Jalen Robinette faces “non-criminal disciplinary proceeding” at Air Force Academy

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The mystery regarding NFL hopeful Jalen Robinette’s omission from graduation at Air Force Academy is a bit closer to being resolved. But not by much.

Via the Denver Post, Robinette’s football agency has disclosed that Robinette “is currently awaiting a determination on a non-criminal disciplinary proceeding.”

“Due to privacy-related concerns, we are unable to comment on the circumstances,” the Air Force Academy said in a statement issued to the Post. “We can say that the circumstances do not involve any allegations of criminal wrongdoing and are unrelated to cadet Robinette’s professional football pursuits.”

Since the NFL draft, the unselected Robinette participated in rookie minicamps with the Bills and Patriots. He did not receive a job offer from either team.

The resolution to his status with the Air Force potentially could allow him to pursue professional football unfettered by the new requirement that at least two years of active duty be served. If Robinette is deemed ineligible to graduate or be commissioned as an officer in the Air Force, he could be given the option to reimburse the government for his education (valued at more than $400,000) and exit the military or enlist as a non-officer.

Ultimately, the final decision on Robinette’s graduation and commissioning will be made by the Air Force. After that, more will be known about whether Robinette will be permitted to play pro football.

17 responses to “Jalen Robinette faces “non-criminal disciplinary proceeding” at Air Force Academy

  1. The service academies need to make it easier for professional level athletes to fulfill their obligation without gutting their NFL chances.

  2. Just sneak him onto the Enterprise. He’ll be inexplicably promoted to first officer in five minutes, and somehow captain of the ship half an hour later. Career = saved.

  3. redlikethepig says:
    May 27, 2017 5:55 PM

    The service academies need to make it easier for professional level athletes to fulfill their obligation without gutting their NFL chances.
    __________________________________

    Yeah, they really don’t. If you take that scholarship to go there, you make a commitment so you should not be surprised that they make you actually serve.

  4. As a grad from West Point many years ago, I strongly disagree with letting academy graduates not fulfilling their service obligations. I know the Naval academy has allowed it, but the military academies are supposed to be supplying combat leaders for our nation not players for the NFL

  5. A cadet’s word used to be linked to his honor. I guess things have changed in a generation.
    Jalen took an appointment that would have been filled by someone that wanted to serve their country.
    If he wanted to play football, then he should have taken one of the offers from Bowling Green, Fordham or Ohio.

  6. “(valued at more than $400,000)”

    This is a problem. Why does a 4 year college education cost that much.

  7. redlikethepig says:
    May 27, 2017 5:55 PM
    The service academies need to make it easier for professional level athletes to fulfill their obligation without gutting their NFL chances.

    redlikethepig says:
    May 27, 2017 7:22 PM

    Trump got off with bone spurs.
    _____________________

    It’s never hard to pick out the tools that haven’t served and simply do not understand the concept of being honor bound. If someone became ‘professional level’ athletes while attending US service academies then it is because the service academies made them that way. If they were ‘all that’ going in and had professional aspirations they shouldn’t have gone to a service academy. Not only do they take an oath and sign a contract but everyone that attends a service academy took one of a very limited, restricted and highly prized number of slots that could have gone to someone else that merited it.

    I am a constitutionalist and therefore no fan of Clinton or Trump but he did not attend a US service academy. That makes the bone spur comment not just irrelevant but spurious and contemptible at best and duplicitous on it’s face. There’s more than enough legitimate issues available to vent your my side didn’t win spleen over without making a willful misrepresentation that makes you no better than those you condemn. Have you no shame?

  8. thegreatgabbert says:
    May 27, 2017 6:12 PM

    Drugs or sexual harrasment would be the popular choices here.

    Both would be illegal. As stated nothing he did was criminal. I’m guessing AWOL or inappropriate relationship.

  9. kenmasters34 says:
    May 27, 2017 8:03 PM
    “(valued at more than $400,000)”

    This is a problem. Why does a 4 year college education cost that much.
    ————————————-

    Because it’s a four-year education subsidized by the same government that pays $1.5 trillion for a fighter jet that makes its pilots puke (in more ways than one) and loses dogfights to a Sopwith Camel.

  10. No matter what happened I can’t see how this will help his NFL chances. If he did something intentional to try to get out of serving he may find out he still has to fulfill his commitment of serving two years of active duty, even if it’s as an enlisted person. How embarrassing would that be to go through four years in the AFA and not get a commission. Additionally, teams may not look too highly on whatever it was he did. Let’s face it, he was a marginal prospect at best. This could be a red flag that makes teams take a pass. In essence, he may not graduate with a commission and may have flushed his NFL chances down the toilet. Not a very bright move.

  11. To me this is a non-issue.

    If you make a conscious decision to go to one of the military schools, with the agreement that you serve afterwards, then live up to your agreement. They guy wasn’t drafted.
    If I thought I was good enough to go to the NFL I wouldn’t go to one of the military schools, I’d go to regular civilian college.

  12. Let me guess. He bitched about signing onto the dotted line with this out and the gov’t rescinded it. They then silence him.

    A conscious decision to join the military if you aren’t draft per the rules isn’t the same as him pulling out and changing the rules…. that’s Uncle Sam’s job.

    If confused, please revisit the Bill of Rights and count how many don’t apply anymore by diktat.

    Maybe I’m wrong, but let’s face it. He faces discipline after being screwed. Odds (and they’re just that) are…

  13. “non-criminal disciplinary proceeding”, AKA Article 15.

    You get those for doing an upper-decker in an officer’s dorm toilet.

    Nothing to see here. Move along.

  14. redlikethepig says:
    The service academies need to make it easier for professional level athletes to fulfill their obligation without gutting their NFL chances.

    Spoken like a card-carrying, self-entitled millennial. Get whatever and as much as you can from somebody else — in this case the government, aka the taxpayers — then try to find a way out of your obligations as soon as they become inconvenient.
    I could bring up things like honor, character or commitment, but those traits are no doubt lost on you.
    This kid is an undrafted longshot to being with, but it wouldn’t matter if he were the second coming of Roger Staubach. As others have pointed out, anyone who wants to focus on pro sports should choose a college other than a service academy.
    These guys know exactly what they’re getting into. They know the benefits, and they know their obligations before they ever set foot on campus. There is no excuse for not living up to them, and no valid reason they should be given special consideration over any other cadet.

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