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Frank Wycheck: I’m doing worse than most, and concussion settlement gives me nothing

Frank Wycheck Oilers Getty Images

Frank Wycheck says that concussions stemming from an 11-year NFL career have left him with serious symptoms, and he’ll get nothing from the settlement to the concussion lawsuit.

Wycheck, who played in Washington, Houston and Tennessee from 1993 to 2003, estimates he had 15 to 25 concussions. He now says he has migraines, memory loss and depression.

But he has not been diagnosed with any of the cognitive impairments that make players eligible to collect from the settlement while they’re still living. Only players who have been diagnosed with early dementia, moderate dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or ALS are eligible to collect.

“Let’s keep the window dressing off of it as far as having a parade and a standing ovation for it,” Wycheck told the Tennessean. “I know how bad I have been suffering, and I am not eligible to receive a dime. . . . I find it hard to believe there will be a lot of guys eligible for it because there’s not a lot of guys worse than me.”

It is possible that Wycheck has Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, which has been diagnosed in the brains of dozens of deceased former players, many of whom complained of symptoms similar to the symptoms Wycheck is describing. But with CTE, the concussion settlement only provides for players’ estates to collect after they die.

Wycheck believes he should be entitled to something based on what he’s going through right now. But under the terms of the settlement, Wycheck isn’t suffering from anything that would allow him to collect.

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96 Responses to “Frank Wycheck: I’m doing worse than most, and concussion settlement gives me nothing”
  1. brianstevens0915 says: Jul 8, 2014 5:53 PM

    I think in negotiating a contract I would ask for family health insurance for life if I played X amount of years for a particular team. It’s got to be worth something.

  2. ctiggs says: Jul 8, 2014 5:54 PM

    sad to hear this, that being said you signed up to play football!!!

  3. rodvmunchiii says: Jul 8, 2014 5:55 PM

    So he played 11-years, didn’t save money and didn’t acquire any other skills for his post-football life. Perhaps his case is legit, however most are not so it’s hard to actually believe anyone that is out just begging for money.

  4. eaglesnoles05 says: Jul 8, 2014 5:57 PM

    This is an opened can of worms that will keep on spewing…

  5. hakunamangata says: Jul 8, 2014 5:57 PM

    Remind me again of mr. player safety Goodell’s stance on an 18 game schedule.

    I ask you now to bring that up again.

  6. axx1 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:00 PM

    i’m no doctor, but dementia, moderate dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or ALS are pretty common conditions tht occur in older folks. genetics also plays a factor in who gets it or not.

    I wonder if the judge knows that.

  7. thebadguyswon says: Jul 8, 2014 6:01 PM

    I have no sympathy. He chose the sport and he could have easily done a better job planning for his financial future.

  8. joejacks says: Jul 8, 2014 6:02 PM

    What happened to the millions he made playing a gladiator sport?

    Tough to feel sorry for these players as they knew any snap they could be paralyzed or dead. That was a reason they were payed millions per year.

    Wish him and others the best in life

  9. losingisnotanoption says: Jul 8, 2014 6:03 PM

    I have stomach pains, headaches, I have trouble sleeping, I find it difficult to concentrate through a full work day, and I don’t form bonds well with others.

    I think this is all from my work-related stress as a teacher.

    Who do I get to sue?

    I understand these guys played hard, but enough with the sympathy ploy.

  10. psly2124 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:04 PM

    So if you get a million dollars and don’t have it, how will it get paid back after death. These players are making me sick. Most pissed away there money and are broke and depressed because of that. Everyone has pain, everyone lives with it. 99.999% deal with the pain and didn’t make millions that they no longer have.

  11. paychrisjohnson28 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:06 PM

    Sorry to hear that one of the Houston Oiler / Tennessee Titan greats is suffering like he is…hopefully somehow he can find relief from his issues…all who play a physical contact sport take the chance when the head can be injured…things like this can happen… This is why I do not care if my son plays contact sports like this or not… Even though Football is my favorite sport by far…. –Football Fan Dan

  12. ialwayswantedtobeabanker says: Jul 8, 2014 6:06 PM

    “But with CTE, the concussion settlement only provides for players’ estates to collect after they die.”

    What attorney signed off on that provision?

    The specific individuals who are suffering severely at the hands of employers who profited by concealing the material information that led to the damages — are then singled out as not being compensable???

    I am NOT a litigious person — but that is whacked. Hard to accept or even understand how that could be a concession in a global settlement.

  13. gloryfromheaven46 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:07 PM

    I understand the fear and frustration these players have to go through after so many concussions, but when you sign up to play football (especially NFL), you have you realize the sacrifice you’ll be making. Injuries during and life after playing football is definitely part of the game….

  14. bleedrangerblue says: Jul 8, 2014 6:10 PM

    You knew and you played. You were concussed and played. You played..

  15. zeke2517 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:12 PM

    “sad to hear this, that being said you signed up to play football!!!”

    Right… So that team owners could make a whole lot of money off of the players. It’s rather tasteless to shut your brain down and pretend that said owners bear no responsibility in the pervasive degenerative brain disease suffered by scores of the people who kept them in yachts.

  16. marvsleezy says: Jul 8, 2014 6:12 PM

    He took a pretty hard hit actually as he was passing the ball forward on that “music city miracle” gimmick.

  17. ngtitans says: Jul 8, 2014 6:15 PM

    Just want to point out that he’s not begging for money. And he has a job. He does the color commentary on titans radio and is also a morning host on the number 2 sports station in the nation. It’s not about money.

  18. beerbudsnbevo says: Jul 8, 2014 6:16 PM

    When I joined the Marines during the first Gulf War, I knew there was a distinct possibility I could get killed.

    When you play football, starting in Pop Warner, they make you wear a helmet… for a reason.

    Sucks you head is banged up, but nobody made you do it.

    The first thing they tell you when you get to bootcamp…

    We didn’t come to your house and drag you down here, you volunteered.

  19. schmitty2 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:16 PM

    I had stomach pains this afternoon. Thinking about suing the owner of the Mexican place I had lunch at.

  20. Nofoolnodrool says: Jul 8, 2014 6:19 PM

    So he played 11-years, didn’t save money and didn’t acquire any other skills for his post-football life. Perhaps his case is legit, however most are not so it’s hard to actually believe anyone that is out just begging for money.

    I guess if it was you it would be all good right. Your compassion is reflective of the me generation. Karma karma will get your butt.

  21. beerbudsnbevo says: Jul 8, 2014 6:20 PM

    zeke2517 says:
    Jul 8, 2014 6:12 PM
    “sad to hear this, that being said you signed up to play football!!!”

    Right… So that team owners could make a whole lot of money off of the players. It’s rather tasteless to shut your brain down and pretend that said owners bear no responsibility in the pervasive degenerative brain disease suffered by scores of the people who kept them in yachts.

    *******************

    So you are saying Wychek couldn’t afford a couple of yachts with the money the owners paid him?

    Sheesh…

  22. afcdomination says: Jul 8, 2014 6:21 PM

    my father has all of this, its kind of sad, just starting

    however…he didn’t play Pro Football. he played HS and then College Division 1 football. that was 8 years of pounding his head into a wall, basically.

    I find it humerous how much heat the NFL takes, a league who has paid these guys quite well to play a game, when its pop warner, HS/ College and the pros that does it.

    show me the guy with zero playing time before the pros or very little, who then has major issues from ONLY playing pro ball. you can’t. so go after pop warner, HS, College and we can get rid of football like the direction we are headed.

  23. mnsurferpimp says: Jul 8, 2014 6:22 PM

    So many of you do not understand this lawsuit! That has to be why you are filled with hate & contempt! You do understand that back in 1993, a player like him maybe received 3-4 million over a 10 year career! They didn’t make the $20 million per year like today’s athletes do. If your employer is telling you that just suck it up , it’s a small bump on the head, get back in there . That there is nothing to worry about, and there are no long term effects for the head trauma your getting, (all the while, knowing on the contrary. That indeed , down the road, many of these guys will be eating their In&Out burgers through a straw ) you would be upset too.
    Now , there is a monetary fund that can help with Therapy, and medical testing and research that could improve your quality of life, but , you cannot touch it because your not “bad” enough? Shame on the league and shame on the people that knew just how bad the future of some of these guys will be:…. But, the majority of you guys think it’s their fault and they are just whiny athletes that spent all their $ on lot lizards and coke!!!! Smh

  24. officialgame says: Jul 8, 2014 6:23 PM

    If he was diagnosed with cognitive defect he would get money. He is able to do things but chooses to be bitter and beg for money? Another spoiled athlete wanting something for nothing.

  25. sportsfan18 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:26 PM

    beerbudsnbevo says:
    Jul 8, 2014 6:16 PM
    When I joined the Marines during the first Gulf War, I knew there was a distinct possibility I could get killed.

    When you play football, starting in Pop Warner, they make you wear a helmet… for a reason.

    Sucks you head is banged up, but nobody made you do it.

    The first thing they tell you when you get to bootcamp…

    We didn’t come to your house and drag you down here, you volunteered.

    0 0
    Report comment

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Thank you for your service.

  26. gotitan says: Jul 8, 2014 6:27 PM

    For every poster who whines about Wychek’s inability to either save money or blew it, you should understand what he does now and how he makes his a living. I realize many of you put everyone in this situation in the same easy box, but #89 is not broke or begging for a handout. He has a job and goes to work like many of us each and everyday.

  27. padraighansen says: Jul 8, 2014 6:35 PM

    I understand all of contempt, to a degree, that many people are spewing forth out here regarding this.

    But if the NFL knew of the longterm effects of it’s game and hid those findings from the players, they rightfully should be reamed.

    Now, some of you may disagree. I understand that. But legally – the NFL is hosed if they knowingly withheld this information, as has been suggested by various media outlets.

    As such, the NFL is doing itself no help with the court of public opinion by continuing to push an 18 game season.

    Bill Gates said it best: Success has a way of seducing smart people into thinking they cannot lose.

  28. r8drn8tn says: Jul 8, 2014 6:45 PM

    Most people are just dense. A player that does not understand the risks cannot make the decision to take those risks. The players in the NFL now all know the risk but that is not the case.

    The majority of us are just now learning the risks associated with concussions. But if the NFL knew this for decades and still sent players back on the field to make more money then they should be held liable. PERIOD.

    There is no way to be accountable if you don’t know the risks and your employer hides the risks from you.

  29. jimmysee says: Jul 8, 2014 6:46 PM

    This is a tough crowd. Maybe we should tell soldiers who are wounded in battle — “The V.A. — forget it. You enlisted. You know what you were getting into. Stop crying.”

  30. ninerider says: Jul 8, 2014 6:46 PM

    So do cops get to sue their departments if they get shot? Do firemen if they get burned? Or do EMTs or nurses if they contract a disease? No, they don’t. Their medical expenses get covered by their insurance and if they are still in the hole, the departments usually have a fundraiser. Theses ladies and gentleman knew the risks associated with the professions they chose and get paid a fraction of athletes. These athletes got paid and should have saved some of their money in a rainy day fund like every other Joe blow.

  31. mackcarrington says: Jul 8, 2014 6:49 PM

    All that matters is that football players go out and risk their health for the benefit of the fans entertainment. Don’t expect any sympathy from these people when you can’t recall your own name at the age of 50.

  32. tiger2471 says: Jul 8, 2014 6:50 PM

    These guys gave their bodies, their minds and helped build the game that we as Americans love. The NFL makes Billions every year and there should be a much better healthcare program for these guys after they retire, period. In order to get the proper care they had to sue and I hope the NFL has to pay Billions in order to resolve this issue. Sure, they knew there would be injuries but I really doubt they knew that these injuries would affect them in such devastating manner.

  33. SilentMajority says: Jul 8, 2014 6:52 PM

    Of course he’s going to complain about the settlement…He’s depressed! What else is he going to say everything is wonderful?

  34. pacodawg says: Jul 8, 2014 6:55 PM

    My hunch says old reliable would have played knowing the risks in advance.

  35. mcconne77 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:02 PM

    Concussions are serious problems, causing migraines, memory loss, and depression. The best way to deal with those who are fighting the effects of concussions? We should follow the lead of the Political Correctness crowd. Let’s change the name of concussions to something less offensive.

  36. FinFan68 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:09 PM

    He now says he has migraines, memory loss and depression.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    I have occasional migraines, memory loss and depression also but I never had a concussion due to football. We are close to the same age so I would guess that aging/genetics/diet are just as likely as concussions.

    Ask Frank how many of those 15-25 concussions did he notify the team of? How many did he actively try to hide from his employer? How many happened while he was in the NFL and how many happened in college/HS/pee wee, etc.? Ask him why the NFLPA never bothered to say anything since they had the same information that it is claimed the NFL hid from the players? (NFLPA has not been named in any lawsuits for this)

  37. jaranspringer says: Jul 8, 2014 7:13 PM

    Wait until the UFC and Boxers Start complaining I mean they deal with it worse I’d say, all the head trauma and knockouts, man I don’t know. If you don’t want to get hurt don’t join the sport.

    It sure seems bad that all these guys are hurting but you don’t have to lead with your head and you don’t have to play football in the first place. Try telling George Foreman that football is harder on your body than boxing.

  38. NFLJunkie says: Jul 8, 2014 7:15 PM

    rodvmunchiii | Jul 8, 2014, 4:55 PM CDT
    So he played 11-years, didn’t save money and didn’t acquire any other skills for his post-football life. Perhaps his case is legit, however most are not so it’s hard to actually believe anyone that is out just begging for money.
    ———–

    Yeah, kind of missing the point. He’s not “begging for money”. He’s pointing out that unless you fit a very narrow list of diagnoses, then no matter how real and debilitating the symptoms, you’re out of luck. Doesn’t matter if you’re a guy who had a long, mostly profitable career like Wycheck (who is gainfully employed, post-football) or a journeyman practice squad player who stuck around long enough to get seriously concussed, but never made any big money.

    So, lots of guys legitimately suffering are left out of the settlement. That’s the point.

  39. nite2al says: Jul 8, 2014 7:17 PM

    Why do you people blame these guys so much when they go broke? Many rich people who aren’t football players go broke. If you make millions a year, you don’t live in a house with a $1,000 mortgage.

  40. brownsmakemecrazy says: Jul 8, 2014 7:18 PM

    It’s amazing how ignorant so many of you are that post.

    The NFL hid the severity of the long term effects of concussions that’s why they don’t want all the information they knew disclosed, because it will make them look like the scum they are.

    I sure hope some attorney and some judge has the common sense to make them disclose what they knew.

    Sounds like the players current attorneys are in the cash grab business and I don’t know what this idiot female judge is thinking, by thinking this is an acceptable verdict. Wow justice is not only blind but apparently it’s stupid too.

  41. silverandblack052099 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:19 PM

    Can’t we consider memory loss early dementia in a retired NFL player?

  42. bhindenemylines says: Jul 8, 2014 7:23 PM

    r8drn8tn says:
    Jul 8, 2014 6:45 PM
    Most people are just dense. A player that does not understand the risks cannot make the decision to take those risks. The players in the NFL now all know the risk but that is not the case.

    The majority of us are just now learning the risks associated with concussions. But if the NFL knew this for decades and still sent players back on the field to make more money then they should be held liable. PERIOD.

    There is no way to be accountable if you don’t know the risks and your employer hides the risks from you.
    ——————–

    You’re kidding me right???? Do you think players thought there would not be any long term affects from playing football. They wear helmets, shoulder pads, thigh pads, hip pads, face masks, etc. They wear them for a reason. Does the NBA require any of these? No, because it’s not a contact sport. Does MLB? They wear helmets because there’s is a chance of taking a pitch to the skull. Same with the NHL. If you have to wear protective gear that means you have a chance of getting hurt. And if you understand that an sign a contract (with or without extensive healthcare coverage) then you deal with the good and the bad. And if you don’t understand that banging your head into another person’s 20-30 times a day on Sundays then you’re an idiot and get what you deserve. I’m sorry it’s happening to people but it was your decision.

  43. morr24 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:35 PM

    Are we to just assume his depression, headaches, etc. are automatically because he played professional football? That is absurd. I wish him well, but these seeming automatic causal connections are dangerous and unfair.

    I wonder what portion of the population suffers from depression, memory loss (common with age….especially short term memory loss), and intermittent headaches. What percentage played in the NFL?

  44. catquick says: Jul 8, 2014 7:38 PM

    Jimmysee………they do do that

  45. youknowwhatsgoodforshoulderpain says: Jul 8, 2014 7:39 PM

    Tony Hawk has had tons of concussions in his life that were skateboard-related (falling on his head I suppose). I wonder how bad his brain is gonna be in 10 years or so.

  46. shotpeen says: Jul 8, 2014 7:40 PM

    Why can’t these players purchase their own long term care insurance, with their own money? If you don’t know the risks of playing a violent game such as football, then you’re not too smart to begin with.

  47. jf203 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:40 PM

    Next…..get off the stage……..

    NO SYMPATHY for any of these guys…..if your head hurts in your early years..simple..STOP PLAYING..but everyone is too egomaniacal cos they want their money..their day in the spotlight, and then still want to sue.

    EVERY PLAYER COMING IN SHOULD SIGN A LIABILITY WAIVER..or else DONT PLAY

  48. alshonbrandontandem says: Jul 8, 2014 7:41 PM

    Say you’re an undrafted rookie who plays special teams but played for the entire year. What is the NFL minimum salary? $200k or around that? Now a bad salary, not to mention the other perks you receive. Now name me a career that pays a 22 yr old fresh out of college $200k/yr. Now I know their are jobs that pay that but not many at all.

    You get paid well, you are famous, and your job is to play a game. Yes it has risks, big risks, but you knew that when you signed the contract.

    No sympathy at all for any of these guys….

  49. donnymacjack says: Jul 8, 2014 7:41 PM

    Why is it the NFL’s fault that he isn’t getting some money? If you wanted better you should have either a) Opted out of the class-action and moved forward with your own suit. or b) hired better attorneys to negotiate a better settlement. Hell the judge already had to go back once and tell the players attorneys to do better, obviously those guys are cutting it.

  50. realfootballfan says: Jul 8, 2014 7:41 PM

    Keep saying you don’t care and watch as more and more mothers get hold of their children and steer them toward basketball and baseball, and you’re watching a worse product as the years go on. It’s already happening now. I’m sure those guys who went in mines and got black lung didn’t think it was the safest profession either, but I doubt any of them figured they would get terminal cancer directly related to what they did for work.

  51. alshonbrandontandem says: Jul 8, 2014 7:42 PM

    ** Not a bad salary, dumb phone

  52. stew48 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:42 PM

    It is just unbelievably sad to read so many of these comments that reflect total ignorance of the facts, historically, and the judgment of others that is so harsh. To compare serving our country in war to playing football in any way is just ludicrous. I will not waste your time or mine in pointing out the huge difference; you know anyway.

  53. marauders127 says: Jul 8, 2014 7:46 PM

    You choose to play football. You choose to still get paid talking about football. You choose not to invest wisely. You choose to go back in the game because you know you may lose your job if you are on the sideline. If you play football, your quality of life will suffer. Period.

  54. swadehoo says: Jul 8, 2014 7:47 PM

    Sounds like he’s middle aged to me. Stop making excuses and but a sports car.

  55. Canton Bulldogs says: Jul 8, 2014 7:47 PM

    This is a tough crowd. Maybe we should tell soldiers who are wounded in battle — “The V.A. — forget it. You enlisted. You know what you were getting into. Stop crying.”

    I get the point you are trying it make but you really can’t compare wounded in action to a sports related injury. The former people are literally trying to kill you. The later is an accident. The issue is whether or not the NFL knew the long term effects of a concussion and hid it. Guarantee the defense department is holding no secrets about how real are the bullets and bombs.

  56. daltonsdumptruck says: Jul 8, 2014 7:59 PM

    forward lateral payback

  57. radar8 says: Jul 8, 2014 8:02 PM

    A lot of these players did not know the long-term effects of concussions. The NFL did know and did nothing. IN fact, the NFL would send these concussed guys right back in the game to take more hits.

    That’s what the suit was about.

    Remember, many of these players are not the brightest bulbs in the box, but they still deserve to receive compensation the damage caused (unknown to them at the time).

  58. billsboy88 says: Jul 8, 2014 8:04 PM

    Admit that you threw that ball forward on that music city “lateral” and maybe I’ll feel a little compassion

  59. shrimpking55 says: Jul 8, 2014 8:14 PM

    I really don’t understand these athletes who knew very well that football is a dangerous sport. To be suing the NFL, the sport that gave them what they chose was their best opportunity to financial stability is cowardly. It was their choice and some of these athletes are suing bc they mismanaged their money.

  60. Angry Orange Man says: Jul 8, 2014 8:50 PM

    All the “experts” trying to talk tough about this probably wouldn’t even be able to properly put on a full set of gear. How many of you morons knew all these findings 10 years ago? You “it’s not me so who cares?” Folks are the scum of the earth and even more of a problem than the PC Police everyone complains about.

  61. steelcurtainn says: Jul 8, 2014 9:05 PM

    All them head injuries and no championships to show for. What a shame. He chose the profession.

  62. hunt3rjo3 says: Jul 8, 2014 9:14 PM

    I imagine everyone commenting saying these “NFL players who mismanaged there money” have little clue how these guys live there lives. Whycheck for example has been doing radio weekdays and calling Titans radio games since he retired, and I find it hard to believe he is broke. I think it stems from just wanting a piece of the pie, and everyone on here is lying if they said they wouldn’t want a settlement from the NFL after years of playing in the league. Especially when a bunch of people you played with are trying the same.

  63. beattention says: Jul 8, 2014 9:18 PM

    Playing football has always been dangerous and to those that are now complaining puts me in mind of people that loved smoking but soon wanted attention of their plight when they got cancer.

  64. thereyougo2 says: Jul 8, 2014 9:27 PM

    There are plenty of hedge funds who will lend him a large amount for a lein on his post life settlement. It’s America, everyone makes something off this ruling.

    Of course the media will make a story out of people like Frank W.

  65. beerbudsnbevo says: Jul 8, 2014 9:34 PM

    jimmysee says:
    Jul 8, 2014 6:46 PM
    This is a tough crowd. Maybe we should tell soldiers who are wounded in battle — “The V.A. — forget it. You enlisted. You know what you were getting into. Stop crying.”

    **********************

    Huge difference my man…

    One serves his country and risks life and limb for just more than minimum wage.

    One plays a game for millions.

    Check it.

  66. trytobnimble says: Jul 8, 2014 9:51 PM

    The knuckle-dragger class that choose to comment on this site fail to recognize that Mr Wycheck began his career before free agency even existed. He did not play in an era of big bucks. Just missed it. Besides, he was a tight end who wouldn’t have earned very much money anyway. He wasn’t a spoiled dumb kid who didn’t know how to manage his money. He didn’t earn that much. And then his football career left him debilitated enough to hinder another meaningful career.

    The guy has a legitimate story to tell and it’s a sad one. But mostly I’m left with this continued feeling of shock at how brutally callous the people who comment here are. About so much. No humanity at all. That’s the really sad story.

  67. campcouch says: Jul 8, 2014 10:00 PM

    Guys don’t plan for life after football. Even my poor self paid for medical coverage. Now I get his complaint that money will be given to guys who are nearly incapacitated or close to death, why not help a guy not reach that point, but still, there has to be a point where you have to budget. Retire where you don’t have to rely on a steady income. Buy land and build a reasonable house, calculate taxes and utilities, pay for medical insurance and relax. But these guys buy mansions and ranches and everything that comes with it and spend like crazy. I feel for his injury, I don’t feel for his mismanagement.

  68. sanjose61 says: Jul 8, 2014 10:06 PM

    “Only players who have been diagnosed with early dementia, moderate dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or ALS are eligible to collect.”

    But people who suffer(ed) from CTE aren’t eligible?

    People like Dave Duerson, Junior Seau, and Mike Webster?

    CTE is a direct result of concussions. The lawsuit/settlement is referred to as “The Concussion Lawsuit.”

    Does this make any sense to anyone? Doesn’t make any sense to me.

  69. arcross12042004scorp15 says: Jul 8, 2014 10:10 PM

    I’m 60 years old, times were different when I was growing up then they are now. We used to play baseball ( throw at a guy’s head without helmets and a fight would break out)and football ( tackle without equipment)
    every day. We had concussions long before we went to High School to play football. We used to have weekly bare knuckle fights to see who was the toughest guy at the playground. We played High School football and I played rugby in college. I had multiple concussions ( Saw Stars, broke teeth etc. ) This was the same thing that a lot of former NFL players did before HS & College. My friends and I have a lot of the same issues that the NFL players are stating. How do you determine that these issues are a result of hits in the NFL and not before ?

  70. sanjose61 says: Jul 8, 2014 10:16 PM

    One thing people have to remember is that the lawsuit/settlement lumps all former players together.

    Wycheck for instance played from 1993 till 2003. While this is fairly recent it’s still during a time when the NFL went to great lengths to minimize any concern about concussions.

    The NFL’s concussion czar Elliott Pellman (who as Jets team Dr. sent Wayne Chrebet back into a game he had been concussed in) reigned from 1994 till 2007. Pellman constantly told players and public that concussions were not a cause for concern.

    So some people here have to factor these facts into their opinions about the players and assumed risks.

    In contrast, guys like Mike Webster played at a time when concussions were laughed off as “having your bell rung.” Concussions during his career were absolutely not considered a big deal.

    Wycheck is in a grey area. Arguably he should have had more of an inkling… after all Troy Aikman retired in 2000 due to concussions and Steve Young in 1999.

    Yet remember, the NFL was still saying during Wycheck’s career that concussions were not a big deal.

    However the NFL still

  71. janvanflac says: Jul 8, 2014 10:34 PM

    It is not normal to have memory/cognitive issues in your early 40s. I played high school and college ball and have none of these, at 48 but I also didn’t suffer multiple concussions and didn’t play into my 30s. The NFL is a multi billion dollar business, with the exception of a few superstars the money these guys make is peanuts especially after the taxes, agents etc. get paid. If the NFL knowingly withheld information about long term brain damage they should absolutely get reamed.

  72. chewingonlightbulbs says: Jul 8, 2014 10:37 PM

    Can someone remind me which concussion lawsuit this is? It’s getting hard to keep track. And I didn’t even play professional football.

  73. rhfast says: Jul 8, 2014 10:52 PM

    Just a fact check for the guy who said he made 3 million for a 10 yr career. He made 7 million just in his last 3 years. He was a very high draft pick I am sure he made a decent amount for the first 8 years too, no rookie cap back then.

  74. genericcommenter says: Jul 8, 2014 10:56 PM

    It’s true that these guys chose the profession and were paid well.

    Still, I find it a little odd that if you have a job typing on a computer and develop carpal tunnel, you could legitimately get paid for life. But if you have your head beat in at a job, you are on your own.

  75. titan765 says: Jul 8, 2014 10:57 PM

    Nobody forced you to play football. You signed a contract to play football. You got paid to play.

  76. jf203 says: Jul 8, 2014 10:57 PM

    Wow must be a lot of liberals on this board…..probably think Obama is doing a good job its amazing how braindead the American public is in every facet

  77. vikinganswer says: Jul 8, 2014 11:07 PM

    Don’t play if you get a concussion let alone 20 of them. DUH.

  78. zemongoose says: Jul 8, 2014 11:32 PM

    A little bit of empathy goes a long way in this world, you sad little men.

  79. codiablo says: Jul 8, 2014 11:37 PM

    hmn, my dad got to play professional killing in vietnam and all he got from the govt was a round way ticket to the bullet strewn jungles of southeast asia, exposure to agent orange, ptsd and colon cancer…darn it Mr. Wycheck…you got a raw DEAL!

  80. condor75 says: Jul 8, 2014 11:38 PM

    sad to hear this, that being said you signed up to play football!!! People that fly buy tickets for travel not a crash…shut up

  81. condor75 says: Jul 8, 2014 11:41 PM

    I really don’t understand these athletes who knew very well that football is a dangerous sport. To be suing the NFL, the sport that gave them what they chose was their best opportunity to financial stability is cowardly. It was their choice and some of these athletes are suing bc they mismanaged their money.
    So people in car accidents sue ever day, driving is very dangerous. It is one thing to take risk when you have all the facts, clearly deception is another matter, but clearly you aren’t bothered by facts

  82. condor75 says: Jul 8, 2014 11:44 PM

    I had stomach pains this afternoon. Thinking about suing the owner of the Mexican place I had lunch at. You think you are funny but you actually prove a point, restaurant owners have a responsibility to ensure the safety of customers or they get sued

  83. jagsfanugh says: Jul 8, 2014 11:47 PM

    NFLPA should have told them. I just think it’s a cash grab and Frank is no different.

  84. bittersportspills says: Jul 8, 2014 11:59 PM

    beerbudsnbevo says:
    Jul 8, 2014 6:16 PM
    When I joined the Marines during the first Gulf War, I knew there was a distinct possibility I could get killed.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Spare me the “I was in the military and I faced death daily” stuff. Yeah, you could get killed but the great majority of military personnel don’t. In fact, you’re more likely to get injured in training or other non-combat activities than killed on a battlefield. Military personnel have an extensive medical system to treat our injuries; during and after our careers. Apparently, that type of system isn’t available to NFL players despite the tremendous amount of money the league pulls in for itself. Otherwise, it couldn’t afford to pay its commissioner > $30M/year.
    I retired from my 21 year military career with the right to get medical care at no cost through the VA. Instead, I got private health insurance. That doesn’t mean I’m going to dump on the guys who can’t afford to go my route. Some of those guys made a lot more money than I did, too.
    Parents are wondering if they should allow their kids to play the sport. Perhaps the NFL should work harder on taking care of its players post career.

  85. djstat says: Jul 9, 2014 12:05 AM

    The owners knew? Says who? The owner who employed Wychek is dead why is a new owner responsible?

  86. gregmorris78 says: Jul 9, 2014 1:04 AM

    Whaaaaaaaaaa……

  87. rskinzluva says: Jul 9, 2014 1:33 AM

    Why are some saying he’s broke or he chose to play? First, he didn’t say he’s broke, he said he’d have to die before he benifitted. Second, at the time he played, players didn’t know the effects of cincussions, but the NFL did and hid it from players. Stop reading more into or adding, what you/they , know now but didn’t then into article. You’d seem or might be smarter, in some people’s eyes.

  88. stewart09 says: Jul 9, 2014 1:43 AM

    “But with CTE, the concussion settlement only provides for players’ estates to collect after they die.” this one bit shows the awful power of the NFL with its army of lawyers, basically when he was playing in the NFL they(the nfl) were flat out lying about concussions(read league of denial for more info) he was not allowed a informed decision like all players now when they sign their contracts even if he wasted all his money the nfl is still responsible for his brain injuries but with this settlement the only way for his family to get anything is if he puts a bullet in his chest so they can study his brain to find he has CTE…..

  89. sparty0n says: Jul 9, 2014 3:33 AM

    Canton Bulldogs says:
    “Guarantee the defense department is holding no secrets about how real are the bullets and bombs.”

    _________________________________

    Bulldog, I love that line and agree with you. You cannot compare the two.

    Anyone who tries to compare a regulated sport with referees to realtime military battle, is an idiot.

  90. sparty0n says: Jul 9, 2014 3:46 AM

    Consider this…
    Dennie Byrd, Mike Utley, Darryl Stingley, …. I’l never get the Joe Thiesmann injury out of my head. These are guys come to mind right away, and there has to be more. I know there were were some college players as well.

    The point is, the players above were severely injured playing the game. Their teammates watched it, and kept playing. How could the players not know it was dangerous, even long term? Former players have complained of knee problems for years and years. They knew what they were doing when they signed the contract.

  91. titansbro says: Jul 9, 2014 8:10 AM

    They knew it was dangerous, they knew they could get a knee blown out or an ankle busted or a shoulder popped. But they did not know they could get a concussion what would cause them not to remember their own kids’ names in 20 years or not be able to hold a damn fork to eat. Hell, they didn’t even really know about concussions. To them they just got their “bell rung” & were told to go back in the game. They actually believed there were no long term effects. The NFL DID KNOW, & they HID IT FROM THE PLAYERS. Frank Wychek is not looking for a handout, he was one of the most classy players the league had in his day. The dude also has a post-football career. But that doesn’t mean that what he’s going through isn’t real.

    The NFL very much should be held liable for their actions. Amazing to me when people side with mega-corporations who screw over their own employees.

  92. freshnsoclean says: Jul 9, 2014 8:52 AM

    I’ve had everything he’s listed without football. Chronic migraines lead to a deep depression and both caused memory loss, which lead to no work or money. At a point I was about to give up and check out, but I battled my way out. Biggest thing was finding a meaning to life and getting off all the dumb medication to treat it all. That stuff is poison.

    Now I’m stronger than ever. I feel for him, but it’s all in your head. If you let it destroy you, it will.

  93. danno1212 says: Jul 9, 2014 9:51 AM

    Every adult should know, the most likely place to get hurt or killed is at work. I always understood that, does that mean I shouldn’t expect workman’s comp, an injury settlement or a death benefit?

  94. 4ever9er says: Jul 9, 2014 1:31 PM

    The Current and Former players should be asking for lifetime health and mental health care benefits from the NFL, the NFL should be happy to do so. Giving the players the money won’t help because they will never get enough to pay for the medical bills that will continue for the rest of their lives.

    Let’s all remember that all of the players situations are not the same and stop assuming that players either blew their money or didn’t save, have a little more compassion for the human being and not the perceived spoiled overpaid former football player.

  95. anothervoiceofreason says: Jul 9, 2014 9:56 PM

    Once a person is no longer employed by a company that offers a group health care plan, insurance companies have the unilateral option of declining coverage to anyone for pre-existing conditions. I worked for companies for 20+ years before starting my own business, and I was declined an individual healthcare policy by every company in the US because of pre-existing neck problems due to a car accident as a teen. I had an injury that landed me in ICU for 3 days…bill = $50,000. Do I deserve to be chastised for not having saved enough of my $50-$75k/year salary (before taxes) to easily pay that bill? What if it were a recurrent injury that cost that much annually?

    Imagine an NFL player earning the league minimum for a few years as a special teams player before his career ended due to multiple concussions. Could he conceivably accrue up to $200-300k in medical bills (easy to do when treated by neurologists and other specialists) to treat concussion-related medical issues? What if that becomes an annual expenditure? Did these guys know those types of medical expenses were in their futures? How many have been turned down for individual policies because of their various pre-existing conditions? Money can buy a lot of things, but it can’t buy you an individual health insurance policy.

    How many of you calling these ex-players “cash grabbers” who “blew all their money” have EVER found yourselves in a bind because you couldn’t get healthcare coverage due to pre-existing exclusions, no matter how much you were willing to pay for a policy? Do some research about the state of our healthcare system and the costs of physicians, specialists, and hospital stays before pointing fingers and just assuming that all of these ex-players were earning Peyton Manning type paychecks and could afford to cover the health expenses for a small nation.

  96. dodohead418 says: Jul 16, 2014 2:01 PM

    The way I see it is if you request something logical in the contract like possibly all the players that sued the NFL did they were met with a fight back because the NFL has made it known that its an union, so it wants to get all the profit to themselves.

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