“Egregious” hits more likely to result in suspensions than ejections

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Introduced as a measure that will result in more ejections or suspensions, the reality is that the NFL’s new emphasis on eliminating certain “egregious” hits from the game will lead to enhanced suspensions.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the point of emphasis will apply to suspending the player who commits an egregious hit, even if it’s only a first offense. Game officials retain the ability to eject players for flagrant hits, but the Competition Committee prefers that suspensions be used instead, since mistakes will be less likely if the decision is made after a given game. A split-second decision by an official during a game is more likely to be wrong.

Also, the source said replay review will not be available to determine whether a hit was or wasn’t egregious. This will make officials even less likely to throw a player out for a hit that can be addressed by the league office after the game.

It’s a smart approach, given that officials already prefer not to eject players, for fear of impacting the outcome of the game. Focusing on suspensions permits for a more deliberate approach by everyone involved — and it also gives the player who is suspended a fair chance to appeal the process.

8 responses to ““Egregious” hits more likely to result in suspensions than ejections

  1. As a long time Miami fan I want to know if egregious hits will include ‘inadvertent’ stomping. If so that could be problematic

  2. As a long time Miami fan I want to know if egregious hits will include ‘inadvertent’ stomping. If so that could be problematic

  3. I like this idea. In some cases it’s very obvious the hit was meant to be a “take out” hit. Don’t put the pressure on game officials. They can’t catch every angle. Let the NFL offices look at it and make a decision.
    The NCAA has been miles ahead of the NFL on replay and penalty rule changes. And most of them make better sense than the bullheaded NFL rules committee. Why replay wasn’t changed years ago is baffling to me. Especially seeing how quickly and with accuracy the NCAA has been doing it for several years already. I can see the NCAA targeting rule being adopted by the NFL. Most likely their own version of it but it’s better than carting guys off on stretchers.

  4. I never understood the whole position of “We don’t want to impact the outcome of the game” when it comes to ejecting players. If you eject the player, you affect the team the player is on. If you don’t eject the player, you affect the team the player is not on. Either way, somebody’s getting affected by the ref.

  5. since mistakes will be less likely if the decision is made after a given game

    What decisions enforced after the games were you watching last year?

  6. I’m still not buying it. The first time someone gets suspended for clubbing Cam Newton in the head multiple times while he’s standing in the pocket, then I’ll believe it. I will not be holding my breath.

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