Eagles go old school with Lane Johnson contract

AP

Not that long ago (in the grand scheme of things), the Eagles liked to target young players for long-term extensions that pay good money now — but that ultimately ended up compensating the player well below the top of the market. The contracts given to tackle Lane Johnson conjures memories of deals that ultimately resulted in acrimony, once the players fell far behind their peers on the compensatory pecking order.

The best (worst) example came 10 years ago, when the Eagles signed guard Shawn Andrews through the 2015 season.

Johnson, a first-round pick in 2013, became eligible for a new contract once the 2015 regular season ended. With one year left on his rookie deal and a six-year deal, Johnson is now under contract through 2021.

The market will change dramatically over the course of a deal that reportedly pays Johnson $35.5 million guaranteed, with a maximum value of $63 million. Whatever the details of the deal (and they’ll eventually be made available), there’s a chance that, by 2018 or 2019, Johnson won’t be as thrilled with his contract as he currently is — especially as he prepares to become the team’s full-time left tackle, a more valuable position than playing on the right side.

The deal may end up being a very good one for the Eagles, helping them craft a favorable cap situation well into the future. But as the cap continues to increase significantly and as the market for tackles inevitable keeps climbing, they’ll have to hope that Johnson never comes to the conclusion once he sees what other players are getting paid that he got a raw deal from the Eagles.

39 responses to “Eagles go old school with Lane Johnson contract

  1. Kobe Bryant insisted on signing a 2 year 48 million dollar contract to end his career because that what he felt he was worth. Obviously his worth to the Lakers has made them much more than that but the past two years have been two of the worst in Lakers history. American Greed has plenty of drawbacks.

  2. Florio, I don’t understand why you feel Lane Johnson was short changed by signing this extension. You can’t build a team by paying everyone top dollar. The negative perspective on financial security for this man, his family and future generations of his family can’t be enough? If I were lucky enough to be in a position where I could negotiate contracts with players I would go about it this same way. Identify young homegrown talent and have the conversation with them where you say…”look we would love to have you be a part of something we are building here and if you would be willing to work with us and not fight for top dollar we can keep more of your teammates around longer and eventually be a better team”

  3. So as always you leave out the details like if he is seriously hurt or if his potential is never truly fulfilled (stays a RT) that this would be a great deal for him. Not to mention the security he receives from this deal. Nope, you just look at it as you can see the future & no matter what, he got the short end of the stick.

  4. Eagles kill it with player management if you ignore the Kelly years.

    But the man is Mickey Loomis, gm of the Whodats. Everybody talks about Drew Brees contract, but we keep veterans and add big fas. The OG cap Wizzard!

  5. That’s why you lost Sproles, Jenkins and Graham. You couldn’t afford them under the cap. Yep, Loomis is a genius.

  6. I think this is a great approach to signing players in the NFL these days. I am so glad Roseman is back running the show, especially with contracts.

  7. So they shouldn’t sign a player because they fear eventual acrimony? And he shouldn’t sign a new deal with a lot of guarenteed money in a sport rife with injuries because he may be underpaid in 2019? Uggh. Come on man.

  8. Or, he could blow out a knee in training camp this summer, never be the same player, and still collect the $35.5M guaranteed money. It’s all about risk/reward and $35.5 guaranteed is pretty good in today’s NFL, especially for a guy who has played slightly above average at right tackle, with a PED suspension mixed in, since being drafted #4 in 2013.

  9. Lane got 35MM guaranteed.
    Lets say that instead of making 63MM he could make 70MM over the same time by not taking this contract.
    But he runs the injury risk.
    Once you get 35MM guaranteed, what bad can happen to you? He could walk away from the game in a few years and have 20+MM after taxes.
    He wasn’t ripped off, he hedged his bets.
    35 MM now, and 28MM later
    or
    70MM later.

    I’ll take the former.

  10. My God… everyone is still starry-eyed about “contracts” that aren’t guaranteed.

    Florio: I offer you a $1B (one billion dollar) contract!!! With $10 guaranteed. Can’t wait to read about it tomorrow. No, please, don’t thank me. A $1,000,000,000 contract. Sign here! ____________________

  11. When it comes to some kinds of contracts, players don’t have much “choice.” However, when it comes to the extensions for young guys, they are making an informed decision to get paid now rather than later. They know that they possibly could make much more putting it off, but they could also have a career-ending injury or an erosion of skills before hitting big-time free agency. So, they are making sure they are set for life now and taking a risk that they might be “underpaid” at some point, while also taking the gamble they can get paid a lot now and still be good enough to have one more crack at a big payday.

  12. Smart contract for both sides. Always take that $35 million bird-in-hand.

    Barring injury he should still get one more decent contract in his career. Chances are he gets cut after year 4 of the new deal anyway. He’ll be a free agent at about 29.

    Or he could break his foot in the season opener, miss most of the season, need surgery and thank his lucky stars he banked that $35 mil.

  13. As of this current date, this extension ($10.5 million/year) would put Lane Johnson as the top paid RT by a margin of $3.75 million/year. As a LT, $10.5 million/year puts him as the 4th highest paid LT in the league.

    His guaranteed money ($35 million) is also the highest in the NFL for offensive lineman at any position.

    What’s the problem again?

    source: overthecap.com

  14. Smart to take what I imagine was a larger chunk of guaranteed money.

    Seeing NFL players can get cut at any time and see nothing, you have to focus on the real, “now” money.

  15. Boy, you were determined to find a way to drop a deuce on this contract. Some teams just can’t buy a break on this site. And I’m not even an Eagles fan.

    The contract is a win-win. The player is prevented from having to play out a rookie deal in which he DEFINITELY would have been underpaid and is protected from loss of income should he get injured during that rookie deal, and the team gets cost certainty at a very important position.

    Let it go.

  16. Seriously Florio? Ok a RIGHT tackle just signed a Deal that makes him the HIGHEST paid RT in the NFL. You are basically saying he got ripped off Bc the cap will rise and he will EVENTUALLY move over to LT when Peters is finished. A good contract for team and Lane. Highest paid player@ur Pos. Just a few yrs into the league without a ProBowl Ha….I’m sure after JP is done&Lanes@LT for a Yr or two, it’ll take 1-2 great or ProBowl season before its being reworked for top LT $. Mike why don’t you look@Contracts that N.E & Pitt give out to young up coming players, it’s called being smart. Unbelievable.

  17. Good for Lane Johnson.
    Not every player is concerned with making every possible penny.
    BTW ….How many articles can you do about one players contract?

  18. kingjoe1 says:
    Jan 29, 2016 8:11 PM
    Anyone who complains about 35 mm in gaurantees is a moron

    lukedunphysscienceproject says:
    Jan 29, 2016 10:24 PM

    Well then it’s a good thing no one did. Did you actually read the article?

    ———–

    Yes, he did. It suggests quite clearly that Lane will eventually be unhappy with (i.e., complain about) his 35 mill. Did YOU read it?

  19. as long as Howie isn’t in charge of doing the grocery shopping…just looking at the receipt tape at the register, making sure we got what we paid for and didn’t get overcharged.

  20. Typically speaking, that’s how these contracts work. When a player is still on his rookie deal and his team approaches him to sign a deal, of course it is “team friendly.” The player has two options: he can take the security and sign now, or take the risk for the big payday and sign later. The advantages and disadvantages are obvious. But the team is presenting the offer because it knows that if the player continues to perform at this rate, it will cost them more in the long run.

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