Ex-NFL player Myron Rolle chosen for Harvard neurosurgery residency

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Myron Rolle’s NFL career didn’t last long, but he always made clear that he had higher priorities than playing football, and he’s just taken a major step in his real calling.

Rolle, a 2010 sixth-round pick of the Titans who also spent time with the Steelers, has been chosen for a neurosurgery residency at Harvard after he completes his education at the Florida State University College of Medicine this spring.

Seven years of neurosurgery is a big deal, something I wanted for a long time, really excited about it. Today is just great, it’s remarkable,” Rolle told WCTV.

Rolle was a star player at Florida State who once arrived late to a game because he had an interview for a Rhodes Scholarship. He spent a year studying at Oxford between the end of his Florida State career and the start of his NFL career, and although he spent a couple years in the NFL, his primary goal was to become a doctor.

“Saving lives and helping people live a better life,” Rolle said, “that’s going to make life worth living.”

51 responses to “Ex-NFL player Myron Rolle chosen for Harvard neurosurgery residency

  1. It’s nice to read stories like this.

    Good to know that not every athlete is betting on professional sports as their career, and that not every D1 school is just a semi pro football organization.

  2. “Saving lives and helping people live a better life,” Rolle said, “that’s going to make life worth living.”

    Take note, 95% of NFL players. This is how to live a life that isn’t one of utter degeneracy.

  3. Ah, for once a refreshing story on PFT.

    Well done young man.

    You used your football scholly to cover your undergrad and most likely his cup of tea in the pros covered all his medical school expenses with some left over.

  4. “Saving lives and helping people live a better life,” Rolle said, “that’s going to make life worth living.”

    Take note, 95% of NFL players. This is how to live a life that isn’t one of utter degeneracy.
    ———————————————————————

    Actually, that’s good advice for all of us. While we can’t all be neurosurgeons, we call all help someone else live a better life. Congrats Mr. Rolle.

  5. That is just outstanding! Too many times we read stories of former players who fall the other way, not doing anything of note after football. This young man is a true role model. Kudos to him for following his dreams!

  6. Sounds like a real life Moonlight Graham. Graham never made it to the plate. Rolle got to play two years of NFL football.

    Ray Kinsella: Fifty years ago, for five minutes you came within… y-you came this close. It would KILL some men to get so close to their dream and not touch it. God, they’d consider it a tragedy.

    Dr. Archibald “Moonlight” Graham: Son, if I’d only gotten to be a doctor for five minutes… now that would have been a tragedy.

  7. Not the best neurosurgery residency out there, hope he will eventually be able to get into a good fellowship program somewhere and pass his boards.

  8. This is why teams shouldn’t waste draft picks on players not 100% committed to football. Doesn’t make a difference if it’s hip hop or medicine. The NFL isn’t for players not totally committed to it. You can’t succeed in this league without it.

    It’s actually not a good role model for players who aren’t geniuses and are not committed to football. Most players won’t have the financial future of neurosurgery. Players who want the most financial security from football need to dedicate themselves 100% or they will have a short career like Rolle did and lose out on the financial security that an NFL career brings.

    So if you want the financial rewards of a long NFL career, you better commit yourself entirely to it and give up the side stuff or you will have a short career and hope you have neurosurgery to fall back on.

  9. mcnabbster says:
    Mar 18, 2017 12:04 PM
    This is why teams shouldn’t waste draft picks on players not 100% committed to football. Doesn’t make a difference if it’s hip hop or medicine. The NFL isn’t for players not totally committed to it. You can’t succeed in this league without it.

    It’s actually not a good role model for players who aren’t geniuses and are not committed to football. Most players won’t have the financial future of neurosurgery. Players who want the most financial security from football need to dedicate themselves 100% or they will have a short career like Rolle did and lose out on the financial security that an NFL career brings.

    So if you want the financial rewards of a long NFL career, you better commit yourself entirely to it and give up the side stuff or you will have a short career and hope you have neurosurgery to fall back on.
    —–
    While I get and agree with your point from an NFL management side, you can’t be more wrong from Rolle’s side. He never wanted to have a long NFL career, you said it yourself. This young man used football to basically get a free(scholarship) education at Florida St and then used the NFL to make some money to help pay for some Med school. Seems like he’s got his head in pretty straight.

    You’re right in that anything you choose to do, you will be better at if you give it 100%, but what he wants to do requires money and time and saving lives for a living seems like a pretty cool thing to strive for as a career

  10. “Saving lives and helping people live a better life,” Rolle said, “that’s going to make life worth living.”

    I wish every article pointed in this direction for humanity.

    Ezekiel Elliiott, get some writing tools and take notes.

  11. I’m not an FSU fan but it’s hard not to read this story and not be a fan of this guy. This guy is a REAL role model.

  12. He chose between being a DB in the NFL and being a nuerosurgeon.

    I’m sitting here trying to decide if I can wear my jeans one more time without washing them.

    We’ve both got some big things going on

  13. Nice to see a former player become a brain surgeon.

    We know there are no brain surgeons at 345 Park Ave.

  14. The average career expectancy of a 6th round pick is 4 years.
    Rolle played for 2.

    If you remove the anomalies that last longer than the overall average of all draft picks, that expectancy for 6th rounders gets pushed down lower than 3 years.

    Rolle was able to play well enough to get 2 full years, protect his hands and his head well enough to continue a career in medicine as a neurosurgeon in the process and gave the Tennessee Titans exactly what they expected from him.

    This WAS NOT a wasted draft pick and anyone that thinks it was is not paying attention.

    Good for you, Mr. Rolle….Congratulations and good luck.

  15. Good hands, sharp cuts, great knowledge of the field –
    Mr Rolle has all the tools to be a great Surgeon.

    Good luck to you Sir, and thank for you setting
    an example worthy of following.

  16. Which is exactly why it’s important it takes a special kind of stupid to suggest that the NFL admit athletes after completing high school. These kids need something to fall back on with such a short average career, and they are far less likely to go back to school after turning pro.

  17. Why is their no mention that this man was a Rhodes scholar in 2008?… This isn’t shocking at all…

  18. It’s mind boggling to see people give a thumbs down to such a positive story. It just reminds you that there are people out there that are just negative and no matter what anyone does they are never satisfied.

  19. Living in Cincinnati, this story would never have seen the light of day without PFT. The next time some Bungles fan starts with the “all Steelers are stupid, all Steelers are criminals” malarkey, I’ll be happy to throw this one at them.

    “A Steeler just retired from the NFL to go to Harvard and become a neurosurgeon. That’s really stupid and criminal in my book. What say you now?”

  20. “”blackula72 says:
    Mar 18, 2017 4:40 PM

    It’s mind boggling to see people give a thumbs down to such a positive story. It just reminds you that there are people out there that are just negative and no matter what anyone does they are never satisfied.””

    It won’t tell us but, I would be willing to bet that ones that are giving the thumbs down are people that think it’s wrong of professional players to want to better themselves. They should be openly willing to perform on command for their entertainment.

  21. Meh! What’s the big deal? Its not like its rocket science or brain surgery!

    OH! OOPS! NEVER MIND!

    Congratulations and best of luck!

  22. That’s impressive. Scary to think he wasn’t even the smartest person on the Steelers.

  23. Not surprised an NFL alum got into Harvard. More surprised and FSU alum did.

    Go Gators!

    notice he used and instead of an…..hes certainly a florida gator

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