Jameis Winston’s accuser wants investigation records from NFL, Buccaneers

AP

The Miranda warnings — the admonition that anything you say can and will be used against you — doesn’t apply only within the confines of statements made to the police. Under the rules of evidence in most American jurisdictions, anything that a party to litigation has said out of court can be used in court, regardless of the rule against hearsay.

And so it’s no surprise that the lawyers representing Erica Kinsman want to find out what Buccaneers quarterback Jameis Winston said to the NFL and/or the team last year, in advance of his selection as the first overall pick in the draft. According to Matt Baker of the Tampa Bay Times, Kinsman’s lawyers have issued subpoenas aimed at obtaining all relevant records generated by the league and the Buccaneers.

The Bucs claimed last year that they conducted a thorough investigation of Winston, who is accused of sexually assaulting Kinsman in December 2012. Also, Winston voluntarily went to New York to meet with Commissioner Roger Goodell in advance of being picked.

While it’s highly unlikely that Winston admitted wrongdoing to the league or the team, Kinsman’s lawyers will compare anything he said in that setting to anything he has said in any other setting, in the hopes of showing that he has told inconsistent stories. If Winston’s statements conflict in any significant way, Kinsman’s lawyers would use those contradictions to suggest that Winston isn’t telling the truth about what happened — and that Kinsman is.

Credibility always is important in court. Credibility becomes critical where, as in this case, two different people will sharing with the jury two dramatically different versions of the truth. If one has consistently told the same story and the other is all over the place, that becomes relevant to figuring out who should be believed.

33 responses to “Jameis Winston’s accuser wants investigation records from NFL, Buccaneers

  1. I work in Zephyrhills where Erica Kinsman lived and went to high school. Everyone in town knew she was a cleat chasing ho. Looking forward to all the dirt in her past coming out in court.

  2. Nobody believes the Kinsman side of the story but her lawyers.

    Not her friends, not other students, not independent investigators, not university investigators, not the NFL, and neither will the judge.

  3. Erica Kinsman’s story has changed often. Why do you not state these facts or that he has already been through 3 hearings and all have been ruled in his favor? She has every right to do whatever is in her lawyers legal right

  4. “Everything ruled in his favor? You mean like the university paying out $950,000 to her and her lawyers this week?

    How is that in his favor?”

    Unfortunately the way that most major companies (in this case, university) handle lawsuits are on a bottom line basis. I.E., it would cost FSU far more in legal fees to drag this out for years than what they paid out in settlement. The bad part is, while its better financially for the university to do this, it’s worse for most everyone else because money/publicity seekers will be emboldened because they know there will be a payday at the end of the rainbow. In my opinion, and in the opinion of most that have been actually paid attention to this, this is exactly what happened here. I haven’t heard one credible source with knowledge of this case claim that Winston is guilty of this.

  5. …. Nobody believes the Kinsman side of the story but her lawyers.

    Not her friends, not other students, not independent investigators, not university investigators, not the NFL, and neither will the judge….

    That may be true, but if she can convince a CIVIL jury, that only needs to be 51% convinced, she can win and win a lot, not just from the kid, but from the School, and possibly the police/procecutor (if there was ever any cover up)

    js

  6. …….college served her well. She got close to a million from the university…she’ll get lets say 3 million from winstons side to finally go away….pay the lawyers 1 million and she clears 2 million for her lies. Not bad for a drunken roll in the hay with a athlete.

  7. They want to see if Winston’s story is inconsistent?

    What, as opposed to her ever changing version of events? Google the case, read the news reports and time and time again, her story changes.

    This is a clear case of someone looking for a payday and not justice. Which is pretty disgusting, because it takes credibility away from people who have actually suffered this horrendous crime.

  8. She reported the alleged rape immediately after the encounter, and before she knew he was a star football player. Doesn’t sound like a liar to me.

  9. I find it ironic that her lawyers want to find inconsistencies in Winston’s story when their own client has 6 different versions of the incident.

    Nothing she has said has been shown to be proven factual. She even lied in the “Hunting Ground” claiming she was drugged but tests (and her own testimony later) showed she wasn’t.

    Jameis will win against as he always has because she’s full of crap.

  10. What makes anyone think his comments to teh league and Bucs would be any different than testimony and prior evidence? Does anyone think, that if he did do this, he would reveal incriminating details to the league or Bucs, who are thinking of letting him play?

    This smells of an opportunity for more publicity, that’s all.

  11. rape, rape, rape, rape, rape. rapity rapey rape. rapey rapey rape.
    ray-hee-a-e-ape. raper, raperoo. raperino rapey rapity rape.

  12. nicofthenorthstar says:
    Jan 29, 2016 9:56 AM
    Justice, Florida style: “So you’re an exceptional football player.
    We’re good. Case closed.”
    ——–

    Justice, Social media style: “Let’s ignore the facts stated in public record and assume the same, tired, ‘Give him a pass because he is a great player and makes the university money'” line.”

  13. abninf says:
    Jan 29, 2016 7:28 AM
    She reported the alleged rape immediately after the encounter, and before she knew he was a star football player. Doesn’t sound like a liar to me.
    ————

    However, she came back months later, after he WAS known (including by her) to be a star in the making and lighting up the skies, after drastically changing her description of the supposed attacker and naming him out of the blue.

    This is a classic case of why liars fail. You have to keep telling lies to keep the first one going and end up getting trapped in the lie in the end.

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