ESPN employee rips Tim Tebow’s baseball skills

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Keith Law apparently didn’t get the memo.

At a time when ESPN has worked hard to build up the baseball chops of football-player-turned-ESPN-employee-turned-would-be-baseball-player Tim Tebow, one ESPN employee who specializes in assessing baseball talent has courageously pointed out that Tebow has none.

ESPN senior writer Keith Law has penned a scathing assessment of Tebow for ESPN’s paywall-protected “Insider” site. (Unlike PFT, the folks at Barstool Sports aren’t too cheap to purchase access. Or, unlike PFT, the folks at Barstool Sports haven’t forgotten the password they “borrowed” from a friend.)

Tim Tebow is in the Arizona Fall League,” Law writes. “He might be better suited to playing in an Arizona high school league. His presence here is a farce, and he looks like an imposter pretending to have talent he does not possess.”

There’s more.

“Tebow the baseball player is not a baseball player; he’s a washed-up quarterback who has size and nothing else,” Law explains. “His swing is long, and he wields the bat like someone who hasn’t played the sport in more than a decade, which he hasn’t. He can’t catch up to 90 mph, which is well below the major league average for a fastball, and was cutting through fastballs in the zone on Wednesday night. He rolled over twice on fastballs, which is something you generally see professional hitters do only on off-speed stuff, and he showed below-average running speed. In left field, his routes look like those of a wide receiver, although he managed to eventually make his way around to a fly ball in left.

“In short, there’s absolutely no baseball justification for Tebow to be here.”

There’s no baseball justification, but there’s plenty of business justification. Tebow is selling merchandise, representing his new apparel partner (Adidas), and creating buzz for the Arizona Fall League.

Of course, he’s also occupying a roster spot that otherwise would be filled by someone with actual talent and potential. Which isn’t nearly as sad as the spectacle of a grown man who doesn’t have it and never will going through the motions of chasing an unreachable dream at a time when anyone else who gets it knows he has no chance of getting there.

Unless, that is, the same business considerations that got Tebow to the Arizona Fall League will continue to push him through the baseball pipeline, artificially elevating his status in the name of making money.

31 responses to “ESPN employee rips Tim Tebow’s baseball skills

  1. Ouch…. Tebow is just trying to cash in on his brand like anybody else would love to do if they could. If the league is willing to pay him and he’s willing to show up to work, then maybe everybody should chill and cut the guy some slack.

  2. Imagine if for laughs the Mets called him up to the majors next season…

    Picture if you will, Tebow is walked to first, a runner in scoring position steals home from third and the Mets pitcher throws a no hitter for the team to win 1-0. Tebow of course would receive all of the post game attention, at least from ESPN.

    And here is the thing – would this be any different from his NFL career?

  3. ESPN still gives Tebow baseball updates on football shows like NFL Insiders and NFL Live. The execs will not appreciate this bit of honesty, lol.

  4. He is no longer a football player, so we don’t care nothing about him. This belongs to Hardball.

  5. Tebow’s afternoon took an intense turn after the game when a man standing in a crush of fans seeking autographs along the third-base line collapsed and appeared to have a seizure. Tebow stopped signing and cautiously made his way over to where people had gathered. He sat on the concrete retaining wall that separates the field from the first row of seats and prayed silently as a medic in a Bryce Harper T-shirt and a Detroit Tigers baseball cap tended to the man.

    As the man was slowly coming to, Tebow leaned over and placed his right hand on the man’s left knee while Daniel Kelly, a former Jets scout who left football to become a debt counselor and minister, prayed out loud. Kelly, who was wearing a Mets Tebow jersey, attended the game with his wife, Samantha, to celebrate his 43rd birthday, and had been seated next to the fan who collapsed.

    As the man regained his bearings, Tebow engaged him in conversation while waiting for paramedics from the Phoenix Fire Department to arrive. The man had dropped a baseball as he collapsed and it was near the crook of his arm as he lay on his right side with his head resting on a black backpack. Tebow leaned over, picked up the ball and signed it. He returned it to him saying, “I signed it for you if you want it.” He also took off the gray sweat bands that he had on each wrist, signed them and gave them to the man.

    Why not instead of ripping Tim Tebow every chance you get, why don’t you talk about this? Oh, because it’s a positive story, right? And, if this is strictly a pro FOOTBALL talk, why are you commenting on a baseball player? You will do anything you can to try to bash a good dude. Jealous much?

  6. In other words, Tebow is a joke in any sport. Don’t try to tell that to the Tebowites unless you want to generate a firestorm of protest. Oh, wait… I guess that’s the point, just business as usual.

  7. I noticed a few days ago that Tebow, following a minor league baseball game, assisted a man who had suffered a seizure, and that PFT was silent about this incident.

    It made sense, since this was a story about baseball, and Tebow doesn’t play football anymore. This is supposedly a football site (though given the liberal slant of most of the writers here, and their desire to post about social issues, that is debatable).

    It made sense….until I saw this story. The irresistible desire to criticize Tebow at every turn knows no bounds with the sports media.

    The desire to jump on this man when he’s down, and humiliate him is astounding and inexplicable. It compares favorably to Captain Ahab’s desire to destroy Moby Dick, though Ahab had a reason for his hatred, having lost a leg to the whale. The sports media’s desire to destroy Tebow has less a basis for foundation, but is no less based in hatred.

    Think about it: this article is dripping with glee at Tebow’s failed efforts to play baseball. That says more about the author and those who share his glee than it will ever say about Tebow.

  8. If Tebow was a black transgender Muslim he would be described as “courageous ” and “following his dreams”. White heterosexual Christians don’t get that treatment on BSPN.

  9. Ouch…. Tebow is just trying to cash in on his brand like anybody else would love to do if they could.

    He could play in the NFL today if he ever dropped his dogged insistence to only be a quarterback. But he won’t.

    He could show total commitment to his minor league work by taking a hiatus from his ESPN gig. But he won’t.

    Everyone loves to characterize Tebow as this selfless, infallibly pious dude. Look at the facts — he’s selfish.

  10. IS THIS Hardball Talk Now???? who cares, I have never heard of Keith Law. If someone is willing to let any player play a sport, whatever the reason is, Talent, filling seats, etc. let it be. Who cares more power to them. Is Tebow talented? I personally don’t think so, but he seems like an alight guy and we are quicker to throw stones at him rather than all the athletes failing drug tests, getting arrested and acting like complete fools on sidelines all over the place. But again why is this on PFT? Tebow is no longer a Football player.

  11. fwippel says:
    Oct 14, 2016 5:00 PM

    I noticed a few days ago that Tebow, following a minor league baseball game, assisted a man who had suffered a seizure, and that PFT was silent about this incident.

    It made sense, since this was a story about baseball, and Tebow doesn’t play football anymore. This is supposedly a football site (though given the liberal slant of most of the writers here, and their desire to post about social issues, that is debatable).

    It made sense….until I saw this story. The irresistible desire to criticize Tebow at every turn knows no bounds with the sports media.
    ————————————-
    You missed the point of the story, Florio isn’t ripping Tebow, he’s ripping ESPN. They take any opportunity they can to rip ESPN, and more power to them for it, they know how many of us hate ESPN, too.

  12. Keith Law is universally considered a joke and a blowhard. He never played the game and his opinions about players and organizations are useless. It’s hilarious that your hatred for Tebow and ESPN aligned perfectly here. Kudos PFT! Or as most call you now…TMZ Sports.

  13. Having abandoned ESPN long ago I had to Google a picture of this writer. This kind of “smear” journalism is now in vogue. I have not found anything to make me believe Mr. Keith Law has the ability or expertise to offer up these kinds of baseball scouting insight. It’s new popular for journalists to offer up soc called expert analysis of an athletes ability in baseball or hockey or football or whatever. Sorry Mr. Law, when the Mets say he isn’t a baseball prospect, I don’t know where you get the scouting ability to make the statement “He might be better suited to playing in an Arizona high school league. His presence here is a farce, and he looks like an imposter pretending to have talent he does not possess.”

  14. Sorry, Florio, the Tebowites must have moved over to HBT, you’re not gonna get them back this way.

  15. Problem with Tebow was he was too prideful to realize he’s not a qb but could be great elsewhere on the field. So now he’s to prideful to admit that he’s not gonna cut it in MLB. Every action he has done has been a 180 on his faith. I wouldn’t want my children to be like him

  16. He should have tried out for the CFL and proven himself that way, if in fact he could. Many players have done it, but it takes swallowing pride to do that, and not to take up an actual spot that a potential real baseball player could occupy, simply because his name garnered him this publicity stunt/ false opportunity.

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