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Former NFL player, assistant Bob Mischak passes away at age 81

Oakland Raiders v New Orleans Saints Getty Images

Bob Mischak, who played seven NFL seasons, earned Pro Bowl honors as a member of the New York Titans and served as a Raiders assistant in the 1970s and 1980s, passed away on Thursday at age 81, the Raiders said today.

Mischak played guard and tight end in his NFL career, making the Pro Bowl in 1961 and 1962 with the Titans (now the Jets), according to Pro Football Reference. In addition to playing for the Titans (1960-1962) and Giants (1958), he played three seasons for the Raiders (1963-65).

Mischak was an assistant with the Raiders for 16 seasons (1973-1987, 1994), coaching tight ends. He played collegiately at Army and also coached at the school.

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6 Responses to “Former NFL player, assistant Bob Mischak passes away at age 81”
  1. raiderapologist says: Jun 26, 2014 9:29 PM

    Bob’s helmet looked nothing like the one in that stock photo. RIP.

  2. chinahand11 says: Jun 26, 2014 9:52 PM

    Sounds like a football name, huh? Bob Mischak. A tough no-foolies guy. In your face.

    RIP Bob.

  3. bornahawker says: Jun 26, 2014 9:58 PM

    Great guy, great life. RIP sir.

  4. Mike Wilkening says: Jun 26, 2014 11:24 PM

    The age has been corrected. Thank you for pointing it out. I regret the error. Thanks again.

  5. raiderspy1 says: Jun 27, 2014 6:10 AM

    The Army for the Oakland Raiders is growing in Heaven today. Another of their soldiers has past and the silver and black shines alittle dimmer here on earth. Al is gathering the troops. Glory be to god.

  6. drhiii says: May 3, 2015 5:37 AM

    I just read, a year later, of Bob Mischak’s passing. I interviewed him a few years ago. This after studying Army football, especially 1953. I watched films of this season at Army.

    I will flat out say the greatest play I have ever seen, in person, on film, reported in print, spoken over radio, whatever… was Bob Mischak. Red Smith broke free in the 4th quarter in the Army v Duke football game, Oct 17th, 1953, at the old Polo Grounds. I have talked to people who saw the play as well as watched it on film. Army was ahead 14-13 with minutes to play. Bob Mischak was playing left defensive, and offensive end. When Reed Smith broke free on a reverse, Bob Mischak was 10 1/2 yards away from him. Smith was home free. Except Bob Mischak ran him down in the greatest single athletic play I have ever seen in any sport, ever. Watching the replay on film is astonishing. Bob Mischak ran him down like a cheetah. Army proceeded to hold Duke, who was ranked #7 at the time to 4 goal line stands, punted, and held them again, to preserve the win. This after Army 2 years earlier has their entire varsity squad wiped out due to a cheating scandal in 1951. Something that seems to barely garner a whimper today… cheating in sports. But Army, ranked #2 at the time, was wiped out. Two years later, this play by Bob Mischak was the single most important play in Army history.

    Interviewing him in 2003, he was a pure gentleman. He said he had all intention of making the Army his career. But he came into the military after the Korean War, ended up in Germany in an unremarkable career path, and finally left the military and only THEN pursued a professional football career. He served his country first and foremost.

    And what was larger… almost every other player from that 1953 team said Bob Mischak was THE MAN. Almost all singled out Bob Mischak as the reason they had a successful season.

    I will submit however… a look at the films from that Army-Duke football game of Oct 17th, 1953, and that single play by Bob Mischak…. it is the single greatest athletic play at the least I have ever viewed. Earl ‘Red’ Blaik awarded the game ball to Bob Mischak. He is quoted as saying “don’t ever give up.” If there is ever a symbol of never give up, it would be that single play by Bob Mischak on that day.

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