Report: Aaron Hernandez planned suicide “for weeks”

AP

The death of former Patriots tight end Aaron Hernandez was ruled a suicide only one day after it happened. A major international publication now claims that Hernandez had intended to take his own life for an extended period of time.

According to the Daily Mail, “Hernandez was planning his suicide for weeks.” Per the report, Hernandez had given “most of his personal belongings to fellow inmates and covered the floor of his cell in soap,” so that he wouldn’t be able to save himself if he decided to abort the hanging.

Also, three different notes were found in Hernandez’s cell. (It had previously been reported that there was no note.)

These facts make it even more reasonable to ask questions regarding whether the authorities at the prison knew or should have known that Hernandez was suicidal. As mentioned Wednesday, the suicide rate for prisoners in Massachusetts was nearly double the national average for the period of 2001 through 2012. The situation prompted the Massachusetts Legislature to commission a study earlier this year aimed at better preventing inmate suicides.

107 responses to “Report: Aaron Hernandez planned suicide “for weeks”

  1. Why would he commit suicide in the middle of an appeal. He had a good lawyer and beat the double murder just recently. He might had a 50/50 shot of being free. The whole thing sounds fishy. Dude probably was murdered.

  2. I am not a conspiracy type of person, but this is starting to stink. First there was no note, now there are 3 notes. Then it was no one knew Aaron was suicidal and now everyone knew since he was giving all his property away. Then it was family wants to donate brain but medical examiner say no. Seriously, nothing looks shady here at all.

  3. Florio, why aren’t you mentioning that Baez probably brought these issues to Hernandez’s attention in the normal attorney/client privileged discussions that take place?

  4. Stop. Just stop. Trying to place blame on the prison, the system or anywhere else is just wrong. Are we now placing the responsibility of reading someone else’s mind on the prison guards?

    Aaron Hernandez is the only one to blame.

    Just. Stop.

  5. If a death row inmate decides to take his or her own life, I got no problem with it. I believe they will go to a very hot place for what they did, and if they want to take the Express, then it saves the taxpayers a lot of money in incarceration costs.

  6. This whole story should be the final day’s case study at NFL Rookie symposium.

    What a waste

  7. Since you openly admit you don’t have a real job, maybe you’d like to take a job as a corrections officers for a few months and let us know the reasonableness of whether or not prison staff is or should be aware of every inmates thoughts and/or intentions. Plus, I’m sure you’d appreciate the $38,000 a year for your efforts.

  8. He’d never do it!
    It’s all a cover up!

    Comments of morons.
    Doing life without parole can break anyone.

  9. “Major” – and yes, by one metric it’s the most read news site on the planet – but not necessarily accurate. So take it with a grain of salt.

    But if true, the people who oversaw his cell block and their supervisors should be fired, at the very least.

  10. “I doubt they’ll kick up any fuss. Not for an old crook like me”

    -Shawshank Redemption

    They should have known, they probably did know, but no one in the prison system is going to do a thing about it.

    American prisons are about a timeout from society, not rehabilitation. The mental and physical health of inmates is something people don’t care about and if you raised taxes to pay for inmates to have better access to medical professionals, people would bitch about how inmates have better healthcare than people who are free.

    Yes it’s an issue, but barring massive social change for most Americans it’s a cost of doing business.

  11. As mentioned Wednesday, the suicide rate for prisoners in Massachusetts was nearly double the national average for the period of 2001 through 2012. The situation prompted the Massachusetts Legislature to commission a study earlier this year aimed at better preventing inmate suicides.

    ==================================

    maybe they ought to change the fact that a murder conviction can be overturned w a suicide, and that rate might drop. just a thought….

  12. Also posted on Wednesday was an article where you quoted everyone from his family to his friends to his lawyer that they had all recently spoken to him and that he had given no signs whatsoever that he was contemplating suicide.

    If none of these people, who knew Hernandez intimately for most of his life, could detect the fact that he was about to kill himself why would you expect an overworked staff with literally thousands of inmates to worry about to detect it?

    And not for nothing, but relying on an article from the London Daily Mail and their “well placed source” (because of course- why wouldn’t a newspaper in England have a well placed source in the Massachusetts prison system) is not exactly responsible.

  13. Diehard pats fan from Mass, I only hope his daughter becomes a strong law abiding woman unlike her father. She will grow up fatherless, but I hope it makes her stronger as a person. He probably asked his attorneys or other inmates how can his daughter get any money and this was the “solution.”

  14. The man was evil. The victims and tragedy here are his victims, their families and his fiancee and daughter.
    Stop giving this story attention.

  15. Alot of rumors and speculation surrounding this suicide, so is there any truth to his suicide essentially clears him from the murder in the eyes of the courts which will then make his contract with Patriots valid and they now have to pay his estate the remainder?

  16. Another sad story. He had the world by the tail and threw it all away. He was broke and had nothing left. He probably couldn’t even afford the appeal with Baez. If he spent all that time covering his cell with soap. Someone should have seen that on the cameras. Something is fishy in Massachusetts prisons. Guards turning a blind eye. Very sad for his daughter.

  17. Honestly who cares if the guards “Could have done more”

    Any investigation on this is a waste of time and money. He’s dead. Its over. Let this man be forgotten

  18. He planned the whole thing to set his family up financially for life. He was found not guilty during the most recent trial and the next day he starts the appeal process of his prior conviction, commits suicide, and boom, his conviction is off the books and his estate remains intact. Not to mention the now very slim chance that the victims’ families would have winning a lawsuit against his estate.

    It’s a devious master plan.

  19. And not for nothing, but the people who saying this was not a suicide are the same people who believed he was innocent. Not exactly a MESNA group there.

  20. Liberals want to treat criminals better than law-abiding citizens. Just like they care more about the religious rights of our enemies than they do about the religious rights of US citizens

  21. It is the NFL offseason folks, there isn’t much news so this is what we get. Personally I’d rather read more about what players are doing in the offseason. Who’s working out, with who, doing charity, volunteering, etc. Something else please.

  22. They always seem to use bed sheets, why not make them perforated? That way they just rip. To me it seems cheap and affective.

  23. cincy85 says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:39 AM
    They always seem to use bed sheets, why not make them perforated? That way they just rip. To me it seems cheap and affective.

    __________________

    And why would you do that? He did the world and the taxpayers a favor.

  24. The victims’ families can still file wrongful death suits in civil court. You don’t need a guilty verdict in criminal trial for a civil case. See OJ Simpson for an example.

  25. “Assisted suicide should be an option for inmates serving life without parole, in my opinion.”

    Best comment by far. Imagine of 50,000 of the 2.2M people in jail took their own lives. At a cost of $60,000 per inmate per year, the total savings would be 3 Billion annually! Now obviously, that number would be revolving as we don’t know how long each inmate would have lived until and we also don’t know how many future inmates will choose this path.

    I wouldn’t eliminate any of the jobs of social workers, COs, staff, health professionals working in and around the prisons either. They’re all heavily understaffed so lessening the numbers on the inside will allow better care, attention to those that remain. So, in this case, allowing assisted suicide would NOT have a negative effect on society.

  26. Not to sound cruel, but is suicide by prison lifers really a tragedy or even an issue?

    Saves the state money, gives the victims families some sort of closure and gives the offender one final selfish act before they go.

  27. lordliftedme says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:44 AM

    How does covering the floor with soap not save you? Seriously, curious.
    _________________
    Once you are hanging and have slid down toward the floor, the soap makes it difficult for you to stand up to release the tension around your neck (it also slows people down coming in to save you should they see you strangling).

  28. cincy85 says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:39 AM

    They always seem to use bed sheets, why not make them perforated? That way they just rip. To me it seems cheap and affective.
    _______________________
    You can weave anything into a rope.

    Cheaper solutions is simply to have better monitoring by correctional staff.

  29. lordliftedme says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:44 AM
    How does covering the floor with soap not save you? Seriously, curious.
    =========================
    I’m guessing so you can’t get your footing to undo the noose.

  30. lukarwarrior says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:01 AM

    Even Wikipedia doesn’t accept the Daily Mail as a valid source.
    ____________________
    Whatever those in power tell you not to listen to is what you should consider as being truthful.

    Does wikipedia still consider the NYTimes as a valid source after their recent #faknews Pats story?

  31. lordliftedme says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:44 AM

    How does covering the floor with soap not save you? Seriously, curious.
    ———————————————————-
    When hanging yourself in prison, there is nothing on the ceiling to tie anything to, so the inmate ties his belt, bed sheet, whatever to the bars on the window and throws his body weight away from the window. I’m guessing that Hernandez made the floor slippery so that he wouldn’t be able to regain his balance if he had a change of heart.

  32. Didn’t plan it soon enough as far as I’m concerned…. Makes you wonder how many other people he killed or tried to….

  33. thrifty says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:58 AM
    pats’ fans must be so proud
    ———-
    Of the 5 Super Bowl rings you bet….

  34. It’s sad the seemingly most hurtful and wasteful people get the most press. In other news there are players doing community service, donating time and money, creating and supporting charities and this is the coverage we as the public receive.

    The media is a sad, distasteful hoard.

  35. Why y’all care so much about a guy who murdered someone I’ll never know.
    We all KNOW he was involved in the double murder as well.
    He was a bad man
    He had the world by the tail, but ego and anger won the day…shoot most of this over someone bumping into him and spilling his drink….come on he asked for all of this.
    Hope I don’t see another printed word about this fool. Stop reading and supporting people like him.
    Personally this is my last read of any story to do with him…the world is a better place with him gone.

  36. At the risk of getting too philosophical on a sports forum or sounding draconian (lord knows the cavemen on PFT don’t need help being more draconian)… but should sanctioned suicide be allowed for convicted lifers with no chance of parole? I mean, does anyone see this a great loss or injustice?

  37. Of course he planned it. By beating the 2nd murder trial and his death will now toss his other murder convition since it was being appealed, His family is now shielded from any civil suits. Also his family will now likely sue the Patriots over the unpaid bonus money. I for one hope the Pat’s stick to their guns about that and hopefully this stupid law gets overturned. His scumbag lawyer is likely to sue the prison and they are also sending his brain to be studied for CTE which they will then sue the NFL as well. What a wonderful world we live in where murderers are given the benefit of the doubt by our justice system and the victims families are screwed over.

  38. Della Street says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:35 AM
    And not for nothing, but the people who saying this was not a suicide are the same people who believed he was innocent. Not exactly a MESNA group there.
    *********************
    I’m willing to bet they are likely to spell MENSA correctly though. It’s like there are too many letters to mess up…

  39. “He did it to ensure his family’s financial future is my best guess: insurance money or NFL contract money, most likely.”

    Insurance doesn’t pay when you commit suicide.

    However since this now voids the original murder conviction his estate can go after the Pats for the millions they withheld from him after he was arrested.

    Hopefully if they get that blood money a good chunk of it goes to Lloyds family and those of the other 2.

  40. After 4 years of the media making money off of this story, pumping it almost daily, good riddance.

    We live in such a despicable country.

    Anything for the almighty dollar.

    Any update on Jovan Belcher’s suicide from 5 years ago?

    Just curious why that didn’t get any coverage.

  41. Conspiracy theorists need to relax. He was never winning that appeal. The judge in the first trial bent over for the defense and kept out a lot of damning evidence. Once the jury found him guilty, the conviction was bullet proof.

    This is a guy who knew he was never walking out of that cell and decided he’d rather be dead than rot there for 50-60 years. You cannot murder a 6’2, 245 lb, 27 year old former NFL tight end without signs of a struggle.

    Most suicidal people do not advertise their intentions to loved ones because they know they will try to stop them. They also often have irrational ideas about how the suicide will impact others.The conflicting info on notes is more a sign of the challenges of reporting what goes on inside a maximum security prison than evidence of a conspiracy.

  42. tjacks7 says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:02 AM
    Since you openly admit you don’t have a real job, maybe you’d like to take a job as a corrections officers for a few months and let us know the reasonableness of whether or not prison staff is or should be aware of every inmates thoughts and/or intentions. Plus, I’m sure you’d appreciate the $38,000 a year for your efforts.
    ———————-
    He can’t right now. He’s too busy trying to act like Kaepernick’s agent and whine and pout because Kaep doesn’t have a job.

  43. Hernandez’s death will not save his family from losing money in a civil trial. The families of the victims are still moving forward with wrongful death lawsuits against his estate. And the burden of proof (preponderance of evidence) in a civil suit is less than in a criminal case (shadow of a doubt). In addition, suicide exempts him from having his family collect any insurance money and will plant the suggestion in the minds of jurors in the civil suit that guilt got to him.

    No, if he committed suicide, that’s the worst thing he could have done for his family, economic-wise.

  44. He also just spent a whole bunch of money on the lawyers who got him off for the double murder. That’s why suicide for helping his family financially does not make sense.

  45. shaggymarrs says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:34 AM
    He planned the whole thing to set his family up financially for life. He was found not guilty during the most recent trial and the next day he starts the appeal process of his prior conviction, commits suicide, and boom, his conviction is off the books and his estate remains intact. Not to mention the now very slim chance that the victims’ families would have winning a lawsuit against his estate.

    It’s a devious master plan.
    ———————————————
    I agree. And masterminded by Dr. Kervorkian Baez. With agreements in place that Dr. KB handle all post humous representation, it’s a win-win-win. Only losers are the families of those he killed.

  46. exinsidetrader says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:51 AM
    cincy85 says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:39 AM

    They always seem to use bed sheets, why not make them perforated? That way they just rip. To me it seems cheap and affective.
    _______________________
    You can weave anything into a rope.

    Cheaper solutions is simply to have better monitoring by correctional staff.
    =====

    Explain how this “better monitoring” would work. The inmate to staff ratio is already off the charts. So what would you do? Hire so much staff that each inmate has his own CO to watch him 24/7? That sounds like the “cheaper” solution to you?

  47. Read : New Jack, a book written by a NY Times reporter who took the Civil service exam to become a Corrections Officer, went through training and served as a C.O. in the New York State prison system for over a year. It gives you an inside view of the prison system and gives you a new perspective on the people who serve in this manner.

  48. The man showed no remorse in murdering three people – I’m afraid sympathy for his pitiful way out is in short supply. And to pin any of this on the MA authorities is sheer and utter nonsense.

  49. Brandon21, hate to burst your conspiracy theory by Hernandez had been in jail since 2013. Four years under those conditions are tough. Read up on the subject you may enlighten yourself.

  50. The conspiracy theories and sudden urge to make Arron some sort of victim in this is quite hard to understand or stomach. Just stop and remember he put himself in this position when he murdered Odin Lloyd. He had all the opportunities in the world to leave that violent life behind him, but he decided to act as he did before he became a top TE in the NFL with a multi-million dollar contract. Blaming the prison or whoever else in this situation won’t change the reasons he was there to begin with. His suicide shouldn’t be looked at anymore than the average felon who decided to take their life as well.

  51. “As mentioned Wednesday, the suicide rate for prisoners in Massachusetts was nearly double the national average for the period of 2001 through 2012.”

    Not mentioned Wednesday was the homicide rate in Massachusetts prisons is virtually nonexistent. If inmates are killing themselves and not each other it seems like that legislature is looking to fix something that isn’t broken

  52. “Why would he commit suicide in the middle of an appeal. He had a good lawyer and beat the double murder just recently. He might had a 50/50 shot of being free. The whole thing sounds fishy. Dude probably was murdered.”

    In an appeal, you either win or lose. But that doesn’t mean it’s 50/50.

    Not sure what the soap was for.

    Insurance has a suicide exclusion but that usually expires within a few years from issue. After that it may pay for suicide. Although why would someone worth millions have life insurance?

  53. Gotta love the tinfoil hat crowd. Who exactly would have been able to murder Hernandez and make it look like a hanging? He was 250-pounds of solid muscle and a cold blooded killer.

  54. Perhaps the conspiracy theorists posting here should take their ideas to a more appropriate site. Info Wars might be more supportive of his defenders.

  55. thefan08 says:

    I am not a conspiracy type of person, but this is starting to stink. First there was no note, now there are 3 notes. Then it was no one knew Aaron was suicidal and now everyone knew since he was giving all his property away. Then it was family wants to donate brain but medical examiner say no. Seriously, nothing looks shady here at all.
    ======================================

    It looks like reporters in hysteria jumping the gun.

  56. For those who have blamed liberal Massachusetts law for the ab initio clearing of Hernandez’ conviction, this is not a law passed by any liberal Massachusetts legislators; it has been on the books since Massachusetts was the most conservative colony in the British Empire.

    Much of Massachusetts law remains from the first laws of the land, which were English laws from the 17th century. This ab initio rule about appealed convictions is a holdover from that period.

    That’s what can happen when your state is effectively 400 years old!

  57. I think its just a lot simpler: he found god, had a guilty conscious about what he did and planned to kill himself as his own punishment. I think he was escaping the guilt more than the life term.

  58. This whole idea that he did it so his estate/daughter could get contract money from the Pats is flawed. His contract was voided under the conduct clause, not because of the conviction – and it happened long before the conviction.

    There’s plenty on the record to support the Pats voiding the contract – whether the conviction is voided under Mass law doesn’t really matter.

    They’re not going to get money from the Pats because he killed himself. It’s a silly idea.

  59. “He had all the opportunities in the world to leave that violent life behind him”

    Actually the biggest problem in leaving that life behind was his family living an hour and a half drive away in easy reach of him.

    I used to wonder if he had been drafted by a west coast team and thus separated from the scumbags in his life by thousands of miles if he could have risen above it and changed his life.

    But then when you look at what his was all over, someone accidentally bumping into him and spilling a drink, it says he was a psychopath and it would have been unlikely that he changed even if he was removed from those people.

  60. troylok says:

    Apr 21, 2017 8:59 AM

    If a death row inmate decides to take his or her own life, I got no problem with it. I believe they will go to a very hot place for what they did, and if they want to take the Express, then it saves the taxpayers a lot of money in incarceration costs.
    —————–
    Except he wasn’t on death row Mr. Journalist he was serving a life sentence.

  61. Those of you saying insurance doesn’t cover suicide are wrong. There’s a 2 year contestability clause that doesn’t cover suicide. After the 2 years, the policy covers it.

  62. Della Street says:
    Apr 21, 2017 9:35 AM
    And not for nothing, but the people who saying this was not a suicide are the same people who believed he was innocent. Not exactly a MESNA group there.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Or MENSA, either.

  63. He was not broke. His assets were frozen pending the results of the appeal and the second murder trial and any subsequent civil suits. With his death and the probable vacating of his guilty verdict, it will be more difficult for the state to maintain that freeze.

    His NFL pension money also kicks in. As probably does his insurance payout. So his financee and daughter are likely taken care of for life. So is Baez. Maybe his mother and brother too.

    So there is really no mystery here. He was left with a mere handful of people that hadn’t abandoned him, mainly family and of course Dr. Kervorkian Baez. They will all be well taken care of. As far as everyone else was concerned, his was the same attitude as Rhett Butler in Gone with the Wind, “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

  64. ” He might had a 50/50 shot of being free. ”

    No, there was some chance of getting the sentence reduced from First Degree to Second Degree, but there was basically no chance of getting free.

  65. “With his death and the probable vacating of his guilty verdict, it will be more difficult for the state to maintain that freeze.”

    I hadn’t thought of this angle. It is true that, because his case was still under appeal, the guilty verdict will be (has been?) vacated. So, from a legal standpoint, there is no guilt on his record.

  66. I don’t feel bad for Aaron. I don’t feel bad for his mom. I don’t feel bad for his finance. I feel bad for his daughter who had a selfish p.o.s. for a dad. One of those supposed letters should be to his little girl apologizing.

  67. Quick pivot from “no way he killed himself, they killed him” to “how did they not know he was obviously planning to kill himself…”

    How about “who cares and good riddance”

  68. harrisonhits2 says:
    Apr 21, 2017 10:24 AM

    Insurance doesn’t pay when you commit suicide.
    ===================================
    That is a myth. Typically after life insurance policy being in force for 2 years, beneficiaries can collect on any death, including suicide.

  69. 38 suicides a year by prisoners, and they want a study?
    But 22 suicides a DAY by our brave soldiers returning home from war and nothing.

    PRIORITIES.

  70. goooooobrowns says:
    Apr 21, 2017 10:12 AM
    At the risk of getting too philosophical on a sports forum or sounding draconian (lord knows the cavemen on PFT don’t need help being more draconian)… but should sanctioned suicide be allowed for convicted lifers with no chance of parole? I mean, does anyone see this a great loss or injustice?
    ———————————————————————
    I think it is unlikely for states to sanction suicide, even for convicted lifers. To do so would open the door for the Kevorkian crowd to appeal that their terminal illness be treated likewise. It’s far simpler for the state to simply look the other way and feign surprise.

  71. I feel compassion for each of the families affected by Hernandez’s actions. Aaron hurt his victims and their families.

    But I also have compassion for his family and hope his fiancé and their daughter stay strong. Daughter will be facing a tough battle.

  72. bigpete07 says:
    Apr 21, 2017 8:51 AM

    “Former Patriots tight end cheats life sentence.”
    …………………………………………………………………

    The only way he could “cheat a life sentence” would be if he escaped prison, disappeared and lived out the rest of his natural life without serving his sentence.

    His life is over, his sentence has been served.

  73. I don’t feel the least bit sorry for him. He was a real tough guy until it was time to pay the piper. I guess sitting in a room alone with your thoughts and the realization of what you threw away got to him. My heart breaks for his daughter though. No child deserves to grow up with that cloud over them.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!