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NFL morning after: Bad rules a big problem for the NFL

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After Monday night’s mess in Carolina, where the game ended with a pass interference penalty in the end zone being picked up without explanation by the referee, I didn’t want to spend Sunday thinking about rules and referees. But it was hard not to think on Sunday that the NFL has a real problem on its hands with rules that are written badly, and officials who enforce those rules inconsistently.

Everyone likes to bash the referees when they get something wrong, and I’m going to criticize the referees here today, but it’s important to remember that the referees can only enforce the rules that the NFL gives them. And I’m starting to think that a bigger problem is that the NFL’s rules simply aren’t written clearly enough to allow the officials to do their jobs properly.

Here’s a sampling of my thoughts on the rules on Sunday:

I still don’t know what roughing the passer is. In the Buccaneers-Lions game, Detroit defensive tackle Nick Fairley hit Buccaneers quarterback Mike Glennon in the leg and was called for roughing the passer. According to the referee, it was because Fairley hit Glennon too low. But the problem is, Fairley’s hit on Glennon was in about the same part of the leg as Chargers defensive lineman Corey Liuget’s hit on Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning a couple weeks ago. Liuget wasn’t flagged and wasn’t fined and the NFL confirmed that Liuget’s hit was legal. But if Liuget’s hit was legal, I’m not sure why Fairley’s was illegal. And that wasn’t even the only roughing the passer call in that game I couldn’t figure out: Later in the same game, Tampa Bay’s Mark Barron was flagged for an even harder to understand roughing call against Detroit’s Matthew Stafford. And don’t get me started on Rams defensive tackle Michael Brockers‘ flag for a clean hit on Josh McCown.

Protecting quarterbacks is a priority, or is it? Last week, when 49ers linebacker Ahmad Brooks was flagged for a hit to the neck of Saints quarterback Drew Brees, the NFL said it was the right call, supposedly because protecting quarterbacks is a priority. So why wasn’t Pittsburgh’s William Gay flagged on Sunday for his hit to the head of Jason Campbell? In both cases, a defensive player went high and hit a quarterback who was still holding the ball, forcing a fumble. When it was Brees getting clotheslined, it was a flag. When it was Campbell getting knocked out of the game with a concussion, it wasn’t a flag? Why? As far as I can tell, the answer is that the rules about protecting quarterbacks aren’t written clearly enough for the referees to call them consistently.

Referees are out of position even when they’re in position. Miami’s Cameron Wake lowered his helmet and drilled Carolina’s Cam Newton in the chin, and Newton ended up spitting out blood. It was a clear penalty on Wake, but the referee didn’t throw the flag. Why? Former NFL head of officiating Mike Pereira said the ref was positioned exactly where he’s supposed to be, but just didn’t see it. But if that’s the case, the NFL needs to have an official positioned in a place where he will see a hit like that, or make hits to the head of quarterbacks reviewable on instant replay.

Coaches should be allowed to challenge personal fouls. Jets defensive end Muhammad Wilkerson was tripped and fell into Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco’s leg, triggering a flag for a personal foul. On replay, it was clear that Wilkerson only hit Flacco because he was tripped, but the referee can’t look at the replay to get the call right. Jets coach Rex Ryan should have been allowed to challenge, but under NFL rules, he couldn’t.

Coaches shouldn’t be allowed to delay games by throwing bogus challenge flags. As Detroit’s offense was lining up following a missed Tampa Bay field goal, Bucs coach Greg Schiano threw his red challenge flag. After a long delay in which Schiano and the referee conversed on the sideline, it was announced that Schiano had tried to challenge a call that wasn’t reviewable — namely, whether the Bucs’ kick had gone through the goalposts or over a goal post. Under NFL rules, it wasn’t a penalty for Schiano to throw that flag even when he couldn’t challenge. But it should be. Why should Schiano be allowed to delay the game and give his defense time to adjust to the way the Lions’ offense lined up? Later on Sunday afternoon, Giants coach Tom Coughlin did the same thing, throwing his red flag even though the play in question wasn’t reviewable. If a coach throws a challenge flag for something that can’t be challenged, he should be charged a timeout.

A huge missed call cost the Vikings, and the referee was powerless to review it. Packers linebacker A.J. Hawk blatantly grabbed and twisted Adrian Peterson’s facemask before forcing Peterson to fumble. It was an obvious penalty, and the officials should have seen it. But they missed it, and the referee couldn’t use replay to review it because for some odd reason facemasking isn’t subject to replay reviews. If we’re going to have instant replay at all, and if we’re going to have all turnovers automatically reviewed, why on earth can’t the referee look at the replay, see the blatant facemask, and get the call right?

No one knows what constitutes a catch. Late in the Cowboys’ win over the Giants, Dallas’s Dez Bryant grabbed a pass from Tony Romo, went to the ground and then lost possession. The officials ruled it incomplete, and I think the officials got it right. But the NFL’s convoluted rules about what constitutes a catch make it almost impossible for anyone to say with any confidence what will or will not be ruled a catch, and there were plenty of fans on Twitter saying they were sure Bryant had caught the pass. Cowboys coach Jason Garrett seemed to think it was a catch, too, as he called a timeout in the hopes that the extra time would trigger the replay assistant to tell the referee to review the play — which he didn’t do. The NFL simply has to do a better job of explaining what makes a catch and what makes an incompletion, so fans and coaches aren’t left confused at big moments in big games.

Forward progress isn’t clearly defined. The biggest play of the Giants-Cowboys game came when Giants receiver Victor Cruz caught a pass, was wrapped up by two Cowboys, then had the ball ripped out of his hands. The officials ruled it a fumble, and Dallas’s Jeff Heath picked it up and ran 50 yards for a touchdown. Giants coach Tom Coughlin said after the game that it was “unbelievable” that the officials didn’t rule Cruz’s forward progress had been stopped, but I can believe it because I see forward progress ruled inconsistently every week.

The NFL should eject players who enter the field during fights. When Rams defensive end Chris Long saw his brother, Bears guard Kyle Long, engaged in a skirmish on the field, Chris ran from the sideline onto the field to grab Kyle and pull him away. Chris may have simply been trying to break up the fight, but even if all they’re trying to do is break up a fight, players shouldn’t run onto the field and into a skirmish. One of the ugliest incidents in the history of American sports came in a 1977 NBA game, when Rudy Tomjanovich ran into a skirmish and Kermit Washington reacted by turning around and swinging, shattering bones in Tomjanovich’s face. The way to avoid such incidents is for all players to allow the officials to break up fights, not enter fights themselves. Other sports give automatic ejections to players who run from the sideline onto the field during a fight, and the NFL should, too.

I don’t like the overtime rule. Overtime in Green Bay felt unsatisfying all around. Here’s how I’d change the overtime rules: 1. Do away with the overtime kickoff. 2. Let the home team pick which yard line the first overtime possession will start on. 3. Let the road team pick whether to start on offense or defense, based on where the home team put the ball to start overtime. 4. Play pure sudden death, first team to score wins, and play until someone scores, with no ties.

NFL refs have a communication problem. The NFL admitted after last week’s Monday Night Football mess that referee Clete Blakeman dropped the ball when he failed to explain why a flag thrown on Carolina’s Luke Kuechly in the end zone was picked up, and the league office told refs last week that they need to use their microphones to explain to the fans why penalty flags get picked up. Amazingly, on Sunday against Miami, Kuechly committed another penalty on a pass into the end zone — and again, an official threw a flag, only to have the referee announce that there wouldn’t be a penalty, without explaining why. How does the NFL allow this to continue happening? The referees need to explain themselves. And the NFL needs to give the referees clearer rules to work with, so those explanations will make more sense.

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Bose renews deal with NFL, with extra exposure coming during replay reviews

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The NFL’s new replay system will give its official tablet provider greater exposure when the device is brought onto the field for the referee to consult with the league office. The NFL’s official headset provider will get a bump, too. And that provider presumably has agreed to pay plenty for that privilege.

The league announced on Tuesday that Bose has renewed its agreement to be the official headphone and headset provider of the NFL. “Headset” is the key, given the constant presence of “Bose” on the equipment worn throughout every game by the league’s 32 head coaches.

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

The twist comes this year when the referee will be wearing the Bose headset not when squirreled away in the sideline replay machine but in the field when the headset and tablet are brought to him from the sideline. The release from the NFL makes only passing reference to use of the Bose headsets for replay, but a league spokesman confirmed that the Bose headset will be used (in lieu of the earpiece through which the league office currently can talk to the referee) during replay reviews, adding value to the Bose partnership.

Bose acquired the sponsorship in 2014, after a 14-year deal with Motorola (believed to be worth $40 million per year in its final years) had expired. Motorola reportedly had offered $50 million per year to renew in 2013, but the league passed — spending a full year with simply the NFL logo on the headsets.

“Bose” will continue to be the name that millions see during NFL games, both on the sidelines and, starting this year, whenever a referee is hearing from the league office what the outcome of any replay reviews will be.

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Seahawks sign third-rounder Amara Darboh

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The Seahawks signed third-round pick Amara Darboh to his four-year rookie contract on Tuesday.

Darboh, one of four third-round picks by the Seahawks, became the seventh member of Seattle’s 11-man draft class to sign with the team. The Seahawks’ top four selections – defensive tackle Malik McDowell (second round), offensive lineman Ethan Pocic (second), cornerback Shaquill Griffin (third) and safety Delano Hill (third) remain unsigned.

Darboh was a second-team All-Big Ten selection during his senior season at Michigan. He led the team with 57 catches for 862 yards and seven touchdowns.

Darboh gives the Seahawks a bigger receiving option to complement Doug Baldwin and Tyler Lockett. If Darboh makes a strong push in training camp, he could push Jermaine Kearse for a larger share of the team’s snaps as well.

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Shanahan: There were never any trade talks about NaVorro Bowman

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When the 49ers denied that linebacker Navorro Bowman was available via trade, the statement permitted a reasonable inference that, while he currently isn’t available, he previously may have been. Meeting with reporters on Tuesday in connection with the commencement of the team’s Organized Team Activities, coach Kyle Shanahan made it clear that there have never been any trade talks involving Bowman.

And in doing so, Shanahan admitted that another veteran 49ers name came up in connection with a potential trade.

“[T]he only trade discussions we had was when another team asked us about [tight end] Vance [McDonald] on draft day,” Shanahan told reporters. “And after a team asked us about Vance then we asked other teams if they’d be interested in that same thing. When it came to NaVorro or any other player on our team, no one’s asked and we haven’t either.”

And so Bowman, who tore an Achilles tendon last season, will remain with the team. He participated in Tuesday’s OTA session, and Shanahan likes what he saw.

“I thought he’s looked real good, kind of what I told you guys the last time I spoke with you,” Shanahan said. “Anytime you’re coming off an Achilles you’re waiting for him to ease into it and from what I’ve seen just watching him, I would have never known that just by watching him. He looks like the guys I’ve seen on tape over the years.”

Bowman signed last year a contract that runs through the 2022 season. He’s due to make $6.75 million in 2017.

McDonald is signed through 2021. He’s due to make $2.1 million this year and presumably remains available in trade. Which maybe should be the real headline of this item but the second period of Penguins-Senators is about to begin.

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Jets sign Marcus Maye, Dylan Donahue

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A couple of Jets rookies signed their first NFL contracts on their first day of Organized Team Activities.

The Jets announced that second-round safety Marcus Maye and fifth-round linebacker Dylan Donahue have agreed to four-year deals with the team. Their signings leave the Jets with two unsigned picks from their nine-player class.

One of those players is safety Jamal Adams, who went in the first round and is expected to join Maye in playing a prominent role right off the bat. Maye broke his arm late in his final season at Florida and was wearing a red jersey during Tuesday’s practice.

Donahue had 25.5 sacks and 37.5 tackles for losses while playing at West Georgia over the last two seasons. It’s a big jump from the Division II Gulf South Conference to the NFL — Donahue was the first West Georgia player to be drafted — but the Jets have enough need for pressure off the edge that the rookie should get a chance to show he can make it.

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Teddy Bridgewater working on the field at Vikings OTAs

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The Vikings have resisted putting any timetable on quarterback Teddy Bridgewater’s recovery from the severe knee injury that kept him out for the entire 2016 season, but Bridgewater appears to be making progress on his path back to playing.

The team posted a video and photos from Tuesday’s first Organized Team Activity of the year that show Bridgewater taking snaps from center and dropping back to throw passes. There’s only so much you can tell from brief moving and still images of a practice in shorts, but Bridgewater appeared to be moving smoothly with a large brace on his left knee and any signs of progress are heartening given how seriously Bridgewater was hurt last summer.

Tuesday’s session was not open to the media, so there was no chance to hear from Bridgewater or Vikings coaches. Wednesday’s session will have media in attendance, however, and Bridgewater’s status will likely be a popular topic of conversation although head coach Mike Zimmer, who is recovering from eye surgery, won’t be there.

The Vikings did not pick up Bridgewater’s contract option for the 2018 season, which opens up the possibility that he’ll be a free agent next offseason. He may also see his contract for this year roll over to next year if he’s placed on the physically unable to perform list to start the regular season, so there’s a lot to play out as the Vikings watch to see how Bridgewater fares physically while taking on a bigger workload.

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Buccaneers ink a trio of draft picks

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On the same day that the Buccaneers launched their annual offseason Organized Team Activities, a trio of players signed their rookie contracts.

Agreed to terms were third-round linebacker Kendell Beckwith (pictured), fifth-round running back Jeremy McNichols, and seventh-round defensive tackle Steve Tu’ikolovatu.

The Buccaneers recently signed first-round tight end O.J. Howard. (That doesn’t really mean anything to the story. I just hated to not have three full paragraphs. Now I do.)

And there’s four.

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J.J. Watt doing everything at OTAs

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The Texans have a big piece of their defense back on the field for Organized Team Activities, but two other key players were on the sidelines as the team moved into the final phase of their offseason work.

Defensive end J.J. Watt missed the final 13 games of the regular season and both playoff games after having his second back surgery of 2016, but is back to doing all the drills at Texans practice. Watt said during the offseason that he’d be more cautious with his individual workouts and reiterated that Tuesday while adding that he’s taking a different approach to team work.

“I think the slow pace applies a little more to the weight room than it does to the field,” Watt said, via the Houston Chronicle. “I don’t like to play slow. The best part is just being back out here with my teammates. It’s so much fun to be in the meetings, to be on the field and be back with the guys. I feel great. I’m sure we’ll have some sort of program where I take a day off here and there, but as far as when I’m allowed to be on the field, I feel awesome.”

Linebackers Brian Cushing and Whitney Mercilus were not on the field with Watt during Tuesday’s practice. Cushing had shoulder surgery early in the offseason and was working on the side.

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Rams OK with Tampa leapfrogging L.A. in Super Bowl order

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Los Angeles lost the 2021 Super Bowl to Tampa today, as the NFL’s owners voted to delay the L.A. Super Bowl by a year because of construction delays on the new stadium. The Rams, who are building the stadium with owner Stan Kroenke’s money, say they’re fine with that.

Rams COO Kevin Demoff said in a statement that the Rams support the NFL’s decision and will now focus on getting the stadium ready a year later than planned.

“As work continues on the transformational sports and entertainment district being built at Hollywood Park, we are looking forward to moments such as a grand opening during the Summer of 2020 and the Super Bowl’s return to Los Angeles after nearly three decades,” Demoff said. “In the past week, we have worked with the NFL on the resolution that was presented today and are supportive of the NFL Owners’ decision to play Super Bowl LV in Tampa and to have Los Angeles host Super Bowl LVI in 2022. Over the next 90 days, we will continue to work with our partners across the Los Angeles region, including the Chargers, to deliver the elements promised in the bid that was approved last year.”

The Rams didn’t have much choice, as the NFL’s rules require a stadium to be open for two full seasons before it can host a Super Bowl. The NFL’s other owners could have voted to give the Rams a waiver and let them host the Super Bowl in the stadium’s first season, but they didn’t do that at today’s owners meeting. Instead, L.A. has been leapfrogged by Tampa, and Los Angeles is still nearly five years away from hosting a Super Bowl.

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Patriots, Gronkowski agree to 2017 incentive package

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Last year, the Patriots and tight end Rob Gronkowski began the process of negotiating a new contract. His latest back surgery derailed that process, and also prevented as a practical matter a new deal in 2017.

That said, the Patriots agreed to the unusual step of giving Gronkowski an incentive package with nothing in return: No reduced salaries, no restructuring, no extra terms. Instead, it’s simply more money based on performance, on top of the money Gronkowski already was due to earn.

Gronkowski had been due to make $5.25 million in 2017, roughly $8.5 million in 2018, and $9 million in 2019. As it now stands, he has a three-tiered incentive package for 2017.

According to agent Drew Rosenhaus, Gronkowski can earn another $5.5 million, another $3 million, or another $1 million under the following formula: (1) if he participates in 90 percent of the offensive snaps OR catches 80 passes OR gains 1,200 receiving yards OR scores 14 touchdowns OR is named a first-team All-Pro, Gronkowski will earn the extra $5.5 million; (2) if he participates in 80 percent of the snaps OR catches 70 passes OR has 1,000 receiving yards OR scores 12 touchdowns, he gets the extra $3 million; or (3) if he participates in 70 percent of the snaps OR catches 60 passes OR has 800 receiving yards OR scores 10 touchdowns, he gets the extra $1 million.

The extra payments would be due in February, with the cap charge applying in 2018.

Gronkowski is a three-time first-team All-Pro, he has two seasons with 90 or more catches, one with more than 14 touchdowns, two with 12 or more, and three with 1,000 or more. Every time he has appeared in at least 15 games (with the exception of his rookie year), Gronkowski has had more than 1,000 receiving yards, and he has been named a first-team All-Pro.

It’s a true win-win, giving Gronkowski something more than what he was entitled to and ensuring that the Patriots will have a happy and motivated player. Talks on a potential extension for the 28-year-old will now be tabled until 2018, and his performance in 2017 will be a major factor in those discussions.

Based on his history, a healthy Gronkowski enhances the chances of the kind of season that will help him become a first-team All-Pro, delivering the $5.5 million regardless of playing time, catches, yards, or touchdowns. The only question is whether, given the various offensive additions the Patriots have made, the ball will come his way often enough to allow him to achieve the kind of performance that gets him enough All-Pro votes.

Given the size and reliability of the target he gives to quarterback Tom Brady, that presence of other options shouldn’t be a major issue.

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NFL will have medical evaluation tent on sidelines

On a day when the NFL would have been wise to borrow college football’s overtime procedures, pro football is instead adopting something else from the amateur game.

Commissioner Roger Goodell told reporters at the conclusion of the ownership meeting in Chicago that the league will use a medical tent on the sidelines in 2017. The University of Alabama first employed the device in 2015, aimed at preventing fans or media from seeing physical examinations that otherwise would in plain view of opponents, media, and fans. Other programs began to adopt the device in 2016.

While useful for the evaluation of various physical ailments without taking him to the locker room, it may not be an appropriate substitute for a locker-room concussion evaluation, which benefits from the player being removed from the noise and the elements of the playing area, possibly with a chance to remove his shoulder pads and relax a bit, allowing for a meaningful assessment of his cognitive abilities.

The tent will inject a high degree of secrecy to the medical evaluation process, putting the media and fans at the mercy of the accuracy of the in-game updates by hiding what sideline reporters or binocular-equipped journalists in the press box otherwise would be able to observe in plain view. While some teams may still do basic evaluations and manipulations in the open, it makes plenty of sense to use and device available to keep prying eyes from nothing anything more than the bare minimum about a given player’s health.

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Goodell still doesn’t think Colin Kaepernick is being blackballed

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At the league meeting two months ago, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said he doesn’t think Colin Kaepernick is being blackballed. Two months later, nothing has changed: Kaepernick is still unemployed, and Goodell still doesn’t think he’s being blackballed.

“It’s the same thing I said before, which is each team makes individual decisions about how they can improve their team. And if they see an opportunity to improve their team I think they do it. They evaluate players, they evaluate systems and coaches, and they all make those individuals decisions to try to improve their team,” Goodell said.

Goodell said he hasn’t given any thought to having a conversation with Kaepernick.

“I wouldn’t be opposed to speaking to him but I haven’t,” Goodell said. “It’s certainly something that I could do but it’s not something I’ve thought about.”

The NFL has taken a lot of criticism over Kaepernick’s continued unemployment, but Goodell sees no reason that he needs to get involved.

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Goodell thinks players will prove Marvin Lewis wrong on celebrations

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Bengals coach Marvin Lewis isn’t happy that the NFL has loosened up its rules on celebrations, but Commissioner Roger Goodell thinks Lewis will change his mind when he actually sees the new rule in place.

Goodell said today that while he understands that Lewis is concerned about allowing poor sportsmanship, Goodell believes players can celebrate without making themselves, their teams or the league look bad.

“I’ve heard it from Marvin before. We’ve had these discussions over the last couple years. I think the players will prove him wrong on that. I think the players will be responsible, show good sportsmanship and do it in a way that is entertaining but also respectful,” Goodell said.

Lewis is surely not the only coach who wants to crack down on celebrations: Football coaches by their very nature dislike anything that draws attention to an individual instead of the entire team. But on this one, Goodell seems to have the support of both players and fans, who think the game should be fun. Even if coaches think it’s deadly serious.

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Marvin Lewis decides dancing is where he draws the line

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Marvin Lewis coaches the team that used a second-round pick on a guy who punched a woman in the face.

Marvin Lewis thinks the NFL’s relaxation of celebration penalties sets a bad example for the youth of America.

Via Katherine Terrell of ESPN.com, the Bengals coach said he was not a fan of the league’s decision to allow expanded touchdown celebrations.

I’m not for that at all,” Lewis said. “We had a good standard and the whole standard has always been you want to teach people how to play the game the correct way and go about it the correct way, and that’s not a very good example for young people.”

Lewis has seen first-hand when individualism is taken to its extreme, having coached Chad Johnson and Terrell Owens, two of the greats of the last generation of players allowed to have fun after achieving a difficult thing.

“The rules were changed for a reason and I thought we had a good outcome,” Lewis said. “Again, this is a team game, and . . . I don’t understand why we want to give in to individual celebrations.”

Of course, it would be easy to suggest that Lewis is focusing on the wrong things, considering the Bengals just drafted Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon, who fell into their laps because there happened to be video of him — stop us if we said this already — punching a woman in the face.

And because it’s easy to suggest that Lewis is focusing on the wrong things, we’ll continue to do it. Particularly when Mixon scores a touchdown this year, the ability to do so which caused the Bengals to ignore the fact he punched a woman in the face.

He better not dance, or else Lewis might have to say enough is enough.

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Roethlisberger on retirement contemplation: “Doesn’t matter, I’m here now”

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Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger contemplated retirement in the offseason. Few believed it. Former teammate Willie Colon did.

“I got to sit down and talk to him and one thing he told me is he did take it seriously,” Colon said last week on PFT Live. “He’s dealt with a lot of injuries.”

Asked Tuesday by reporters about the comments from Colon, Roethlisbeger laughed and said (via Jeremy Fowler of ESPN.com), “What, did you think I was lying?

Regardless of whether he did or didn’t take it seriously (if he’d retired, Roethlisberger would have owed the Steelers $18.6 million), he has decided to recommit, at least for 2017.

“I’m here,” Roethlisberger said. “I’m here on Day One. You see me out there taking every rep I’m supposed to take and then some. I actually took some of the rookies today. I’m 110 percent committed like I said I was.”

So how close did he come to retiring?

“Doesn’t matter,” Roethlisberger said. “I’m here now.”

He’ll be there until he isn’t, and it will be a one-year-at-a-time proposition until he decides in an upcoming offseason that he’s done. Next year, the price for leaving drops to $12.4 million. The next, $6.2 million. Come 2020, he can retire with no financial obligation to the team.

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Marcus Mariota back on the field, even in limited capacity

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The last time we saw Marcus Mariota on a football field, he was being carted off with a broken leg, and with him the Titans chance at a playoff berth.

But Tuesday, even though it was in a limited capacity, he was back on the fields as the Titans began their Organized Team Activities, which was a welcome surprise.

“It felt great,” Mariota said, via Paul Kuharsky of ESPN.com. “Four months ago I wasn’t sure I was going to be able to participate in OTAs and being able to do some of the drills through practice, it [says] a lot about my progress and my recovery. I was very happy and very grateful to be out there.”

The Titans had pledged to take things slowly with Mariota, and he mostly watched during the “team” portion of work. But he did some walk-through and positional drills and a bit of seven-on-seven.

“I know he’d like to do more, he looks like he can do more, but it’s May,” Titans coach Mike Mularkey said. “We’ve got lots of time.”

Mariota had a plate installed to repair the damage suffered on Christmas Eve, at a time when the Titans had a shot at the AFC South. And if he can stay healthy, the strides they made as a team may help remind people that Nashville is something other than a hockey town now.

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