your whole family,” the intent is different than typing the actual message. Minutiae? Irrelevant? There are only two motivations behind sending a message like that, whether typed or in a cute picture, malicious intent, or jocularity. The world sees it for what it is, Florio pushes his agenda forward. Admirable, really.

  37. finfan79 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:08 AM

    Bla bla bla……….Its a word. Words have different meaning to different people. When a room full of black players use it casually as a term of friendship, it doesn’t suddenly become a slur just because a white person dares to speak it. Most white folk know better than to even go there, but on occasion, one of us crackers slips up and says the dreaded N-word. It doesn’t automatically make that person a racist bigot.

    Richie was apparently using it fairly often. None of his black teammates objected. Is Richie a meathead? Yes. A racist? Hardly.

    White America has pretty much allowed the word to become extinct. Black America has not. So if we are in agreement that the N-word is so vile that it shouldn’t ever be spoken, memos need to go out to South Central & Harlem, because Dubuque is already in line. If however portions of Black America decide that they enjoy the phrase, then we need to stop screaming from the rooftops every time it is spoken by a honkey, regardless of context.

    I’ve said my peace. Carry on my

  38. myeaglescantwin says: Nov 11, 2013 11:14 AM

    the racial aspect was over looked on one basis.

    The teammates of Richie , black and white, both came to his defense instantly. The support in this situation came from the players that spend each day with him.

    While the words were vulgar and unnecessary to us, apparently, they were said in jest and jokingly.

    Cooper on the other hand, had no backing from his team and it was ever more apparent that he was speaking from a place of drunken hate..

    the “ger -vs- ga” pronunciations in each instance of the word, make a world of difference to culture of these 21st century athletes .

  39. cowboylover says: Nov 11, 2013 11:19 AM

    To further address the comments made here about Riley Cooper, I’m willing to bet he’s not a racist, either. When someone wants to insult another human being, the tendency is to use the one word against them that they know is a hot button. In the heat of the moment, the protagonist will use a hateful word to hurt the other person–they will key in on the very name that makes the intended victim the most insecure. It’s not coming from a place of racism, just from an ugly place of hatefulness at that moment. The Incognito/Martin thing should be examined under a different microscope, such as, not using hateful words or demeaning language of any type toward a friend. I just don’t get their relationship at all.

  40. CKL says: Nov 11, 2013 11:20 AM

    blackandbluedivision says:
    Nov 11, 2013 10:41 AM
    People are lost in the context. I as a successful black man always hate the term and hate it being used towards me. But, I am always aware that somewhere, somehow someone considers me to be a n—-a (or -er). No matter how much of a contribution to society I make. That disdain and hatred will always be there by someone (I’ve seen it first hand too).
    ________________________________
    EXACTLY…the irrational people who hate you for something absolutely meaningless as far as judgment of a person (like skin color) will always hate you for that . That can’t be legislated away. Unless they have positions of power over you and/or are affecting your livlihood or family directly, better just to let them show how ignorant they are so they can be judged (and ignored as irrelevant fools) accordingly.

    I hate namecalling and I don’t think anyone should be called racist terms or anything like that, but I cannot think of very many people who weren’t ostracized, called names, teased, picked on etc as kids and even as adults in some form or fashion. I know I was. I remember, it was hurtful of course, but it’s what people of all ages do. It’s part of being in the animal kingdom in general, social ranking. It’s a little silly for some media to act like this is some horrendous tragedy instead of something that’s certainly not a good thing, but quite commonplace.

  41. dvnelson72 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:21 AM

    I’ve never used the word. I wouldn’t.

    I am a dolphins fan. Incognito is done with the team — regardless of how the narrative plays out.

    Martin should be done with football. His reps are trying to tear a club down. What club will want him?

    CORNWELL – I want to HEAR the Incognito voicemail. I want to hear the tone, instead of reading the transcript.

    The fact that we only have a transcript suggests 2 possibilies: 1) it came off as a bad joke 2) they are waiting to release it as part of the slow drip of bad news

  42. dvnelson72 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:21 AM

    OH — Glazer — I want to see the full transcript of the 1100+ text messages

  43. doctorrustbelt says: Nov 11, 2013 11:26 AM

    Great interview by the guy who trained and has a long term relationship with richie incognito.

    What a joke.

  44. mrbullgator says: Nov 11, 2013 11:28 AM

    Shannon,
    I’m sure you have no problem using that word when cohorting amongst your friends and kin. The moment a white man says it, he becomes villified. This is the problem here. NO ONE should be allowed to say the word!! Blacks should be offended if another black man calls him that word or another white man. What I do see is in the recent years more blacks and whites have become intermingled to the point where friends are friends and taking offense to something because of someone’s skin color is not a big deal. I see a little hope in this but also think the word should not be uttered by anyone. I am still waiting on the ACTUAL voice message though, I want to hear Incognito’s tone in the message.

  45. romosmicrodongs says: Nov 11, 2013 11:30 AM

    profiteers stoke the division

  46. ahs2 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:33 AM

    minutiae?!?! Tell ya what, calling me a name and meaning it is far different from threatening to kill my family & mean it but apparently you are willing to differentiate and judge. Oh, “context” you say…well, then you should be aware that you DO NOT KNOW the context of their private messages other than what Incognito has said…Martin is still silent behind his attorney.

  47. FinFan68 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:35 AM

    1) It has not been overlooked. Most of the stories about this saga have mentioned it. That is the main reason Incognito was suspended by the team.

    2) The word itself is not offensive. The meaning behind it when it is used is what is offensive. That’s why it seems OK when black people use it or when it is used in music. Here is the real issue when it comes to that word. People assign their own meaning to it depending on who is using it. Sometimes context matters but not if it is a white person using it. That may be the reality of it but that in and of itself is racist. People are assigning different meanings (actually opposite meanings) to the same word based solely on the race of the person using it. If a black person uses that word it is viewed as a term of camaraderie; if a white person uses it in the exact same way (even with the exact same intent) it is viewed as racist. The word is not the problem…we are.

  48. dadawg77 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:36 AM

    How is it being overlooked? Because Glazer gave a softball interview to someone he knows and likes? Because every where else I have seen it reported and talked about. His usage of the word may have not received focus as Cooper’s usage did just because of all the other messed up thoughts contained in the voice mail.

  49. teambringitstrong says: Nov 11, 2013 11:39 AM

    The reason is it wasn’t overlooked, it was simply ignored!! And why? Because every single time a minority brings up an issue, the White establishment blows it off by heaping insults like,’you’re blowing this out of proportion”, ” I’m not racist’, or the ‘catch-all’ ‘Quit playing the race card”.

  50. pfic15 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:44 AM

    How about its because we are assaulted with the word everyday from the subculture of America. Educated folks don’t use the word. Its not special. Its just a word. Kill it for one…kill it for all.

  51. jc327 says: Nov 11, 2013 11:46 AM

    I think at this point most objective people know that while use of the word is taboo, by all accounts Incognito did not mean it in a truly racist manner. That’s not the issue, unless you’re the typical small-minded American.

    The issue is overall locker room conduct and harassment.

  52. ufanforreal says: Nov 11, 2013 11:47 AM

    The “N” word.
    If there was a true effort for this to stop then why is it a common word of speech in the Rap songs and the blacks today. Please don’t use “well it’s the blacks saying it”, BS, if it is wrong then it is wrong period.

  53. aldavis4president says: Nov 11, 2013 11:48 AM

    teambringitstrong says: Nov 11, 2013 11:39 AM

    The reason is it wasn’t overlooked, it was simply ignored!! And why? Because every single time a minority brings up an issue, the White establishment blows it off by heaping insults like,’you’re blowing this out of proportion”, ” I’m not racist’, or the ‘catch-all’ ‘Quit playing the race card

    Couldn’t agree with you more. Anytime a minority is offended with racial slurs or any type of racist attacks, the white man trys and SUCCEEDS in just sweeping it under the rug and telling the minority to get over it. Just like the riley cooper. All I read all over this website was a bunch of uneducated Caucasians telling everyone to get over it they say it too why can’t we wahh wahhh” you can’t sayit for OBVIOUS HISTORICAL REASONS!! the ones who say that sound like little 6yr old kids. Have some respect, some decency.

  54. clarencewhorley says: Nov 11, 2013 11:51 AM

    The press is bringing this up because they staked out a position that Incognito is a racist and Martin is a victim.

    It appears Martin got benched for poor play, is mentally weak and checked himself into a mental hospital. Instead of looking at the situation the press went with the Incognito is a racist bully angle.

    Sheftner admitted today he did not hear the entire voicemail, but I think he probably heard it but that last sentence (‘call me back buddy”) didn’t fit into the narrative that Martin should be afraid for his life.

    Reminds me of when the new organization of this site selectively edited the Zimmerman 911 call to make it sound like he was a racist.

  55. shlort says: Nov 11, 2013 11:51 AM

    I think Marshal Faulk hit the nail on the head when he said the word is unacceptable regardless of whose mouth it comes out of. Michael Irvin agreed.

    They layed down a challenge to everyone in the African American community to not use the word.

    Thier point is a valid one. If people see other people using a word, they may not realize that it is unacceptable for some to use it, while it is accepted among others. They said no one should use it, ever.

    In my opinion, the use of racial slurs by an individual indicates that the person using it (black, white or other) notes a difference among human beings. I don’t use the word because I look at people as people and believe the only thing that should be used to judge and individual is how they are as a human being. Not to sound cliche, but MLK had it right. The content of a persons character is more important than the color of their skin.

    In looking at Incognito, I truly believe that he lacks the common sense to realize what he did and said was wrong. He may be apologetic about the situation, but he is only that way because someone told him to be. He doesn’t really know why. Lets face it, intelligence and common sense go hand in hand. The average NFL player is not all that bright.

  56. easyeddie says: Nov 11, 2013 11:54 AM

    tundratommy says:
    Nov 11, 2013 10:28 AM
    To a larger degree, why does the racial element of the music industry’s lyrics continue to get overlooked?
    ————————-

    Answer: $$$

  57. 1rockyracoon says: Nov 11, 2013 11:58 AM

    Sharpe was right on with his comments. We can debate the use of the n-word when it’s used by African Americans in conversation or rap songs. However, it will never be ok for Incognito to use it in his conversations. What low level of self respect do the dolphins players have to allow him to use that word?

  58. ProDolphinsTalk says: Nov 11, 2013 12:05 PM

    Rob Parker is flabbergasted…

  59. wiseone50 says: Nov 11, 2013 12:08 PM

    When this first came out I was horrified by what I heard. After hearing the other side, now I think Martin should have had a talk with Incognito first and if that didn’t work- go to the coach. A REAL man would try to settle it in house first. I have been called “white boy”, “cracker” etc by black people in the hood and I didn’t go crying to my mommy at home about it. I just dealt with it like a man.

    By the way, remember when that wimp Tom Jackson and that wuss Chris Berman called Rush Limbaugh a racist when he was simply pointing out what he thought was a racial bias in the media and it was NOT a racist comment at all. They obviously drummed him out because they don’t like his politics. That, or they’re to stupid to know the difference. I didn’t agree with Limbaughs analysis but it was NOT a racist comment. Get over you’re sensitivity you wimps.

  60. phinatic29 says: Nov 11, 2013 12:10 PM

    It didn’t get overlooked – this is only about the 60th article i have read about it.

    But here is the thing, if the black guys in the locker room, that know Incognito personally, if they we’re not offended by it, who am I to tell them they are wrong?

  61. doctorrustbelt says: Nov 11, 2013 12:24 PM

    Yeah… a real man would try to sit the bully down and reason with him…. because …. everyone knows bullies respond best to reasonable conversations.

  62. cuda1234 says: Nov 11, 2013 12:29 PM

    So both Sharpe and Ward are both advocating for separate but equal rules for blacks and whites? Is that just in language or does it apply to restrooms, waterfountains and restaurants, too?

  63. smackingfools says: Nov 11, 2013 12:46 PM

    If the word I so offensive to them maybe it’s time for NOBODY to say it. If the word offends you then you shouldn’t be using it. And that’s for any race.

  64. ialwayswantedtobeabanker says: Nov 11, 2013 12:47 PM

    Here’s why it got “overlooked.” Incognito may be a bit edgy, but he never intended them in the sense the n-word is customarily associated. His intent was not racist-driven.

    How many times have you called a good friend on the phone, sent a text, shot off an e-mail – and started with “How’s it goin’ assface?” “What’s up you miserable sonofab*tch?” “What are you lookin’ at, you rotten bastard mutant?”

    In all those cases, you’re not REALLY saying someone is any of those things. It’s just playful banter. The people who attach way too much meaning without considering context – really miss the mark.

    Is Incognito a saint? Absolutely not. I just don’t think he meant to burn the n-word with the intent that makes that word so vile. And I further think those closest to him “get it,” – and many of those who are least closest to him and writing about it, don’t.

  65. theanswer0381 says: Nov 11, 2013 12:49 PM

    bc when black people use the word more than white ppl it loses all its stigma. whites, blacks, hispanics all use this word soo much and the “well we say it with an a” argument is so stupid and people are realizing if blacks can say it than so can everyone else.

  66. scyankee9999 says: Nov 11, 2013 12:57 PM

    How is it being overlooked? Do you think for one minute that he would have been suspended for saying he was going to slap anyone? The only reason that RI was suspended was because he used the N word! JM claims that he has other texts and voicemails. Why was this the first one released? Because it provided the drama needed for JM what he wanted and that was released from the team that demoted him back to RT and where fans didn’t respect him. I’m willing to bet he goes on to play for another team and quits football a few years later claiming emotional issues.
    For all those ppl who say where we’re the coaches. Did you forget the fact that this is a voice mail left on a phone. If the two players appeared to be close as everyone in the locker room has stated why would the coaching staff assume there was an issue.
    Let’s move in now. Both players will be playing football next year.

  67. ccombs2 says: Nov 11, 2013 12:58 PM

    Incognito is an ass and the use of the word ill advise but there is something to be said about the fact that the “black players” in the locker room allowed a “white player” to use a word they use so freely. Are they actually the ones seeing past race?

    I think it is idiotic for either group.

    Not excusing anything just a question.

  68. tfaulk says: Nov 11, 2013 1:03 PM

    I’ve already expressed the view that it has not been overlooked, but I think it worth pointing out: the exact reverse of this actually appears to be the case.

    The Riley Cooper got a little press, a little commentary, and then it was simply forgotten, he was accepted back, and started to perform well.

    Whereas gallons of ink and lots of hot air have been expelled re: Richie. We didn’t see remotely the flair up in Philly as we see with this case. Riley was not suspended for conduct detrimental to the team, there was virtually no talk of racism in the NFL in general at all.

  69. thejuddstir says: Nov 11, 2013 1:11 PM

    …..” this is alleged, that some black players said Richie Incognito was an honorary black. There is no such thing……” sounds to me like Sharpe is a racist himself. I wonder how many people it took to write Sharpe’s comments out for him because he certainly isn’t capable of being “eloquent? Have you ever listened to his almost incoherent ramblings? Also, I agree with a previous poster who commented that the regular and casual use of the N word in NFL locker rooms is perhaps evidence that NFL players can “see past race”, unlike the progressives who feel the need to cleanse their guilty consciences. Also, I rarely use the N word and when I do, it is never said in a mean spirited manner, it is how my black friends prefer. I will 100% quit using the word when black people themselves quit using it. Blacks have no such thing as exclusive rights to the word, if they so hate the term and what they claim it represents then they sure as hell shouldn’t be using it to describe each other.

  70. Deb says: Nov 11, 2013 1:19 PM

    As Sharpe said, the argument has been put forward that Incognito was viewed as an “honorary” black among his African-American teammates, and therefore was given a pass to use the n-word. The larger discussion, then, is why anyone of any race is using such heinous language.

    I listened to an interview with African Americans who played during the 70s and said that term was not commonly used among blacks in the locker room back then. Nor did women routinely refer to one another as the b-word 20 years ago. Maybe the lines wouldn’t get so blurred if we stopped using these vile terms on ourselves.

  71. agc99 says: Nov 11, 2013 1:31 PM

    I actually agree with Shannon Sharpe. That’s a first.

  72. jonevans83 says: Nov 11, 2013 1:41 PM

    Again, so… if I write a caption on a picture and create a “meme” I am resolved of all guilt? lol. I’ll just make sure to keep all my threats in meme form so I can’t get in trouble.

  73. provguard says: Nov 11, 2013 1:50 PM

    I noticed that NBC Sports just had to get their dig in on the “Redskins”.

    The problem with the “N” word in a locker room of 70 to 80 percent black, they call each other the “N” word anyway…. Sounds to me like they desensitized it long ago.

  74. queeflatifah says: Nov 11, 2013 1:52 PM

    It hasn’t been “overlooked”, it’s just that’s the media chose to play up the bullying aspect of the story more. Had the media just played up incognitos words, then everyone would be crying about racial issues.

  75. fargovikesfan says: Nov 11, 2013 2:26 PM

    if this is truly a case of bullying, that’s one thing. But if this is going to be turned into another race baiting, “I can say it but you can’t”, politically correct BS thing than just shut the hell up with it. Words are words, many can be used in both negative and “terms of endearment” context. most of the “curse words” are used in that way, Too often people are just too over-sensitive to something and want to play the victim. Everyone knows Incognitio can be a jerk and his attitude has caused him to wear out his welcome with more than one team, and if he was indeed bullying Martin, then something needs to be done. if it turns out that it was nothing more than Martin getting his feelings hurt, then maybe he needs to look for another line of work.

  76. ivanpavlov0000 says: Nov 11, 2013 2:32 PM

    If Philbin was a decent coach, there wouldn’t be any races in that locker room. Players would all be the same color: Aqua Green.

    Lombardi didn’t tolerate this stuff. Walsh didn’t tolerate this stuff. But what would those guys know about being Champions?

  77. fargovikesfan says: Nov 11, 2013 2:36 PM

    if anything is racist in here maybe its Incognito being called an “honorary black man”. if a black person was bestowed the title of “honorary white guy”, he’d be ridiculed as an “Uncle Tom” or “Cornball Brother” or something of that nature. Double standards all around, pick and choose which ones offend you and whine your asses off about them, but the ones you consider ok don’t worry about.

  78. GBwomenrhot says: Nov 11, 2013 2:51 PM

    I’m White, and never in a million years will I know what it’s like to live in this racist society as a Black or Hispanic…..anyone who says they do are either lying or stupid.

  79. historygeek6 says: Nov 11, 2013 3:21 PM

    That makes you humble!

    Which, in turn, makes you an extreme freak of nature here!!!

  80. marima07 says: Nov 11, 2013 3:23 PM

    Romeo Crennel had it right when he was head coach of the Browns, banning the word altogether from his locker room.

    Just as little kids tend to repeat a slipped swear word from a parent’s mouth, if the N word is repeated enough in a locker room – through music or the lips of teammates, it will become ‘normalized’ in that situation.

    A few years ago Terrell Suggs was upset that an official [African American] referred to him as ‘boy’ during a game. But if you listen to Suggs mic’d up, he calls every one of his teammates ‘boy’.

    Players should look at their own words and behavior before pointing the finger and getting all offended at someone else saying something they don’t like.

  81. primemover1 says: Nov 11, 2013 5:09 PM

    Riley Cooper used the word in anger as a contemptuous term. Incognito used it in jest as an inclusive term. He should have known better, regardless of whether teammates were tolerant of him using it or not. However, the context and intent is the difference and it is huge.

  82. TheWizard says: Nov 11, 2013 6:57 PM

    More intelligent thought here in these posts than I’ve heard in most of the media.

  83. smillr58 says: Nov 11, 2013 7:23 PM

    I am so sick of how the media jumped the gun and now has to continue to press it… So sick of it all, all the talking heads out there blah blah blah blah.

  84. bobnelsonjr says: Nov 11, 2013 8:09 PM

    I think it is racist that blacks can use a word as part of their vocabulary but it is illegal to permit a white guy to use the same word in his vocabulary.

    “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.”
    -William Shakespeare

  85. sandy102270 says: Nov 12, 2013 2:07 AM

    “But the use of the racial slur by Incognito — at a time when there’s increasing debate over whether “Redskins” is a racial slur — somehow has been disregarded by folks who are instead arguing over minutiae like whether Martin’s “I will murder your whole f–king family” text message to Incognito shows that Martin was a participant in the rough-and-tumble locker-room banter when Martin simply was forwarding an Internet meme to Incognito and not actually typing the words with his fingers and thumbs.”

    This may be the most out of touch take on the whole issue to date.

    You can’t trivialize a veiled threat as insignificant because it was sent as an internet meme, when on every page you have a link to a “Days without an Arrest” tracker, especially when guys who have been accused of and/or convicted of serious, violent crimes have been brought back into and embraced by the league.

    The idea that you disregard a threat of violence–whether real or perceived–as a lesser offense than the use of a racial slur because of the way it was delivered shows that this is more about political sensationalism and less about actual fact.

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