After cutting Eugene Monroe, Ravens’ site notes his marijuana advocacy

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Did the Ravens’ decision to release offensive tackle Eugene Monroe today have anything to do with his advocacy for the NFL allowing players to use marijuana? The Ravens aren’t saying so, although the article on their website announcing Monroe’s departure seems to be suggesting a link.

“Monroe had surgery to repair a torn labrum (shoulder) this offseason, and used the time off to become the first active NFL player to openly campaign for the use of medical marijuana. The Ravens did not rally behind the cause,” the Ravens’ website says.

After that, the Ravens’ site included a quote from head coach John Harbaugh, saying, “I promise you, he does not speak for the organization.”

When a player is cut, there are usually multiple reasons. In the case of Monroe, one reason is that he was due a $6.5 million salary this year. Another reason is that he has a history of injuries. Another is that the Ravens selected offensive tackle Ronnie Stanley with the sixth overall pick in the draft.

But it wouldn’t be surprising if Monroe’s advocacy of marijuana is one reason for his departure. NFL teams are image-conscious, and marijuana is a banned substance in the NFL.

If it is a part of the reason Monroe lost his job, that’s a shame. Players should be free to speak their minds on matters of public policy, and just because they’re not speaking for the organization, that doesn’t mean it should cost them their position within the organization.

72 responses to “After cutting Eugene Monroe, Ravens’ site notes his marijuana advocacy

  1. Not for nothing, but its a banned substance per the CBA, and for players on 26 teams, its a civil or criminal matter to use the stuff according to local law. For a team in a state where its not legalized, this is going to be a significant image problem.

  2. I smoke 2 joints in the morning

    I smoke 2 joints at night

    I smoke 2 joints in the afternoon

    It makes me feel alright…

  3. His advocacy had nothing to do with it, it was a financial decision based on productivity and staying on teh field.

  4. NFL teams feed players opioids that are similar to heroin to deal with pain from pro football but use of marijuana? Oh my God! We have a huge heroin epidemic that originated with people getting hooked on prescription drugs but his nos let’s not promote the evil marijuana! What should I expect from a league that only cares about its image.

  5. He was cut because he missed 15 games in 2 years.

    But still, thousands of players are using pharmaceutical pain killers. There should be more players advocating the natural stuff.

  6. If he actually help them win games they would not cut him just for saying what he said that doesn’t make sense.

    It is something else whether it be cap related or a failed drug test or something else. The point about how the NFL Advocates opiates rather than just adopting a pro marijuana policy is quite valid statistically speaking.

    That or somebody in the Ravens front office is very very old school in they’re thinking

  7. firerogergoodell says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:11 PM

    Legal in 26 states now! A majority of the United States.

    Not true. bad info. And btw: Illegal in every state by federal law, so hardly a good thing for a national organization to condone.

  8. Weed had zero influence on his getting cut. It’s the NFL, if he could of stayed on the field playing at a high level he could have been advocating cannibalism and they wouldn’t care.

  9. sloiggles says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:05 PM

    Queue dozens of people claiming “freedom of speech” without knowing a thing about it
    ————————

    Thanks for going first.

  10. I am against smoking pot, but I know I’m an oddity among most NFL fans . . .

    That being said, if all one has to do to keep earning $millions is to NOT smoke they have no reason to complain.

    Okay everybody, I’m done with my rant. Go ahead and take another hit and calm down.

  11. keyshawn22 says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:13 PM

    But Peyton can talk about drinking budweisers no problem… Doesn’t make sense
    —————————

    You sure don’t. What does one have to do with the other, and who is saying that Monroe can’t talk about marijuana?

  12. Try writing a post that goes against NBC’s stance on something. Then you’ll see how:

    “Players (employees) should be free to speak their minds on matters of public policy, and just because they’re not speaking for the organization, that doesn’t mean it should cost them their position within the organization.”

    really works…

  13. So the same organization that built a statue of Ray Lewis and defended Ray Rice cuts a guy because he advocates for medical marijuana? Okay, good. Glad you have your priorities in order.

  14. Lol, Harbough is a clown. Doesn’t he realize that a lot of players, and some on his team smoke weed? Thanks for the comments on opiod abuse too. I’d rather deal with a guy that smoked some weed over a belligerent drunk anyday of the week!

  15. There’s sources out there that Marlon Brown does pot every single day and that he’s mentioned that the whole team partakes in it. Some should look into the Ravens drug usage, they might find there’s a story here.

  16. davew128 says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:08 PM
    Not for nothing, but its a banned substance per the CBA, and for players on 26 teams, its a civil or criminal matter to use the stuff according to local law. For a team in a state where its not legalized, this is going to be a significant image problem.
    ===================

    Wrong! For players on 20 teams, they can either buy it recreationally or with a prescription, as there are 20 teams in the 25 states that have medical marijuana.

    And anything is a civil or criminal matter, by the way, making that sentence totally meaningless.

  17. Freedom of speech is a right we all possess. However, freedom from responsibility based on what you said isn’t a right. All employers evaluate potential employees on a number of factors. Don’t think so? Ever undergone a reference check or background check?

    He is allowed to have opinions that differ from NFL owners. But he doesn’t have a right to be employed by said NFL teams. Wisdom is knowing when to express your opinions and when to hold back.

  18. Queue all of the idiots who think he was actually cut because of this.

    Never mind that he was injury-proned, overpaid, and underperforming. Nope. None of that caused the Ravens to use their first rounder on his replacement.

  19. When the owners realize that the tax revenues from legalizing marywanna could build them all new stadiums with ease they will be advocates !

  20. Once you get big business out of the pockets of politicians, things will change.

    Quietly…
    Big Pharma lobbies against marijuana.
    Big Oil and Coal lobby against renewables and thorium reactors.
    Big Soda and the Sugar industry lobby against proposed FDA daily sugar allowances on food packaging. (a lot bigger deal than you think)
    The list goes on…

    Both sides of the isle get the money-it’s non partisan in that way, partisan against you and me. Change takes courage. Change takes time. Politicians have neither, and I am not talking about the dopey “Change” of Obama, his race politics and victimhood are tearing the country apart socially.

  21. What a load of crap.

    If he was the second coming of Walter Jones, he would be a Raven until retirement – with Harbaugh lighting up a victory doob for him after every victory.

    Reminds me of when Mike Hampton signed with the Rockies for $105M and cited the strength of the school system in Colorado as one of the deciding factors.

    It’s so sad that so many are allergic to the truth.

  22. Players free to speak their minds??? lol let’s see some really religious player come out against gay marriage and see what happens

  23. It’s only a matter of time before it is legal across the nation. If you want to stay stuck in the 1970s be my guest, but the rest of us forward thinkers are going to catch up with the times.

    Have a nice day.

  24. The broad support by commenters on this site in favor of legalized marijuana (medical or otherwise) is always astonishing, when taken into account the overwhelming pro-Republican commenters Vs. pro-Democrat commenters on other subjects in which politics can be interjected. The math just doesn’t add up. Has anyone else noticed that?

  25. patsbrat says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:10 PM
    I smoke 2 joints in the morning

    I smoke 2 joints at night

    I smoke 2 joints in the afternoon

    It makes me feel alright…

    ________________________________________

    Great for you. What a fine example for kids you are.

  26. iamedreed says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:24 PM
    Players free to speak their minds??? lol let’s see some really religious player come out against gay marriage and see what happens

    ________________________________________

    You are 100% correct.

  27. Since it makes you dumber and lazier I can understand why a billion dollar franchise might not be too excited about players using it.

  28. nyneal says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:41 PM
    iamedreed says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:24 PM
    Players free to speak their minds??? lol let’s see some really religious player come out against gay marriage and see what happens

    ________________________________________

    You are 100% correct.

    _______________________________________

    Extremely religious players say extremely stupid, evil things all the time…why would now be any different

  29. The Ravens are a few years away from being relevant again. Too bad by the time they become relevant again their QB will be on the way out and then being irrelevant really sets in. Just like Pittsburgh, once your QB retires things are going to go down hill quickly.

  30. nyneal says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:40 PM
    patsbrat says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:10 PM
    I smoke 2 joints in the morning

    I smoke 2 joints at night

    I smoke 2 joints in the afternoon

    It makes me feel alright…

    ________________________________________

    Great for you. What a fine example for kids you are.

    ______________________________

    Sublime song. Come on bro.

  31. We saw how quickly Laremy Tunsil fell in the draft after his BONG video surfaced… but really, wouldn’t you say at least 50% of NFL’ers roll some joints?

  32. Good luck Eugene. I too would rather have players smoke weed than turn into prescription junkies (oh that’s right, being a prescription junkie is legal). And we wonder why there is a heroin epidemic in the US. It’s not because of weed!

  33. nyneal says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:40 PM

    Great for you. What a fine example for kids you are.
    ———————–

    If you are looking to the PFT comment section for role models for your kids, pot is the least of your concerns.

  34. My 11 yr old Son is a lefty pitcher, 1st basemen.. My son was on the mound one nite, Took a line drive off his knee, it blew up. Took him to the ER after the game, bruised knee cap. No problem! And a script for 25 vicodin.. I looked at my wife blown away.. My son did just fine with advil. That was just over a month ago.. Where does it start??

  35. It is a terribel trend that employees of any company have their rights taken away. The image excuse is weak and until someone who has the money to take a case to the supreme court, the trend will continue. Any company who takes away peoples civil rights should be fined and open for officer prosecution.

  36. Can we cut out the medical hippy lettuce talk? This is just a smoke screen for the real issue: he couldn’t stay healthy.

    Face it – If he played with the intensity, strength, courage, and professionalism of a Jonathan Ogden, he’d have a job for life even while he pursued his medical cannabis crusade. He was cut because he was a finesse tackle who was always getting hurt. He missed 15 games over the past two years.

    Worst Ravens free agent signing E-V-E-R.

  37. “That being said, if all one has to do to keep earning $millions is to NOT smoke they have no reason to complain.”

    Why? What’s your problem?

  38. An unecessary cheap shot and a stupid thing not to support. If marijuana could help these guys medically for their injuries why not let them use it instead of cycles of painkillers:

  39. bannedfromchoirpractice says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:39 PM

    The broad support by commenters on this site in favor of legalized marijuana (medical or otherwise) is always astonishing, when taken into account the overwhelming pro-Republican commenters Vs. pro-Democrat commenters on other subjects in which politics can be interjected. The math just doesn’t add up. Has anyone else noticed that?
    ——
    The #1 natural law governing internet commenting is that people generally complain instead of complimenting. The #2 rule is that people comment on things they truly care about…I doubt that the right-wing proponents are from the same people that are pro-weed.

    That being said, do you really think only Democrats smoke weed? If so you have no clue. I have a friend that got busted with an ounce of weed at customs. He told me the story in his office, surrounded by framed photographs of himself with every Republican president since Ford.

  40. bannedfromchoirpractice says:
    Jun 15, 2016 7:39 PM

    The broad support by commenters on this site in favor of legalized marijuana (medical or otherwise) is always astonishing, when taken into account the overwhelming pro-Republican commenters Vs. pro-Democrat commenters on other subjects in which politics can be interjected. The math just doesn’t add up. Has anyone else noticed that?

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I wouldn’t describe the tone here as strictly Republican or Democrat. Its a bit more nuanced than that.

    Generally (and I do mean generally), commenters on this sight espouse personal accountability and the right to make decisions for themselves, without interference from others.

    That explains the following trends espoused here regularly: Weed should be legal; team names are the teams business; you signed a contract so honor it; teams should pay for their own stadiums; etc.

    Again, very broad brush strokes, but you get the idea.

  41. Jeremy Newberry started 107 NFL games as an offensive lineman.

    To curb the pain that comes with the sport, Newberry became dependent on painkillers and is suffering from stage three kidney failure.

    Obviously I am far from an expert but what harm can one joint cause compared to these dangerous pills that nobody truly knows what it’s made of?

  42. Or perhaps its because he was due 6.5 million dollars and he had only played in 17 of the last 34 games, and is getting older.

  43. The player sucks. He missed more games then played and when he played he wasn’t good or average.Not the best platform or track record to be an advocate.

    The legality issue also misses the point. Booze is legal and many players use it to unwind as does the public. However many can’t handle it and end up in trouble over misuse or abuse. Examples being Justin Blackmon and Aquib Talib.

    The player was cut because he sucked and wasn’t traded because he sucked. I am not talking about sucking on a bong, he sucked on the field of play.

  44. The NFL, and the Ravens, would have supported him if he was an advocate for OPIUM-based pain pills. You know, the kind the NFL dispenses by the handful

    In the NFL’s mind: OPIUM > MARIJUANA

  45. It’s hilarious everytime somebody tries to explain that freedom of speech means the govt can’t censor or retaliate against the speaker….We know that’s what freedom of speech is about dummies!

    What freedom of speech advocates want is an extension of the definition for freedom of speech…for instance we know Curt Shilling lost his job because he’s against men and women using the same bathroom together, but what if another employee who supports the right for Men and Women to use the same bathroom was fired for being outspoken about it? Technically that could happen too, since anybody could get fired at any time for something they said….

    C’mon PFT Nation, are you gon sit here and say you wouldn’t be upset if someone lost their job because they openly supported transgender rights?

  46. What a stooge Harbaugh is. One of those fools who sees football as a religion and whose horizons don’t extend beyond the stupid, macho, world his lunkheads father lived in.

  47. jag1959 says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:27 PM
    Weed had zero influence on his getting cut. It’s the NFL, if he could of stayed on the field playing at a high level he could have been advocating cannibalism and they wouldn’t care.

    ———–

    Exactly.

    I have seen quotes from GM’s that say that they are well aware that they thing upwards of 70% of their players smoke weed, and we are not talking medical. It’s just the ones that are dumb enough to get caught they have issue with.

  48. Look, folks, in America (and for the NFL) it’s always about money. Marijuana is popular because it has many benefits (Monroe is right) and it’s cheap to grow, so its legalization will hurt the profits of the alcohol and drug industries. Those industries send lots of advertising dollars to the NFL. So, the NFL and the alcohol and drug industries will continue to fight the legalization of marijuana.

  49. Pete Carroll is a 9/11 truther says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:57 PM
    davew128 says:
    Jun 15, 2016 6:08 PM
    Not for nothing, but its a banned substance per the CBA, and for players on 26 teams, its a civil or criminal matter to use the stuff according to local law. For a team in a state where its not legalized, this is going to be a significant image problem.
    ===================

    Wrong! For players on 20 teams, they can either buy it recreationally or with a prescription, as there are 20 teams in the 25 states that have medical marijuana.

    And anything is a civil or criminal matter, by the way, making that sentence totally meaningless.
    ===================
    The only meaningless thing here is you. Its a federal controlled substance, or had you forgotten? That means for 32 teams in 25 states its still a federal crime.

  50. Regarding the Republican vs. Democrat thing, the people that probably most influenced my views on drug legalization were actually very conservative Republicans and Libertarians (on the right spectrum of the libertarian world).

    Many Republican judges and sheriffs, as well as other law enforcement support the legalization of marijuana, and many all drugs.

    The reasons vary, but principled (IMHO) conservatives tend to want the feds to stay out of it and know that prohibition actually creates and increases crime and violence. There’s also the idea of limited government and wasting resources that could be prioritized elsewhere.

    This is one issue where I think most philosophically consistent conservatives and liberals should agree.

    I consider myself a very liberal person who arrived here via conservative thinkers.

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