Michael Vick says he wants to get into coaching

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Michael Vick is finished playing, but he hopes he isn’t finished with football.

The former Pro Bowl quarterback told ESPN’s Adam Schefter he wanted to get into coaching.

I would love to coach in the National Football League one day,” Vick said. “At some point, I’d definitely love to help work with young quarterbacks and develop them and still compete, you know, with the team and with the coaches.

“It’s another way to chase a championship. You know I’m not done. I’m not done by any means. You know I didn’t get the championship when I was playing, so, hey, maybe I’d get lucky one year, maybe fortunate enough to join the staff that may be good enough.”

The former Falcons and Eagles quarterback didn’t play last year (who had stints with the Jets and Steelers), and has said he’s abandoned any thoughts of playing again. But he thinks he has things to offer young quarterbacks, and wants to share it with them.

“I think my heart is really into teaching, you know, the game of football,” Vick said. “I feel like I’ve learned so much from so many great coaches over the years. You know, I don’t want to bottle up a lot of knowledge, and [I] really can’t relay the messages that I want to relay to a high school kid because . . . you don’t have to dumb it down, but you can’t be as complex. And I get that.

“So [at the] collegiate level or professional level, you can express ideas. You can go into detail. You know you can coach hard, and that’s what I want to do.”

Vick said he hasn’t actually talked to any of his former teams or coaches about it, preferring to let the process “happen naturally.” That makes it sound like his hopes of signing a ceremonial deal with the Falcons, which they don’t seem to be as interested in as he is.

37 responses to “Michael Vick says he wants to get into coaching

  1. Can we please stop with this “pro bowl such and such”. His career cannot be stated as anything other than a massive disappointment.

    I grew up near Blacksburg watching him play. He was an absolute super hero to the kids growing up in that area and he destroyed any good will or sympathy he will ever get from me. Even IF you give him a pass for the heinous treatment of animals it says nothing to his lack of work ethic and his sense of entitlement throughout his career. Even him saying he wanted to sign a one day deal with the Falcons shows he still has no sense of self.

  2. This guys wants to get into coaching, retire as a member of the Falcons, become the head of PETA, etc… Unfortunately for him it takes two to tango and it’s amazing how delusional, unintelligent, and errogant he is to think that all should be forgotten.

  3. People are going to hate on this because that is what people do .. but Vick seems like he understands the game even if he couldn’t put it together while on the field. He might just be a decent coach. I hope he gets a shot at an internship somewhere.

    Signed someone who loves their dog

  4. Vick would be a great role model for players.
    He could instruct them on how to cash paychecks while not trying hard.
    And he could offer advice on taking care of dogs.
    No thanks, Mike.

  5. How delusional can one psychopath be?

    He managed to steal his paycheck for many years as a player and now he wants to do it as a coach.

    What a joke.

  6. I feel bad for the guy that everytime someone asks him a question and he blurts out whatever is on his mind, it’s the next blog story. ‘Ya know, I mean, I wanna be a coach and mentor some of these young quarterbacks ya know.’

  7. I had to double-check what site I was on. After reading the headline, I thought maybe it was the Onion. Vick would be a worse coach than about 99% of former players.

  8. Unfortunately, you can’t coach or teach natural God given talents… and that’s all Mike Vick ever had to offer the game of football.

  9. The guys who take coaching and are gym rats to maximize their stay on the team usually make good coaches. Vick was neither.

    He NEVER mastered the skill of carrying the ball correctly. He carried the ball in one hand and used it for balance when cutting – leading to many turnovers. You need to have a firm grasp of the basics to teach them.

  10. I think he’d be a great coach! He was able to coach his dogs to attack other dogs. I mean, that takes some skill given the language barrier between people and dogs.

    Obvi he should be on the staff in Cleveland.

  11. This is the same guy who as a NY Jet entered a game in 2014 vs. the Chargers and admitted, “Maybe I didn’t prepare or I wasn’t prepared, but I’ll tell you what, it won’t happen again.” This isn’t the guy you want coaching, for many reasons.

  12. With previous experience as a “trainer,” coachng might be the next logical step.

  13. In all seriousness, the NFL should employ Michael Vick to attend the rookie symposium to teach these guys how to not flush your career down the toilet. And it wouldn’t hurt if he visits every team throughout the season to reinforce the message to veteran players as well.

  14. It won’t be any of his past mistakes that will derail his coaching ambitions, it will be the color of skin unfortunately. Sad but true.

  15. Nice to see that all of the middle American Christian yokels who frequent this website have found it in their heart to find forgiveness. Jesus would be so happy.

    Just kidding. You people are the dregs.

  16. So according to most people here this man should not aspire to want to continue to earn a living in the field he’s worked in his entire life?

  17. patsfan4lifesbchamps says:
    Jun 2, 2017 11:27 AM
    It won’t be any of his past mistakes that will derail his coaching ambitions, it will be the color of skin unfortunately. Sad but true.
    **************************************
    Spoken like a true racist, no matter what screen name you use.

  18. Is there an English translation of his comments? You know, because…covfefe, I couldn’t understand a thing he was trying to say.

  19. joetoronto says:
    Jun 2, 2017 12:51 PM

    patsfan4lifesbchamps says:
    Jun 2, 2017 11:27 AM
    It won’t be any of his past mistakes that will derail his coaching ambitions, it will be the color of skin unfortunately. Sad but true.
    **************************************
    Spoken like a true racist, no matter what screen name you use.

    ———————–

    Why do you think there is a Rooney rule in your opinion?

  20. “zeke2517 says:
    Jun 2, 2017 12:10 PM
    Nice to see that all of the middle American Christian yokels who frequent this website have found it in their heart to find forgiveness. Jesus would be so happy.

    Just kidding. You people are the dregs.”
    _______________________________________
    I’m not a “middle American.” Nor am I a “Christian” or a “yokel,” or a “dreg.”” But it says a lot about you that you need to reduce anyone you don’t agree with to generalized, guesswork epithets; an act which is, by the way, one of the foundational techniques of racism and every other divisive belief system.

    I’ve followed Vick’s career since day one in the NFL. Looking at Vick now, as a potential employee (as would any potential employer), and assessing his “maybe,” “like,” “kinda,” thought processes, it would appear that he has the emotional age of a third-grader, the attention span of a gnat, and an enormously low (almost non-existent) level of self-awareness.

    Looking at his past performance, his record clearly defines a young (now approaching middle-aged) man who regularly brags about his athletic ability and knowledge and constantly tries to parlay that into a high profile, high-attention position. All this in a sport that he never thought highly enough of to devote his maximum focus and best work-effort to. As they say in Texas: “All hat, no cattle.”

    His lack of self-awareness and his parasitical use of mentors such as Tony Dungy et al, clearly show a man who, in spite of many opportunities, has never learned to be a functional and reciprocal human being; a man whose understanding of commitment, honor, trustworthiness, selflessness, and capacity for original thought are seriously limited, and whose obviously delusional approach to life all combine to make him a poor (and probably disruptive) choice for any future employer.

    One more thing: Personally, I don’t think Jesus gives (or would give) a fiddler’s flip about any sport, but if you believe that He cares about individuals, His wish would likely be that everyone be of service to others and give their absolute best in all their endeavors. To my knowledge, Vick has never done that. Of course, few among us have!

    Bottom line: Vick is no longer a football player, and he appears to be madly scrambling for some sort of toehold in a new stage of his career, one that will provide the attention and hero worship his previous job did.

    But no one owes it to him to treat him like a star football player anymore. It has nothing to do with forgiveness. It has everything to do with honest assessment.

  21. patsfan4lifesbchamps says:
    It won’t be any of his past mistakes that will derail his coaching ambitions, it will be the color of skin unfortunately. Sad but true.

    Yes, because there aren’t any black coaches on any of the 32 NFL teams.
    Oh wait, there are multiple black coaches on every single one of them, including seven black head coaches (the Chargers’ Anthony Lynn, Denver’s Vance Joseph, Cincinnati’s Marvin Lewis, Pittsburgh’s Mike Tomlin, Detroit’s Jim Caldwell, Cleveland’s Hue Jackson, and the Jets’ Todd Bowles).
    How convenient it must be going through life with a built-in excuse for every failure, every perceived wrong, or every time a person just doesn’t get their own way.

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