After tweeting an apology, Frank Clark’s Twitter showed his real feelings

Getty Images

Usually, when someone issues an obviously insincere apology, they’re smart enough not to immediately demonstrate their insincerity. That was not the case with Seahawks defensive end Frank Clark.

Clark, who dislikes it when the media mentions his 2014 domestic violence charge, went after Natalie Weiner of Bleacher Report on Twitter because Weiner mentioned the incident in a recent piece. Clark directed a tweet at Weiner saying she would be cleaning his fish tank after losing her media job.

After Clark was criticized for that, he posted another tweet using the classic weasel-words that he was apologizing to “anyone who felt offended by my tweet.” He did not apologize to Weiner, the person he actually owed an apology, just to anyone who felt offended, suggesting perhaps that the real problem is all those easily offended people who have a problem with him.

And then Clark proceeded to like the tweets from sycophantic fans who supported him and criticized Weiner. A fan who tweeted that Clark has “nothing to apologize for” got a like from Clark. Three fans who tweeted criticisms of Weiner got likes from Clark.

By liking those tweets, Clark was showing that he still doesn’t get it: The problem, in Frank Clark’s world view, is not that he was charged with domestic violence and not that he tweeted an attack at a writer who mentioned that fact. The problem is that a writer wrote about his past in an article about domestic violence in football. In Frank Clark’s world view, he’s the victim in all this.

57 responses to “After tweeting an apology, Frank Clark’s Twitter showed his real feelings

  1. She deserved to be mocked. The police had no evidence that any physical violence occurred. That’s why they caved.

    And in most states anytime a woman claims she was touched the police are forced by law to arrest and file charges, whether there is any independent corroboration or not. Charges mean nothing in these cases, only convictions.

    Ask Greg Hardy.

    I don’t blame him for being mad.

  2. derekgorgonstar says:

    This Seahawks team is becoming shockingly easy to hate.
    —————————————————————–
    Yeah, ’cause they’re better than your team.

  3. Not my fault.

    Classic millenial line. It truly sums up the mentality of a good percentage of the youngsters, including my own children. Not really applicable to this story, but for some reason, that is what I read.

  4. The problem with the initial article was that it assumed the guilt of Frank Clark even though the evidence never supported it. SO much so that the Prosecutor was the one who recommended dropping the charges altogether.

    DV is a huge problem in the world and in the NFL… but irrational thinking and uninformed judgments doesn’t do anything to help the situation. I’d be pissed too and the author’s status as a woman doesn’t protect her from criticism any more than it should protect a man.

  5. Hey seahawkhomermoronmike, have you looked into his case? The woman had a sizable welt on her face from where he struck her. But don’t let facts or decency get in the way of your idiotic fandom.

  6. It amazes me how people on this site endlessly complain about the greed and irresponsibility of the old dudes who run the NFL, and still somehow find ways to finger “millennial” as the problem in almost any situation.

    Every generation has jerks and scum. Whose generation produced 58-year old Roger Goodell, again?

  7. sillybillywillyrillyinphilly says:
    May 10, 2017 1:42 PM
    Not my fault.

    Classic millenial line. It truly sums up the mentality of a good percentage of the youngsters, including my own children. Not really applicable to this story, but for some reason, that is what I read.

    ———————————————————————

    What does this have to do with millennials? This a domestic abuse issue where the one doing the abusing has a problem with others talking about the issue and including his case as an example. This isn’t about his generation because domestic abuse/assault is not a generational issue. This a conversation about the lowest of the low.

    As for Frank having an issue with the writer bringing it up, it’s a matter of public record. Deal with it like an adult and not a child.

  8. I’ll say this for Twitter. It has made idiot recognition almost instantaneous. In previous decades, one had to discern a bit to see if a pattern emerged. Ain’t technology grand?

  9. Is really claiming to be a victim or is he mad that it will always be brought by someone?

  10. Nobody needs to clean his fish tank. It’ll get cleaned up prior to the inevitable bankruptcy sale.

  11. Did he like tweets that disagreed with him? Just saying. Maybe he’s just “acknowledging” people who posts under his twitter by liking their comments rather than singling out those who he agrees with.

  12. losingisnotanoption says:
    May 10, 2017 1:39 PM
    I follow football religiously all year round.

    Never heard of Frank Clark prior to today.

    Now I think he’s a DB.

    Gonna give me a thumb down on that one, eh Frankie?

    _____________________________

    You must be one of those people who think, “Well, if I haven’t heard of him, then he must not be any good.”

    Lol.

    FYI: Frank Clark amassed 10 sacks last season.

    I thought you watched football religiously?

  13. I got an idea, why doesn’t he just focus on football since his writing and interpersonal skills seem to be lacking.

    I don’t know if he did hit the girl but the more he carries on about it, the guiltier he appears. I will engage in the false narrative (Frank Clark is a punk, Frank Clark is a Seahawk therefore all Seahawks are punks) because I’m sure a morally upstanding coach like Peter Carroll (cough cough) wouldn’t put up with that.

  14. I have no problem with Clark getting mad. Too often, the media likes to play this game like one bad act defines a person. I didn’t read the article this journalist wrote but something tells me the article doesn’t speak on everything else Clark has done to move on from this act.

    I know I would be upset if every time people speak about me, they only bring up a single bad act I was accused off years prior. So, if I was him, I wouldn’t apologize.

  15. So was he just charged or convicted? I agree with him if he was acquitted, its unfair to keep dragging his name through the mud. But if he copped a plea or was found guilty then its open season.

  16. why should he be any different than the current administration and the sheep that were duped into voting for it?

  17. Frank has a right to defend himself does he not?

    It’s ok for anybody in the media to take shots at somebody’s history and it’s just ok?

    If it were you instead of Frank, I bet you’d be whistling a different tune.

    Everybody has mistakes, not everybody has their mistakes displayed to everybody all so somebody can make a name for themselves.

    Easy to criticize either side, look in the mirror and ask how you’d feel in his shoes.

  18. Seems like he is in-line for a pay raise from Seahawks. Trade away multiple picks for Percy Harvin and Marshawn Lynch, Draft Frank Clark, Draft Jarran Reed and Malik McDowll who quit on his team with 2 months left in the season… even their head coach ran away from his dirty college program when he learned there was going to be NCAA sanctions.

  19. @kruehawk

    Please see above…you don’t know what you are talking about. Prosecutor didn’t reduce the charges he pled out because (like usual) the victim decided not to testify because I am sure he told her he was “REALLY REALLY SORRY” and she thinks she will get pay out

  20. Oh, for gawd sakes, stay off social media –
    That should be the message from Seahawks HQ to these young guys who haven’t the wherewithal to act like a grown-up.

  21. kneedragr says:
    May 10, 2017 2:44 PM
    So was he just charged or convicted? I agree with him if he was acquitted, its unfair to keep dragging his name through the mud. But if he copped a plea or was found guilty then its open season.

    ——————————————————-
    Clark admitted to hitting Diamond Hurt in a (mind bogglingly generous) plea deal.

    You can search her name to see the cut and welt on her face.

  22. It’s fair to mention past incidents when they are relevant, but do we all think that reporters do not also bring up these things when they’re not relevant to bring some attention to their stories?

    In all honesty, it’s hard for me to feel bad for either of the two. Players get too entitled sometimes, but reporters also (not just in sports, mind you) can be very eager to stir or bring back controversy when they are able.

  23. To the guy who said there was no physical evidence of an assault? Not according to police officer Martin Curran who arrested Clark even though the girlfriend didn’t want him to.

    According to the report, Curran told her that “in Ohio when a domestic violence victim does not want to pursue a criminal charge against the offender and there are signs of physical violence, we are guided by law to charge that offender with domestic violence. I advised her Frank would be arrested, he would be incarcerated in jail, and he would be charged with domestic violence.”

    Responding to a female reporter with a comment like this is pure stupidity.

  24. sillybillywillyrillyinphilly says:
    May 10, 2017 1:42 PM
    Not my fault.

    Classic millenial line. It truly sums up the mentality of a good percentage of the youngsters, including my own children. Not really applicable to this story, but for some reason, that is what I read.

    I know lots of baby boomers with this attitude.

  25. first richard sherman now frank clark? the nfl is making these players think that they are more important than they really are

  26. I don’t know what happen between Frank and the young lady. There are pics that shows a bruise. I do lnow a female prosecutor put her career on the line and said that didn’t believes that Frank Clark didn’t hit her are punched her. Why would she say that. The story the reporter wrote was slanted one way. Why don’t journalist give the whole story. All these domestic violence cases are all one sided. Not saying these are innocent but it’s a reason why the jear both sided. Frank Clark just needs to stay off twitter.

  27. Just because the owner of your team is mega-wealthy, doesn’t automatically elevate the status of the hired help, which is what Clark and Sherman are. Being the loudest voice in the room doesn’t make your message important, it makes you appear desperate and foolish.

  28. To all of the people saying that Clark, “made a mistake”…

    Beating a woman is not a “mistake”.
    It is proof that the person is scum.

    Now live with it, Big Man.

  29. The guy had 10 sacks last year. As far as I’m concerned, he can non-apologize apologize to 3rd tier sports reporters who take pot shots at him until the cows come home.

  30. Maybe it is in his past and he sees no valid reason for it to be broadcast to the public view at this time…. you people never respect anyone’s privacy….

  31. So we are at an age in human history where “liking tweets” is an offense?

    Has anyone been to the cesspool of here-say and advertising that is “Bleacher Report”?

  32. drunkinsconnie says:
    May 10, 2017 1:38 PM

    Just 12s being 12s.
    _________________________________

    12s are the fans, not the players. This is just a player being a player… albeit a foolhardy one.

  33. Is he not justified in having those feelings?

    Any one of us who have anything in our lives we’re glad we were able to move on from (which, let’s be honest, is all of us) should be able to understand the frustration of not being allowed to move on from something, especially when the people dredging up your past had nothing to do with it.

    Is he a bad guy? I don’t know. None of us know him. Is it inappropriate to speak this way to journalists? Probably, though the relative merits of said journalist/writing are fair game.

  34. A Seahawks player with a DV charge? I’m stunned. With the way people talk, I was sure it was only the Bengals that harbored a criminal or 2.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!