Four players publish column aimed at revived war on drugs

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A quartet of NFL players who have devoted time and effort to addressing concerns regarding the criminal justice system have written a column that advocates against what could be a renewed war on drugs.

The effort from Malcolm Jenkins, Anquan Boldin, Glover Quin, and Johnson Bademosi, posted at CNN.com, is aimed at a recent directive from Attorney General Jeff Sessions to require prosecutors to seek the strongest possible sentences in all situation, including drug offenses.

“[W]e believe our justice system is broken,” they write. “We believe America is locking the wrong people up for the wrong reasons for too long. We believe treatment and rehabilitation are often better alternatives to prison. And we believe that for those who do deserve prison time, there should also be second chances.”

The four players have spent time in D.C., meeting with members of Congress in order to effect change.

“We were so gratified to see that most of the elected officials we met in Washington on the right and on the left believe this, too,” they explain. “In fact, it seems criminal justice reform may be the only issue where members of both parties agree.”

That would be significant, given the current volume and tone of the discourse in Washington.

“We are in this for the long haul,” the players say. “We know these problems won’t be solved in a few weeks or months, but we are committed to using our voices to do whatever we can to truly make our neighborhoods safer.”

The full article can be seen here. Jenkins, Boldin, Quin, and Bademosi deserve credit for addressing a serious problem in a thoughtful way and attempting to identify solutions for solving it.

30 responses to “Four players publish column aimed at revived war on drugs

  1. We (USA) should have never privatized the penal system back in the 1980’s. Somethings should not be for profit. Incarceration is one of those things. Everything is better when don’t in moderation. That most certainly includes capitalism.

  2. I think they may be well intentioned, however they
    ‘re terribly misguided. For the first time last year, we had more Americans die of drug overdoses last than die from auto accidents. This in addition to all the crime (murder, theft, strong arming) that’s involved with the drug trade, makes increased enforcement probably a good thing.

  3. In the case where a seller sells drugs (like heroin) to users that overdose and die, the drug seller shares a responsibility in aiding his death and should have to pay.

    What “second chance” would a dead drug user get?

  4. @factschecker is right; privatizing prisons was a gross mistake. Check out the ludicrous ballooning of prison populations after this, coupled with the equally-ludicrous % of prisoners who in effect are there for simple, non-violent drug possession offenses.

    The War on Drugs is a farce, it’s ineffective while inflating our tax burden. Elsewhere in the world (heaven forbid those foreigners have good ideas) there are far more effective measures for curtailing drug abuse – such as legalization (oh my!) and decriminalization

    Also, check out how ERRONEOUS some drugs are classified… for the sole purpose of punishing to a harder extent. TONS and TONS of misinformation in our schools and government about drugs, all designed to instill fear and thus leverage increased power over the people

  5. “The full article can be seen here. Jenkins, Boldin, Quin, and Bademosi deserve credit for addressing a serious problem in a thoughtful way and attempting to identify solutions for solving it.”

    Yes they do. They are the anti Kaepernicks, they actually know what they are talking about and it’s a safe bet they weren’t wearing Castro shirts or pig socks either.

  6. Whatever your opinion on the subject you’ve got to agree this is how you effect change. You may not get as many internet blog articles about you as you would if you simply take a knee but it’s professional, grown up, and shows a true interest in the cause.

    Good for you guys.

  7. @uber16 – Those drug overdose death numbers, assuming your statistics are anywhere accurate, will never be reduced by “increased enforcement”. You want to incarnate millions of people?

    Conversely, if you put just a fraction of the billions spent on the jail system into treatment those deaths will be dramatically reduced.

  8. I think they may be well intentioned, however they
    ‘re terribly misguided. For the first time last year, we had more Americans die of drug overdoses last than die from auto accidents. This in addition to all the crime (murder, theft, strong arming) that’s involved with the drug trade, makes increased enforcement probably a good thing.
    ********************************

    Did you read the story?

  9. uber16, there already is heavy enforcement. The fact that the drug deaths are increasing is evidence of failed policies, not an argument to double down and keep beating our heads against a wall.

  10. I applaud these players. They have an issue that they feel strongly about and are actually going to the brokers of power in DC to address it. They have identified a solution and if you read the article are proposing actual tangible solutions, meeting with those on both sides of the aisle.

  11. The War on Drugs has been going on for years. The number of drug users has not decreased. The sale and distribution of drugs has not decreased. Incarcerating non-violent drug users will have absolutely no effect on the supply or the demand. I agree with the players; let’s try a different approach.

  12. The fact that the drug deaths are increasing is evidence of failed policies, not an argument to double down and keep beating our heads against a wall.
    ——-
    Drug deaths have been increasing since the 80’s and the start of the “war on drugs”. Incarceration hasn’t been effective, so why advocate for more of the same? Perhaps the money is better spent on helping these people instead of locking them up for offenses that effect no one but themselves?

  13. Their intentions are fine and all, but the prison industrial complex is real. And it can’t flourish without locking up tons of people for no good reason in many cases. Between the privatization under Reagan and Clinton’s laws which made it possible to lock up so many Black men in disproportionate fashion (leading to the silly stats that cowards love to spew online and on TV), SOMEONE’S gotta be locked up for the complex to grow. This was the intent.

    They’re surely not applying these already warped drug offences on even terms. Or else the prisons would all be overpopulated. Some get the benefit of the cops looking the other way, while others have the cops go out of their way to find a half a gram and BOOM, 3-5 years.

  14. It’s your white, middle class kids that are dying from heroine.

    Every story around heroine ends in death or near death. No so much with weed…. Stick to weed.

  15. no matter your politics I think we can all agree the “war on drugs” has failed miserably! and it effects everyone! we spend so much tax money every year locking up non violent drug users and sellers and it does nothing. private prisons are the real problem. the government is actually required to keep them at 85% capacity or higher by contract. that is just insane. its been going on for almost 30 years and nothing has changed. definitely time for a new approach!

  16. drug deaths are related to the opioids. those are the legal drugs. in this country, the drug companies took a few lessons from the illegal drug dealers. the first taste is on the house, after that you pay. these powerfully addictive drugs are legal. think about it, heroin and methamphetamines are legal and sold on every corner at CVS or Walgreen’s. yet a plant that kills cancer cells is considered to have no medical value. kind of like bitter almonds or ibogaine. drugs that cure are illegal; drugs that can kill are legal.

  17. Bravo to all of them This how you effect change in a society. Regardless if you agree with their view or not, they took the proper path and acted accordingly in a civilized manner. Bravo 👏

  18. We believe treatment and rehabilitation are often better alternatives to prison.
    ======================================

    But you would be talking about forced treatment. That doesn’t work. Rehabilitation only works when the druggie is ready. Lock ’em up.

  19. .
    2 Questions

    1. What’s the difference between the ” War on Drugs” and Prohibition?

    2. Why is it legal to consume an addictive substance in liquid form, but possession of a similar substance in powdered form carries a 25- life sentence.
    .

  20. I agree that the War on Drugs is a futile one and the justice system isn’t ideal. I’m very afraid of what they will come up with to replace it. I don’t trust the left or the right at this point they all seem like clowns.

  21. When I was young they warned of weed being a gateway drug. Well 30 years later the superbowl of gateway drugs (painkillers) blow past weed as the all time hall of fame gateway drug. The only difference is the painkillers are a product of big pharma

  22. Lets see… for profit prisons need more prisoners….so they can make more money…so Jeffy wants to “seek the strongest possible sentences in all situations” ALL SITUATIONS !! Follow the cash !

  23. “Mr. Wright 212 says:
    Jun 6, 2017 12:45 PM
    Their intentions are fine and all, but the prison industrial complex is real. And it can’t flourish without locking up tons of people for no good reason in many cases. Between the privatization under Reagan and Clinton’s laws which made it possible to lock up so many Black men in disproportionate fashion (leading to the silly stats that cowards love to spew online and on TV), SOMEONE’S gotta be locked up for the complex to grow. This was the intent.
    They’re surely not applying these already warped drug offences on even terms. Or else the prisons would all be overpopulated. Some get the benefit of the cops looking the other way, while others have the cops go out of their way to find a half a gram and BOOM, 3-5 years.”

    EXACTLY !! FOLLOW THE MONEY !!!!!! The amount of money made on the “war on drugs” is in the Billions. Gives millions jobs, and people pay for it with a part of their lives. There HAS to be a better way.

  24. uber16 says:
    Jun 6, 2017 12:07 PM

    I think they may be well intentioned, however they
    ‘re terribly misguided. For the first time last year, we had more Americans die of drug overdoses last than die from auto accidents. This in addition to all the crime (murder, theft, strong arming) that’s involved with the drug trade, makes increased enforcement probably a good thing.
    ===============================
    yeah just send them to prison instead. it always helps………

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