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Brett Favre on Incognito-Martin: That’s just an NFL locker room

File photo of Brett Favre in New Orleans Reuters

When Brett Favre first heard that the NFL had a bullying scandal, he at first couldn’t comprehend it.

Favre said in an interview on Today that he didn’t understand how the word “bully” could be used to describe Dolphins offensive lineman Richie Incognito’s relationship with teammate Jonathan Martin.

“My initial reaction was, You’ve got to be kidding me. What? Pro football bullying? We’re playing the toughest sport, most violent, not to mention you’re men, some older than others, so it’s not like a little 12-year-old on the playground,” Favre said. “I’m not defending or condoning, all I’m saying is my initial reaction was, ‘A grown man who’s 320 pounds is getting bullied?'”

Favre said he doesn’t know the details of what has happened in Miami, but he was surprised to see it become an issue.

“I never thought I would see it,” Favre said. “I’m not saying it’s not possible, I’m not saying it didn’t happen. I don’t know. I haven’t really paid a whole lot of attention to it. But my initial reaction was, You’ve got to be kidding me.”

According to Favre, the culture of an NFL locker room is one where people expect to see teammates making crude jokes at other teammates’ expense. Favre was known as a locker room prankster during his time in the NFL, and he was also fined $50,000 by the NFL for failing to cooperate with an investigation into accusations that he sent inappropriate text messages and photographs to a woman who worked for the Jets while he was their quarterback.

“It is part of the locker room,” Favre said, “There’s a lot of guys getting picked on, some handle it well some don’t handle it well. I’m not saying it’s right. And from a locker room sense, from a team sense, I’m not saying it’s wrong. It’s just the way it is.”

Favre currently works as a high school football coach, and he said bullying isn’t tolerated at his school. Whether it’s a normal part of an NFL locker room right now or not, Incognito’s suspension makes it clear that bullying won’t be tolerated in the NFL for much longer.

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116 Responses to “Brett Favre on Incognito-Martin: That’s just an NFL locker room”
  1. rpiotr01 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:20 AM

    There are many things going on with the modern NFL that older players will never comprehend. Different game, different league, different time.

  2. dietrich43 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:21 AM

    I do agree with him about bullying in the NFL. However, if you replace bullying with “harassment of a coworker”, it’s potentially a bigger issue – at least from a legal standpoint. And expect the NFL to react in such a fashion to protect itself from possible lawsuits. That’s what happens when lawyers run things.

  3. alphaq2 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:24 AM

    I’m glad Brett said it. The use of the word “bully” in conjunction with grown men is beyond silly. So Incognito is a “bully” and Martin is a “tattle tale”. See how ridiculous that sounds? Grow up people.

  4. deckardesmodromic says: Nov 18, 2013 11:24 AM

    “I haven’t really paid a whole lot of attention to it.”

    Yet he has an opinion on it. And we wonder what is wrong with America.

  5. meatsweat says: Nov 18, 2013 11:24 AM

    First Favre article where I liked his statements in about 10years…

  6. abusementland says: Nov 18, 2013 11:24 AM

    I thought Brett had memory loss due to concussions? Seems to recall these juvinile lockerroom antics pretty easily…..

  7. sanduskyshowerspecial says: Nov 18, 2013 11:26 AM

    Spot on Brett, couldn’t agree more.

  8. 87hollywoodhorn says: Nov 18, 2013 11:26 AM

    what favre doesnt get is that today the nfl is full of a buncha overgrown manchildren who cant keep their affairs internal

  9. ProFootballTalkSucks says: Nov 18, 2013 11:26 AM

    Favre was never the brightest guy in the world. If you’re dumbfounded by large men being bullied you’re kind of an idiot. Bullying is almost never physical.

  10. freebrah says: Nov 18, 2013 11:26 AM

    This is PROFESSIONAL football.

    Nothing professional about harassing and intimidating your coworkers and colleagues.

    At no other company/industry in the United States would behavior like that be considered acceptable.

    The players are being highly compensated to be professional, and that doesn’t mean just playing at a high talent level, that means acting like a professional in every possible facet.

  11. granadafan says: Nov 18, 2013 11:26 AM

    Two 300 plus pound men throwing blows would cause a lot of damage. This isn’t the playground anymore with kids or teenagers. It takes a bigger and more MATURE man to walk away without resorting to violence.

  12. 6ball says: Nov 18, 2013 11:27 AM

    .

    ” I’m not saying it’s right. It’s just the way it is”

    Brett, that statement also works when discussing slavery, genocide, and religious intolerance.

    .

  13. rodh32340 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:27 AM

    Man to man, all things being equal, a little cajoling, kibbitzing, horsing around in the lockerroom is expected, I would worry about morale if there was none. However, when the verbal abuse and threats are initiated by a member of the Coaching staff and directed at one individual who is being singled out by the coach for another player to do the hazing, this is wrong and shows an incapability of leading men individually and more so as a cohesive unit.

  14. nfl4days says: Nov 18, 2013 11:28 AM

    This isn’t going to help the NFL’s image at all. This is painting an NFL locker room as a bunch of immature meat heads. The NFL loves to throw around the word “professional” but this seems like anything but. This is the type of stuff I would expect from high school kids, not grown men with families.

  15. packattack1967 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:30 AM

    Until i hear something more, Im with Brett. As I see it, Martin’s the guy that needs help.

  16. justchuckn says: Nov 18, 2013 11:31 AM

    Is Brett Favre really the best player to talk about incriminating text messages?

  17. notoriousjebus says: Nov 18, 2013 11:33 AM

    I can’t believe I am going to say this, but Favre is 100% right. This whole notion of adult on adult bullying is asinine, especially in the case of football players.

    You are trying to tell me that a guy who’s job consists of getting/giving maulings to another man for 3 hours every Sunday is capable of being bullied?

    Now if it was a lineman picking on a kicker or punter I might be able to see it, but this whole notion of adult bullying is laughable. The only thing that’s more ridiculous is the way that the media and NFl has bought into all this. I mean traditional news outlets are covering this and asking if the NFL has a problems with bullying. What’s next, maybe the UFC finds out GSP is picking on other fighters?

  18. flaccodelic says: Nov 18, 2013 11:35 AM

    Then again, Brett thinks sending pictures of his junk to much younger women is A-OK too, so he may not be the very best moral compass the NFL has to offer.

  19. TheRealLogicalVoice says: Nov 18, 2013 11:39 AM

    Well said Brett!! Yet another player on Incognito’s side which probably makes it 15,000 against 5 now. 3 being Martin and his parents and 2 being his lawyers.

  20. noahbird says: Nov 18, 2013 11:40 AM

    Just because you’re a millionaire pro athlete or businessman doesn’t mean you have clue what the words coming out of your mouth mean or how they came into existence.

  21. loc0brown says: Nov 18, 2013 11:43 AM

    The NFL = Dazed and Confused. Was it really like in high school in Texas?

  22. scrp2 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:45 AM

    Brett bullied the Vikings into paying him 20 million his final year.

  23. cospgsmadman says: Nov 18, 2013 11:47 AM

    Thanks Brett for telling it like it is. The word bullying is a way to get headlines. If Martin would have stood up for himself nobody would have heard of all this mess

  24. newjerseygiants says: Nov 18, 2013 11:48 AM

    Favre is dead on. Way back in the early 80’s I played minor league baseball for a couple years and even then, with mostly younger guys in their late teens and early 20’s, the locker rooms could get brutal, and yes, there usually was one or two guys who got picked on more often than others. But that’s just the way it is.

    If you want to play in a big boy league, you had better wear your big boy pants.

  25. farvite says: Nov 18, 2013 11:50 AM

    Most overblown story in years.

    Martin doesn’t want to be an NFL player.

    Let him have his day in court. Leave the game in the hands of men who want to be a part of it.

  26. ma5terbla5t3r says: Nov 18, 2013 11:50 AM

    Maybe he’s forgetting that no one cares what he thinks anymore. Thank you, Corey Wootton.

  27. kingbeej says: Nov 18, 2013 11:53 AM

    It doesn’t matter if it’s typical in an NFL locker room. This type of behavior has no place in any workplace. Can you imagine if women were routinely groped in a given industry? Would it be an acceptable defense for an ex-banker to say “Ah, that’s just the banking industry. People grope women in the banking industry. It’s not harassment, it’s just team-building!”

    Peoples’ heads would explode, and rightfully so. Same thing here. It’s not an acceptable culture. If this is the culture, it needs to be purged, and started fresh.

  28. lightcleric says: Nov 18, 2013 11:55 AM

    I was bullied as a kid and it’s a serious issue. Bullying is a kid getting beat up/made fun of by someone bigger, strong and/or older than him and he’s helpless to stop it and too scared to tell a teacher because of further retribution.

    Saying a 25 year old 6’5″, 312 lb man got “bullied” by a 6’3″, 319 lb guy is insults my intelligence. Martin may very well have serious mental issues and Incognito…well, we already knew he was a clown, but this is not bullying.

  29. jamaltimore says: Nov 18, 2013 11:56 AM

    Hey Desk jockeys and normal working stiffs. stop with the workplace harassment issues and go back to the water cooler. The NFL is a vicious SPORT played by people who are nothing like you and some of the things they do should be left alone. Brett Favre is 100% correct.

  30. seatownballers says: Nov 18, 2013 11:58 AM

    This is funny to everyone now. It’s a lawsuit set in stone. He worked the system because he hates his teammates and and their reaction to his poor effort.
    He’ll get millions because he’s proving that Miami willingly provided a threatening workplace.

  31. ronin36 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:59 AM

    I don’t disagree with Brett’s statements..

    On the surface, it seems rediculous. But as we hear some details, it appears Icognito stepped over the line.

    I’ll throw one more thing into the mix. Martin has played football at Pee-wee, highschool, and college levels. He should know, seen, and experienced “joking around.”

    If he got fed up with it, in his mind, it went over the line.

    Just sayin’

  32. mogogo1 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:05 PM

    The more you hear about it, the more it sounds less like bullying and more like somebody just being stuck in an environment outside their comfort zone.

    Make Martin work on an oil rig or as a dockworker and he’d have had the same complaints. He grew up with a silver spoon attending private schools. He’d never encountered blue-collar types in his life and once he hit an NFL locker room filled with rough guys from tough backgrounds he couldn’t fit in.

  33. rolltide510 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:09 PM

    I’ve had a few 180’s on my thoughts on this subject already, but presented in terms like this I’m starting to agree with the Farvian conventional wisdom that 6’5 310+ lb offensive tackles playing professional football shouldn’t be able to be “bullied”.

    If its the case, the people who evaluated Martin as a second round draft choice seriously failed at due diligence. It’s not just that he’s playing pro football, he’s playing a position where “mean streak” is listed as a prerequisite.

  34. blueberrymuffin11 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:13 PM

    Perhaps if Favre doesn’t know the details and hasn’t paid much attention, he should refrain from commenting? Just sayin.

  35. vusnu says: Nov 18, 2013 12:16 PM

    Even if Brett is right, doesn’t change the fact that Jeff Ireland is a jackass and should be canned.

  36. wolfiereasonedlife says: Nov 18, 2013 12:16 PM

    deckardesmodromic says: Nov 18, 2013 11:24 AM

    “I haven’t really paid a whole lot of attention to it.”

    Yet he has an opinion on it. And we wonder what is wrong with America.
    ________________________________
    I was going to say the same thing and was absolutely shocked at the negative response this comment received. Is intellectual curiosity not a prerequisite before taking a stand on an issue?

  37. ruvelligwebuike says: Nov 18, 2013 12:17 PM

    The part of the equation that the “harrassment” and “professional” folks don’t understand is that professional behavior is not the same in each profession.

    The analytical civil engineer would not fit in well with the fast-paced culture of a Wall Street day trader. The director of “The National Helpline for Witnesses of Child Discipline” would have a hard time with the culture of contractors on a building site.

    If Martin doesn’t fit in to the culture in that locker room, he needs to do something about it. “I tried to make friends and they didn’t want to be my friend so I left” does not cut it. At least it didn’t, until the wacko lefties got control of the the government and the media.

  38. mogogo1 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:20 PM

    blueberrymuffin11 says:

    Perhaps if Favre doesn’t know the details and hasn’t paid much attention, he should refrain from commenting? Just sayin.
    _____________

    Flip side to that coin is Favre spent 20 years in NFL locker rooms playing for 4 separate organizations and obviously never saw an offensive lineman “bullied.” That’s pretty relevant to the discussion.

  39. masimelton says: Nov 18, 2013 12:20 PM

    The NFL is a prison culture where everyone gets paid in legitimate ways (although that can be up for debate). Many of these so-called professionals come from background and neighborhoods where narcissism and engaging in anti-social behavior takes place most often than not. We expect them to change and become better people once they make millions of dollars playing professional sports, but this is the primary reason why they don’t. Being able to acquire large sums of money and put n a show for large audiences fuels their inappropriate and dysfunctional behavior. We as Americans spend entirely too much time rewarding bad behavior for personal gain. The NFL isn’t doing any better to eliminate this element and types of people from it’s sports.

  40. chillyball says: Nov 18, 2013 12:21 PM

    Greatest all time.

    Favre > Rodgers

  41. wolfiereasonedlife says: Nov 18, 2013 12:24 PM

    newjerseygiants says: Nov 18, 2013 11:48 AM

    Favre is dead on. Way back in the early 80′s I played minor league baseball for a couple years and even then, with mostly younger guys in their late teens and early 20′s, the locker rooms could get brutal, and yes, there usually was one or two guys who got picked on more often than others. But that’s just the way it is.

    If you want to play in a big boy league, you had better wear your big boy pants.
    ____________________________________
    And this helped the team how? The, “because that’s the way it is” argument has never properly explained why it was ok to ostracize a teammate. Maybe some people just get-off being a predator in the locker room or in life but please explain how that ostracized team mate will then be motivated to play harder for the person that is tormenting him? When I hear a jock talk about the “culture” of the locker room it makes it really tough to watch sports.

  42. wolfiereasonedlife says: Nov 18, 2013 12:27 PM

    mogogo1 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:20 PM

    blueberrymuffin11 says:

    Perhaps if Favre doesn’t know the details and hasn’t paid much attention, he should refrain from commenting? Just sayin.
    _____________

    Flip side to that coin is Favre spent 20 years in NFL locker rooms playing for 4 separate organizations and obviously never saw an offensive lineman “bullied.” That’s pretty relevant to the discussion.
    _________________________________
    Or, Favre is/was part of the problem and was one of the guys doing the bullying, also relevant.

  43. dodohead418 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:28 PM

    Like it is just an NFL locker room when you flirt with a 26 year old when you are far older too, right?

  44. crik911 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:30 PM

    Ritchie is a bully, no place for it anywhere in life. He’s shown his poor qualities on and off the field.

  45. farvite says: Nov 18, 2013 12:31 PM

    masimelton,

    The NFL is in the football buisness. Self-improvement is an individual responsibility.

  46. therealtrenches says: Nov 18, 2013 12:33 PM

    It’s pretty easy to see what happened here:

    When the Dolphins worried that their starting left tackle was soft, they put Incognito on him like a buddy.

    Incognito regularly says wildly offensive things (as previous incidents suggest).

    Martin went along with it for a little while, for exactly the reason Favre states: that’s the way things are in locker rooms.

    But when Martin got that text, he decided enough was enough. He decided to take action. For a Stanford guy raised by two lawyers, that didn’t mean raising his fists, it meant going through the proper channels.

    The rest really doesn’t matter (especially what Favre says about all this0.

  47. stoopidfool says: Nov 18, 2013 12:35 PM

    pinky out everyone!!!

    it’s time for some football!!!

  48. isphet71 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:38 PM

    All the horrible things said in the locker room are half the reason to play organized sports! Hockey locker room is no different; we all have a great time saying horrible things before and after games. I would be sad if that had to change.

    Especially after a loss, it’s a great way to blow off steam before going back to the real world where you realize you can’t hit people without getting way more than a 2 minute timeout.

  49. jetsjetsjetsnow says: Nov 18, 2013 12:38 PM

    I think bullying is the wrong word to be promoting in this situation. This is about hazing crossing the line or workplace harrassment. Everyone can relate to and understand those contexts at a professional level as it’s pretty clear when they cross the line or get out of hand. Bullying is an adescent term & is being used to dramatise & sensationalize the situation. Lets be grown ups with our vocabulary people.

  50. jetsjetsjetsnow says: Nov 18, 2013 12:40 PM

    I think bullying is the wrong word to be promoting in this situation. This is about hazing crossing the line or workplace harrassment. Everyone can relate to and understand those contexts at a professional level as it’s pretty clear when they cross the line or get out of hand. Bullying is an adolesent term & is being used to dramatise & sensationalize the situation. Lets be grown ups with our vocabulary people.

  51. jonevans83 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:46 PM

    “therealtrenches says:
    Nov 18, 2013 12:33 PM

    But when Martin got that text, he decided enough was enough. He decided to take action. ”

    That text happened 7 months before he left the team. Martin sent similar txts to Incognito as well as over 1100 others back and forth. Your logic (and math) is flawed. Go back to school

  52. pemory says: Nov 18, 2013 12:49 PM

    This may be true; doesn’t make it right. How would he feel if his son we’re bullied and the bully’s dad told him: “it’s just boys being boys”?

  53. warrick79 says: Nov 18, 2013 12:52 PM

    freebrah says: Nov 18, 2013 11:26 AM

    This is PROFESSIONAL football.

    Nothing professional about harassing and intimidating your coworkers and colleagues.

    At no other company/industry in the United States would behavior like that be considered acceptable.

    The players are being highly compensated to be professional, and that doesn’t mean just playing at a high talent level, that means acting like a professional in every possible facet.

    Here’s the question though: Do we expect the players to act like football players or senators? You can’t have it both ways. Its the line of work they are in. Its a MANS job. I don’t hear anyone crying for reform in the military, or on a fishing vessel or in the trucking industry. Why? Because this kind of behavior comes with the job. If you want to be treated fairly, get a real job in the real world.
    In my opinion, there is a great injustice being done by the media on this one, calling this “bullying”. This is not even “hazing”, although you can call it that I guess. The most appropriate word for what Jonathan Martin is going through is an “initiation”. Look, I went through boot camp for 8 weeks and got what the media is being called in this instance “bullied” every day!!! It’s not bullying when EVERYONE has to do it, go though it, etc. We all went through it, and in this case, Jonathan Martin is no different. He was going through the boot camp of being a rookie in the NFL and couldn’t cut it, plain and simple. The military was the same way. You couldn’t cut it, you quit. Plain and simple. I saw it happen a dozen times going through boot camp. But ill tell you what, those were the guys I DIDN’T want next to me out in the field. The ones who broke mentally and couldn’t cut it. And guess what, the non hackers all went on to live their lives and find jobs that suited them better. Folks, that’s why these types of initiations are in place. To weed out the non hackers. The hazing/initiation period would have ended and Jonathan Martin soon would have been in the position Richie Incognito is now 4-5 years down the road; having the other rookies carry his pads, playing childish non malicious pranks on one another (read the article if you need more clarification on what I am talking about here) and then those rookies would be doing it…its a right of passage. Membership to this fraternity is earned, and Jonathan Martin failed boot camp horribly. Not everyone can be an astronaut and in this case that term applies to Jonathan Martin and being a football player.

  54. drelms says: Nov 18, 2013 12:54 PM

    I love the last line of this article, “Incognito’s suspension makes it clear that bullying won’t be allowed in the NFL.”
    Is this writer a clown or what, this was strictly a knee jerk reaction by the Dolphins owner trying to be politically correct.

    If all of the information had come out how Martin had texted similar words and messages to Incognito and that other team members had heard them laughing about it, Incognito would probably not been suspended.

    Now that more facts are being told public opinion has shifted dramatically.

    Bullying, what the heck does that have to do with some of the strongest and toughest men we supposedly have available in our Country. Guys playing through pain that some of us will never know, at least one guy continuing to play on a broken leg, and some writers want to use bullying? What a joke.

  55. chiadam says: Nov 18, 2013 12:57 PM

    He’s talking himself in circles. If they are men playing a manly game, then act like it. Men do not bully people. They grow up and behave with maturity and class. Just to be extra clear here, age and weight does not make you a man. Your behavior does.

  56. radrntn says: Nov 18, 2013 1:00 PM

    raider can plug incognito in there starting rotation today..please cut him…as far as Martin, he can develop his relationship with the Human Resources department of the NFL.

  57. dalvar1001 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:02 PM

    Amen. Man up have it out and move on.

  58. conormacleod says: Nov 18, 2013 1:05 PM

    Can I assume that most posters here would be ok with the fact if your son were “hazed” in their sport, or at school, by the veteran (older player)? Or is there a magic age to which being “hazed” is ok. Or is it ok for others to be hazed, but not your son, or yourself?

    BTW: the allegations are that Martin was forced to give $15k and had his family threatened. So, along those lines, I would assume a senior taking away money from your younger son and then threatening to hurt your daughter if your son didn’t comply would be ok with you? Correct?

    Please, help me to understand what most of you seem to be thinking is “ok” behavior. Is there a weight limit? 300 pounds excludes anybody from being harassed or threatened? I must know these things!!

  59. CKL says: Nov 18, 2013 1:07 PM

    kingbeej says:
    Nov 18, 2013 11:53 AM
    It doesn’t matter if it’s typical in an NFL locker room. This type of behavior has no place in any workplace. Can you imagine if women were routinely groped in a given industry? Would it be an acceptable defense for an ex-banker to say “Ah, that’s just the banking industry. People grope women in the banking industry. It’s not harassment, it’s just team-building!”

    Peoples’ heads would explode, and rightfully so. Same thing here. It’s not an acceptable culture. If this is the culture, it needs to be purged, and started fresh.
    _________________________________
    Oh for pete’s sakes…what overly sensitive glop! No one was groped against their will. Actions are much more impactful than words and there is no parallel here.

    I AM a woman and I worked in a 99% male testosterone laden type of environment (maintenance/cleaning department) within a straight laced industry (banking). To me all the BSing was a fun thing. We said stuff to each other we NEVER would have said to other people like our customers or people in the other departments. Now granted, I wouldn’t call a black person the N word…ever. But we had black dudes who called this one dude in landscaping “the little mexican” even though he wasn’t mexican, just because in our area a lot of landscapers were in fact mexicans. He didn’t love it but he didn’t really protest. To me, the line is crossed IF AND ONLY IF the person who hates the behavior tells the people who are acting that way that they hate the behavior and the behavior does not cease. Much like with concussions, this isn’t a unilateral responsibility and the “victims” should get off scot free for their part in the issue. They’re grown, act like it.

    Maybe Incognito crossed the line and Martin told him he hated it and he didn’t stop. And then Martin told his coaches and they too did nothing to stop it. If these things happened, Martin should pursue a harassment case and win. But my opinion is that Martin was planning SOMETHING all along, otherwise why save a voicemail and spring it on people as something that bothered you about 6 months after it was left for you?

  60. raideralex99 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:11 PM

    I would bet my last dollar if Incognito was African American this would NEVER have been a story.

  61. RE LEE says: Nov 18, 2013 1:11 PM

    It’s a general trend in our country nowadays… The promotion of victim mentality and the leveling of the playing field. You are not good enough because you are a victim of —– fill in the blanks…. Racism, bigotry, the wealthy etc. – even in the military. The stupid idea of changing the marine hats to be gender-neutral. Now bullying in the nfl. the nba is following suit. You can hardly move without creating yet another victim. When I first read about this incident my reaction is still the same as it is now…. HUH?

  62. moustachedone says: Nov 18, 2013 1:16 PM

    Brett Favre on Brett Favre: That’s just Brett Favre.

  63. kastout11 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:18 PM

    Initially, I felt the same way Favre did, but as we are seeing, Miami is going to pay a huge price for this. Although, I have no idea what to beliveve. Now, I am hearing Martin saying to Incognito, that it was not about him.

  64. ratsfoiledagain says: Nov 18, 2013 1:19 PM

    rpiotr01 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:20 AM

    There are many things going on with the modern NFL that older players will never comprehend. Different game, different league, different time.
    ———-
    Brett last played in 2010. That would make him a part of the ‘modern NFL.’

  65. woodyc says: Nov 18, 2013 1:20 PM

    I couldn’t agree with Favre more. We’re talking about a 6’5″ 320 lb man, in the NFL, not a 50 lb 8 year old on a playground. If you’re not a man that can stand up for yourself by the time you’ve made in to the NFL, then you’ve got to be kidding me! The best thing that can happen to America now is that we end this witch hurt for the “bully”, and start teaching kids to stand up for themselves again.

  66. tvguy22 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:20 PM

    Wait, Brett is coming back???

  67. conormacleod says: Nov 18, 2013 1:27 PM

    CKL says:
    Nov 18, 2013 1:07 PM
    To me, the line is crossed IF AND ONLY IF the person who hates the behavior tells the people who are acting that way that they hate the behavior and the behavior does not cease.
    ————————————–
    You’re all over the place in your post. You support the treatment. You’re against it. Comparing calling somebody “little Mexican” to calling a black man the N word. It’s ok, but not if it was reported.

    Last time I checked, Martin DID report it. And his bosses either ignored it, or told Incognito to beat it out of Martin (nobody has denied this accusation by Martin).

    I can sum up what most of you are thinking here…”It’s all Ok, because they’re big men, are rich, play football, and most importantly, because it isn’t happening to me”.

  68. annes22 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:29 PM

    Finally someone with a bit of brain has something to say. Favre has been in enough locker rooms, unlike all the press and tv guys who are inventing stuff, if they can’t find the truth.
    It’s gone on long enough now with the guess work,
    let’s move on.
    I am so “thrilled” to hear the investigator says the Dolphins are co-operating!!! What the hell does he think they are going to do, more stupidity here.
    Jonathon Martin is a “baby” and I will never think anything different.

  69. dragonfly99 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:29 PM

    This isn’t elementary school. These are large grown men. Jonathan Martin is never going to make lots of money playing professional football, but sees an opportunity to make millions with a potential lawsuit.

  70. dalvar1001 says: Nov 18, 2013 1:33 PM

    If Martin was my son my first question would be how bad does the bully look. The only way a bully wins is by not getting his ass kicked or at least know that there is a consequence for his actions. This is something that should have been learned in pre school….

  71. wnstonchill says: Nov 18, 2013 1:36 PM

    Just as the Redskins are a logo. Yet, we live in the age of “everyone’s offended by something”. As long as people have that victim/entitlement mentality, they won’t have to be concerned about the real principle here which is known as “accountability”!
    This is between Incognito & Martin, PERIOD!

  72. tipstopten says: Nov 18, 2013 1:44 PM

    Favre, you have had to many helmet hits.

  73. yyyass says: Nov 18, 2013 1:49 PM

    Lost in all the political correctness is that Martin lost his position when the Dolphins traded for McKinnie. Then suddenly Martin’s seriously afraid that Incognito is going to kill his family and eat his children? Yeah, right. He’s looking for a cash grab and a way to hurt the team for demoting him, and the dumba$$ Incognito was low-hanging fruit. That talk was just “banter” between a racial mix of guys who thought nothing of it until Martin suddenly got defensive and “fearful”. Incognito is a jerk, but this got blown out of proportion and taken WAY the hell out of context.

  74. frank booth says: Nov 18, 2013 1:53 PM

    “Bullying” is a bad description because it conjures up images of the “schoolyard bully” and people just think about simple physical confrontation. I don’t think what they are looking for in the Martin/Incognito affair are a couple of isolated incidents, which occur in any venue. I think what this whole issue is about is a systematic and ongoing targeted treatment of an individual.

    “Abusive behavior” would be a better connotation.

  75. CKL says: Nov 18, 2013 1:57 PM

    Nov 18, 2013 1:27 PM
    CKL says:
    Nov 18, 2013 1:07 PM
    To me, the line is crossed IF AND ONLY IF the person who hates the behavior tells the people who are acting that way that they hate the behavior and the behavior does not cease.
    ————————————–
    You’re all over the place in your post. You support the treatment. You’re against it. Comparing calling somebody “little Mexican” to calling a black man the N word. It’s ok, but not if it was reported.

    Last time I checked, Martin DID report it. And his bosses either ignored it, or told Incognito to beat it out of Martin (nobody has denied this accusation by Martin).

    I can sum up what most of you are thinking here…”It’s all Ok, because they’re big men, are rich, play football, and most importantly, because it isn’t happening to me”.
    _______________________________
    I’ve been sexually harassed before, but thanks for assuming. I also just simply put up with it because it was a short term job and the boss didn’t do anything to affect my actual employment status. I was 18 then, it’s amazing I was tougher mentally than a 20 something pro football player.

    Also I have not seen a single thing that confirmed that Martin reported any sort of harassment to anyone in a position to stop it. If you have, please provide a credible link and I will gladly concede that point.

    You’re the one who is “all over the place” if you think there’s no comparison with a black person using a racial term to belittle someone or joke with someone and someone using a racial term to belittle a black person or joke with them. It’s the same thing. It’s one thing that’s wrong with a good bit of society in this country: we think racism/racial slurs is a one way street, when it has many avenues and nuances. If there is a black person who does not mind his white friends calling him “N”? who am I to say they shouldn’t? NOT.MY.BUSINESS. If the non mexican guy didn’t feel he wanted to speak up if he hated being called “mexican” why is that my business to say he should? These are grown men, not children. Let’s stop acting like they are helpless kids who can’t speak up for themselves and worse yet, have NO OBLIGATION to speak up for themselves in order to show how they feel about something .

    If you do not tell people something bothers you and that they need to stop it, how are they supposed to know it really actually bothers you (and you’re not just playing along with any reactions) and you want them to stop it? I’m lost. No one should have to be a mind reader or else face criminal charges of workplace harassment and the potential end of their careers.

  76. kenstabler says: Nov 18, 2013 2:00 PM

    I have to agree with Farve on most of his comments, it seems really hard to envision a 320 pound man being bullied. The media invented the (bullying) media clip about Martin. Some type of mental abuse must have been used to make Martin to pay $15,000 in extortion money for his fellow linemen to go on a paid vacation to Vegas without him. However, I would think Martin is big enough and man enough to say no to such a ridiculous request, or go to management. But if undo force or coercion was used for monetary gain, that is extortion, not bullying.

    As with all things in the NFL anymore, this will come down to the lawyers. At least this won’t be handled by the competition committee, maybe.

  77. lunarpie says: Nov 18, 2013 2:00 PM

    From a Legend of the Game with RINGS.

    Whatever the media wants to puts its dirty hands on, it DESTROYS!!!!

    MARTIN is a CHUMP and Incognito is a DUMBASS!!!!

  78. coachgutz says: Nov 18, 2013 2:03 PM

    Why are you all still interviewing Brett Farve. His time is over, enough.

  79. gozorakgogo says: Nov 18, 2013 2:04 PM

    I find the fact that anyone who considers him or herself a fan of the game, as well as those who cover the game, would be upset, offended, or shocked by the Incognito/Martin affair laughable. Anyone with the slightest knowledge of the game, and Im not talking X’s and O’s, Im talking the culture and physical/emotional brutality of the game, is neither shocked nor offended or concerned. First we dont know all that there is to know and probably never will but there is nothing particularly unusual or shocking or disturbing about what we do know so far. An NFL locker room/playing field is NOT the same, not in the same world, as the normal workplace. The environment is not of the same world as the common workplace. The language, culture, behavior isnt the same as the common workplace. And anyone who believes that it should and that all professional football players should have to be just as professional, just as polite, just as respectful, just as “NICE” as the rest of us have to be in our workplaces is childish ignorance of both reality and human nature. Those of us in the common workplace do not face, endure, or experience the physical, emotional, mental brutality that NFL players do on a daily basis. None of us do. We expect them to be gladiators on the field but be polite, nice, sweet, good little boys off of the field. Total hypocrisy. And the fact that so many are so willing to conflate the silliest of things into the new media obsession of bullying is also laughable. Its quite clear which of you are unable to reason and rationalize for yourselves and instead wait for instructions from media in regards to what is right what is wrong, what is offensive, what demands an apology, what demands contrition. Too funny to me. The false outrage and phony concerns as well as the need by so many to be offended is pathetic and a sad commentary on this nation. That extends far beyond the world of sports.

  80. thejuddstir says: Nov 18, 2013 2:11 PM

    Common sense by Mr. Farve. I think Brett should be NFL Commissioner and judge/jury/executioner as it applies to meting out punishment. It doesn’t take an Einstein to see that the current NFL policy and procedures on any type of player punishment is nothing but a lark. When every player infraction of alcohol…..illegal drugs……PED’s, on field actions, etc. has it’s own separate policy that police’s it, how can you expect anything to change? when you get 10 strikes at each policy, then can appeal it until the cows come home and then ex-players like Hanks and Birk get to decide if the punishment fits, well hells bells you know who they are going to stick up for………..guess that’s why the chit continues.

  81. therealtrenches says: Nov 18, 2013 2:13 PM

    At jonevans83:

    First of all, calm down. Save your “go back to school” stuff for people younger than you.

    Second of all, do you have any idea what “going through the proper channels” means? It means being deliberate, consulting with people you respect, and then doing what you think you have to do.

    Third, I’m not taking sides; they both share blame. Martin’s texts prove that. In them He himself admits that “the locker room got to him.”

    Finally, your point doesn’t change the basic logic of my argument.

    Mark my words. When this investigation reveals everything, we’ll learn that Martin has been thinking about doing this for awhile.

    He comes from a family of lawyers. This didn’t happen over night.

  82. cjpom664 says: Nov 18, 2013 2:18 PM

    Just because he’s Brett Favre doesn’t mean his opinion is any more valuable than anyone else’s. This is a man who sent a picture of his wee wee to a reporter who clearly had no interest.

    The bottom line is, its PROFESSIONAL football. They’re expected to be professionals. If I went into work today and started harassing the new guy, I’d be fired in a heartbeat. There’s no place for this kind of stuff in any work place. And anyone who says differently, is an un-evolved meat head.

  83. krispc says: Nov 18, 2013 2:24 PM

    Here is the NFL’s nightmare scenario. What if he files a complaint to HR about harassment and the same laws kick in for him that kick in for everybody else employed in a “normal” workplace? Let’s see BOSS says toughen this dude up and you harass him and leave threatinging messages on phone, blackmail him into paying for food , doughnuts and trips to Vegas? You could say the NFL should be liable for an unsafe work environment.

  84. FinFan68 says: Nov 18, 2013 2:31 PM

    wolfiereasonedlife says:
    Nov 18, 2013 12:24 PM

    And this helped the team how? The, “because that’s the way it is” argument has never properly explained why it was ok to ostracize a teammate.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Why do you assume he actually WAS ostracized? He may have FELT that way but that is a problem with Martin, not the team. All the players’ comments indicate that there was no singling out of Martin. Martin himself took part in everything he has complained about. Jokes, threatening messages, racial angst…everything. It was fine (among their group/environment) until Martin quit and needed a reason that sounds better than “I’m just not good enough”. As sad as it seems, this entire saga came about simply because Jonathan Martin felt like a professional failure after he lost his starting job (and that wouldn’t be acceptable in a family full of Harvard professionals) so he (or his “camp”) decided to try to take down his employer, teammates and friends to avoid scrutiny and/or embarrassment.

  85. iltibido says: Nov 18, 2013 2:32 PM

    Who in their right mind didn’t think that a/any locker room is not full of “Meat Heads” and other types of silliness/rude behavior, needs to become part of the real world and leave your Utopian Fantasy……….

  86. jmh0702 says: Nov 18, 2013 2:44 PM

    Harassment (Bullying) is not restricted to office employees, factory workers or Boy Scouts. Nor is it restricted to 5’8″, 165 lb. men. Height and weight have no bearing.
    Imagine coming to work every day and having your peer group turn their back on you. Every day, every day, every day. Imagine coming into the cafeteria to join your office workers, and they get up and leave as soon as you approach the table. Every day, every day, every day. At what point do you finally have enough? Stop a second and think about where you work. What would you do? Every day, every day, every day. This has never ever been about football.

  87. conormacleod says: Nov 18, 2013 2:48 PM

    So, since this sort of thing has never happened in the NFL, are we to believe Martin is the one and only person in the history of the NFL that simply couldn’t handle the normal “hazing” that happens in NFL locker rooms? Is that what I should believe? Martin is the only guy, ever, that was just too sensitive to the normal shenanigans that happens every day?

  88. conormacleod says: Nov 18, 2013 2:49 PM

    It’s awesome that anonymous posters sitting at their computer think that Martin just needed to toughen up, but I have just one question…

    How come every single former NFL player that is a regular commentator on NFL pregame shows has come out against Incognito, and what apparently happened in Miami?

  89. beedubyatoo says: Nov 18, 2013 2:51 PM

    . The NFL loves to throw around the word “professional”
    —————————–
    Sorta like the NCAA referring to big time college athletes as “student athletes”.

  90. phillytj says: Nov 18, 2013 2:53 PM

    He’s been a dope at times but Favre’s outlook seems to mirror that of every NFL player (except Jon Martin).

    The word bullying is being thrown around too loosely with this case and in a context that likens it to and potentially diminishes actual childhood bullying. While these players may often act like children, two grown offensive lineman in an NFL locker room is not the same as kids on a playground and the word “bullying” should not be used to apply to both scenarios.

  91. conormacleod says: Nov 18, 2013 3:03 PM

    phillytj says:
    Nov 18, 2013 2:53 PM
    He’s been a dope at times but Favre’s outlook seems to mirror that of every NFL player (except Jon Martin).
    ———————————–
    Cris Carter. Shannon Sharpe. Tom Jackson. Keyshawn Johnson. Marshall Faulk. Michael Irvin.

    That is just a short list of guys that I saw and heard come out and say the behavior in the Dolphins locker room is NOT normal, and is absolutely appalling.

  92. conormacleod says: Nov 18, 2013 3:08 PM

    iltibido says:
    Nov 18, 2013 2:32 PM
    Who in their right mind didn’t think that a/any locker room is not full of “Meat Heads” and other types of silliness/rude behavior, needs to become part of the real world and leave your Utopian Fantasy……….
    ————————————-
    To be honest, I was not aware that it was normal to force teammates into paying $15,000 for a trip, and/or white guys calling teammates the N word, and/or guys threatening (Jokingly or not) to hurt teammates mothers was normal behavior.

    As I hear other NFL players state, the “hazing” mostly consisted of carrying shoulder pads, getting your head shaved, singing your college fight song, and buying donuts for team meetings.

  93. wydok says: Nov 18, 2013 3:09 PM

    That’s rich. This is coming from the guy sued for sexually harassing a Jets massage therapist. Like he has any idea what’s acceptable.

    How are you still married, Favre?

  94. localoutlaw says: Nov 18, 2013 3:15 PM

    Sorry, but I don’t understand how Brett can really comment on the locker room atmosphere…he had is own privat locker room on all 3 teams he was on…and allegedly would stay segregated from the other players…

  95. packerfan12 says: Nov 18, 2013 3:22 PM

    I see a lot in here that adults can’t be bullied….Why not? From reports Martin has allegedly been beaten up physically BY HIS OWN TEAMMATES, and has had to check himself into a mental hospital from harassment. So what exactly is the better term…”ABUSED”? “BEAT UP”? I don’t care how you say it, he was clearly in a bad situation, and when he sought help he found NONE. The fact that we care more about the word used to describe his situation more than his mental well-being is appalling. So…a group of guys beating someone up, and harassing him isn’t bullying? Then what is? Oh wait, there’s a certain age limit to bullying, I forgot. After 10 years old you have to call it harassment instead.

  96. jjackwagon says: Nov 18, 2013 3:26 PM

    Okay I am not buying the whole “bullying” concept for NFL locker rooms. Is this what we’ve become? A bunch of candy-asses?
    That said, if there was any sort of racist behaviour going on, why wasn’t it stopped long ago?

  97. krispc says: Nov 18, 2013 4:04 PM

    Make you wonder about the NFLPA(If they CONDON hazing they may well be targeted with a law suit). Everybody know the weakest excuse ever is “Well its always been done that way before”. As a parent I always hated well I did it because “Johnny” did it. What are we LEMMINGs? Wonder if there any Security cams in NFL locker rooms that contain the real story of what goes on there…

    This drove me nuts about this story overall: Everybody goes what has happened is terrible, and we are not saying Martin did anything wrong, but…. But = yes you broke the unwritten code of the NFL. Jeez sounds like baseball.

  98. phinfan says: Nov 18, 2013 4:18 PM

    This guy knows a thing or two about harrassing text messages..

  99. lawrinson20 says: Nov 18, 2013 4:27 PM

    Brett, despite being a quarterback, has never been known for his intelligence. His bulb is not bright.

    Even in this brief ‘story,’ there are inconsistencies and logic issues. None of this seems reasoned or thought out — not Brett’s premature and uninformed opinion, and not the rationale for making this a ‘story.’

  100. JSpicoli says: Nov 18, 2013 4:28 PM

    So now that we have given control of our league over to soccer moms, nerds and the gaze, its time to start a new league, like the one that destroyed itself.

  101. JSpicoli says: Nov 18, 2013 4:30 PM

    In 20 years all NFL fans will lactate from some sort of unknown osmosis.

  102. katra2logic says: Nov 18, 2013 4:40 PM

    …I’m not saying it’s wrong. It’s just the way it is.’

    Some say same thing about racism and discrimination.

    It is wrong and if we change now it won’t be ‘just the way it is’ anymore.

  103. tvjules says: Nov 18, 2013 4:49 PM

    Coming from the guy who takes pictures of his junk in the locker room, and sends it to a sports reporter…

  104. sactogary says: Nov 18, 2013 4:54 PM

    A lot of people’s perception is due to the use of the word “bullying.” Did Martin say “Richie’s a bully”? I doubt it.

    I can’t speak for others, but when I show up for work, I don’t want to take a lot of abusive crap from my co-workers. I might ignore it for a while, or I might even try playing along in hopes it would blow over. Depending on how crude and hostile the perps are, I may or may not confront them. If it doesn’t let up, eventually I’ll say “forget this” and go work somewhere else. NFL players don’t really have a comparable employer to go to.

  105. zerole00 says: Nov 18, 2013 5:04 PM

    So I realize Farve is from the deep south, but if racist death threats are part of the locker room – I think the NFL has a bigger problem at hand.

    Pranks are one thing, death threats are another.

  106. FinFan68 says: Nov 18, 2013 5:12 PM

    conormacleod says:
    Nov 18, 2013 2:49 PM
    It’s awesome that anonymous posters sitting at their computer think that Martin just needed to toughen up, but I have just one question…

    How come every single former NFL player that is a regular commentator on NFL pregame shows has come out against Incognito, and what apparently happened in Miami?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    It isn’t all of them. That is simply an exaggeration to make your point seem better than it really is. A couple of those same guys said they never witnessed any hazing at any level of competition. Ditka and one or two others have said things that would not seem to be on Martin’s side. That said, every one of these guys is paid by their respective networks and many of those networks have their own agendas.

    I don’t know if Martin needed to toughen up but he did need to stand up and say something while it was happening. Assuming his story is true, Martin waited for a small problem to become a crisis before he said anything to the Dolphins. That was done by his people AFTER Martin had already left.

  107. FinFan68 says: Nov 18, 2013 5:17 PM

    zerole00 says:
    Nov 18, 2013 5:04 PM
    So I realize Farve is from the deep south, but if racist death threats are part of the locker room – I think the NFL has a bigger problem at hand.

    Pranks are one thing, death threats are another
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    OK, based on that, why are Martin’s messages not treated the same way? Keep in mind that much of the reason Incognito’s VM is viewed so badly is because he has been labeled a “bully”. Apply that same criteria to Martin’s death threat message from a couple weeks ago, not 8 months ago like Incognito’s. That message was sent by a man that the media has claimed was so emotionally distraught from the bullying that he had to escape to a mental hospital. If he was that distraught over everything shouldn’t that mean that his threat should be taken much more seriously?

  108. jgedgar70 says: Nov 18, 2013 5:28 PM

    And we want Favre’s opinion on this….. WHY??????????????????

  109. imthaschmidt says: Nov 18, 2013 5:30 PM

    MArtin saw an opportunity and he took it. Why not sue the NFL for harrassment and probably get more money there than he would by playing and he gets to save his body while doing so. Sound like something someone from Stanford would do. Smart move by Martin.

  110. gmsingh123 says: Nov 18, 2013 6:20 PM

    Favre will change his mind about what he said very soon.

  111. miguel3557 says: Nov 18, 2013 6:36 PM

    The hick from Kiln, Mississippi is entitled to his opinion. But I’d suggest that it’s time for professional football to join the 21st Century. The locker room is part of a business that must follow the same rules about the treatment of employees as other businesses. Can any employer tolerate racist taunts and threats of killing directed at one employee by another? Clearly, the answer is no. Is there some special exemption for professional football players to act like nine year old boys without adult supervision? Again, the answer is no. Why do so many men who watch pro football favor the schoolyard bully rather than the extremely sensitive kid being bullied? Because they’re testosterone-driven macho idiots too.

    I say it’s long past due to lose the macho displays in the locker room and on the field. The penalty for taunting is an appropriate response to the macho displays that sully the idea of sportsmanship. I hope it’s extended to the macho talk by aggressive players before the ball is snapped. I’ve been watching pro football since 1954 and have never seen any useful purpose served by verbally demeaning your opponent either before or after a play. Really great players don’t woof and bark, they just play at a high level and go back to the huddle for the next play. Their level of play speaks for itself.

    It’s 2013, high time for every athlete to act like an adult, not a schoolyard bully.

  112. fdugrad says: Nov 18, 2013 8:06 PM

    masimelton: Absolutely spot on…nail RIGHT on the head.

  113. nonfiction2 says: Nov 18, 2013 11:19 PM

    Remember in the latter stages of Brett Favre’s career, he was hit like a piece of toilet paper and suffered many concussions. Obviously, it’s still affecting him or he showed how some rednecks from Mississippi really have no clue. Age nor size DOES NOT apply to bullying. Basically there are for kinds of bullying (Emotional, Verbal, Physical and Cyber). And this case most definitely falls into the category of bullying. It helps to be educated before opening your mouth.

  114. flash8910 says: Nov 19, 2013 1:25 PM

    I am pretty sure the dude that send pics of his junk to unsuspecting females should not be commenting.

  115. loveseatquarterback says: Nov 20, 2013 12:04 AM

    Martin got ostracized by his teammates because he failed to live up to their expectations. That is completely out of line. We should ostracize Incognito for failing to live up to our expectations.

  116. FinFan68 says: Nov 20, 2013 10:54 AM

    conormacleod says:
    Nov 18, 2013 1:27 PM

    Last time I checked, Martin DID report it. And his bosses either ignored it, or told Incognito to beat it out of Martin (nobody has denied this accusation by Martin).
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Well, then you need to check again. Martin did not report it to anybody (according to statements by those involved) until his agent called Ireland and the lawyers started leaking bits and pieces AFTER Martin already left the team. He never mentioned that anything bothered him to anyone. No teammate, no coach, no trainer was made aware of any problem. That’s why EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM were shocked when this caught fire in the media.

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