Broncos give their players a stern talk about social media

AP

Like a parent giving a child his first phone, the Broncos are sitting their players down and talking to them about what’s appropriate to share on social media.

“We spend a lot of time with our players as far as education about social media,” Broncos coach Vance Joseph said, via ESPN. “They’re like your kids. You have to constantly remind them about the dangers of the innocent behavior.”

The Broncos were reminded of the importance of proper social media conduct last week after safety Will Parks posted video from practice of two plays. Because the two plays were incompletions thrown by Paxton Lynch, many took Parks’ post as a criticism of Lynch, but Joseph said that wasn’t Parks’ intention.

Regardless of intent, however, Joseph doesn’t want to see anything from practice end up on social media.

“But, he can’t do it. What we do here is personal and private. But, his intent was not to hurt us or his teammate,” Joseph said.

Social media is a concern for all 32 NFL teams, and coaches don’t always feel well-prepared for what a 20-something who lives on social media might decide to post for the world to see. That’s why they try to get on the same page in advance.

35 responses to “Broncos give their players a stern talk about social media

  1. I’m not sure why the Broncos coaching staff feels that videos of their QBs throwing incompletions should be kept under wraps? After all, it’s absolutely no secret Lynch & Siemian will be doing that a lot during the regular season, although in fairness I also expect them to throw a fair amount of completions to opposing teams’ DBs too.

  2. This old Bronco fan shakes head at another stupid issue involving pot in Colorado. It’s legal, yet Bronco players are not allowed to partake.

    While I haven’t toked up since the 60’s and I think it’s usually best for people to avoid drugs and alcohol, theres a perverse dynamic when you place normal people in seductive environments and then forbid them to sample the wares.

    It would be like putting a horny guy in a room of naked women and telling him not to look. Or leave a dog alone in a room with hamburger on the floor and punish him if he eats some.

    The league ends up treating these adult players like children because the rules are contrary to basic human instincts.

  3. denverdave3 says:
    Jun 12, 2017 8:11 AM
    This old Bronco fan shakes head at another stupid issue involving pot in Colorado. It’s legal, yet Bronco players are not allowed to partake.

    While I haven’t toked up since the 60’s and I think it’s usually best for people to avoid drugs and alcohol, theres a perverse dynamic when you place normal people in seductive environments and then forbid them to sample the wares.

    It would be like putting a horny guy in a room of naked women and telling him not to look. Or leave a dog alone in a room with hamburger on the floor and punish him if he eats some.

    The league ends up treating these adult players like children because the rules are contrary to basic human instincts.
    ———
    I agree that there are many rules that treat these guys like children, but no one is forcing them to play in the NFL.

  4. At the end of the day, they can post whatever they want.

    Doesn’t mean there won’t be consequences for it. This is probably something their 1st grade teacher should have taught them.

  5. Perhaps a few people are starting to see that overall social media is not a good thing. The potential for harm far outweighs the good.

    All social media has done is given every idiot a megaphone.

  6. It’s ASOCIAL media, there’s little that’s social about it – it does little to increase fandom but merely soaks existing (younger) ones, whilst providing acres of negative press for the player, or his team-mates/staff/org.

    And the worst example to remind players of? Possibly Antonio Brown’s video of Tomlin calling the Patriots a-holes. It actually broke NFL Integrity Rules to publicly disparage another team – Fraudger gave Brown a pass (he just got a small team fine). However, it was utterly stupid because it was just before the AFCCG and the bulletin board value helped ensure the Pats were fired up enough to not just beat the Steelers but give them a 60-minute beatdown.

  7. You know DenverDave, most of the players are children who have never had to grow up. They’ve been coddled since the first time they showed talent for what they do and continue to be coddled until they are used up. Dicipline is what separates child like behavior from adult behavior and knowing right from wrong and most of these spoiled brats haven’t a clue until someone at the top explains it to them.

  8. streetyson says:
    Jun 12, 2017 8:19 AM
    It’s ASOCIAL media, there’s little that’s social about it – it does little to increase fandom but merely soaks existing (younger) ones, whilst providing acres of negative press for the player, or his team-mates/staff/org.

    And the worst example to remind players of? Possibly Antonio Brown’s video of Tomlin calling the Patriots a-holes. It actually broke NFL Integrity Rules to publicly disparage another team – Fraudger gave Brown a pass (he just got a small team fine). However, it was utterly stupid because it was just before the AFCCG and the bulletin board value helped ensure the Pats were fired up enough to not just beat the Steelers but give them a 60-minute beatdown.

    ————

    In all fairness to Brown, the Pats would have administered a beat-down to the Steelers even without the post

  9. New England>Your Team says:
    Jun 12, 2017 8:17 AM
    At the end of the day, they can post whatever they want.

    Doesn’t mean there won’t be consequences for it. This is probably something their 1st grade teacher should have taught them.
    =======================

    That’s the parents job. If a kid doesn’t know that actions have consequences by the time they get to kindergarten then there’s already been a serious failure. From there on it’s just a matter of delineating what is acceptable and what is not. Cross the line, do the time no buts about it.

    Teams need to make that line impossible to miss. What would Belichick or Coughlin have done if AB had streamed from their locker rooms? Guessing it would have been more than “I’m disappointed in you young man.” But then again it’s highly unlikely Brown would have even though about doing it if he played for them.

  10. Its a good point and this is a story of a coach doing his job properly. Every team should be enforcing this. Plus the White House should too.

  11. I have uncommon sense. Back in the old days when I was just a boy, almost everyone had sense. Back then we called it common sense.

    It’s mostly about recognizing and respecting the world around you.

  12. I’ve come to the conclusion that most players are social morons and don’t have a clue how their “tweeting” and such is hurting them.

  13. “It’s legal, yet Bronco players are not allowed to partake.”

    It is not legal. It is against Federal Controlled Substance laws for possession. The lack of enforcement does not make it legal because the state has a conflicting law.

  14. If they use the Prez as a model, they’ll all be in the doghouse by morning.

  15. bannedfromchoirpractice says:

    If they use the Prez as a model, they’ll all be in the doghouse by morning.
    ================================

    You mean the White House. The place Hillary ain’t.

  16. factschecker says:
    Jun 12, 2017 8:59 AM
    I have uncommon sense. Back in the old days when I was just a boy, almost everyone had sense. Back then we called it common sense.

    It’s mostly about recognizing and respecting the world around you.
    ___________________________

    What we perceive as common sense used to be just that but it has inexorably devolved. Having gone from being the expected thru becoming an oxymoron, it has now reached the point where it has become rare enough to be classified as a superpower.

  17. ———————————————————–
    abninf says:

    You mean the White House. The place Hillary ain’t.
    ————————————————————

    Hillary doesn’t tweet unless she’s drunk. No one can figure out when Donald doesn’t tweet, or when he’s not drunk, for that matter.

  18. I don’t see what the big deal is posting Paxton Lynch throwing incompletions at practice on FB is. Everyone will see plenty of those every Sunday that Lynch plays as Denver prepares to go 5-11 and out of the playoffs.

  19. I follow several NFL players on Twitter and many of them are surprisingly bright and articulate. They’re also smart enough to realize that anything about their team should be very generic. Some, like Aaron Rodgers, go radio silent once the season begins.

    Then there are the rest, lol. Like so much that happens on social media, the word that comes to mind is “unnecessary”.

  20. The entire world needs a stern talk about social media, not just the Broncos.

    It is ruining people’s lives and gives people a platform that they shouldn’t have. Are people still posting lonelies (selfies) of themselves and posting what they ate on social media? At the end of the day, who really cares?

  21. denverdave3 says:
    Jun 12, 2017 8:11 AM

    ……… Or leave a dog alone in a room with hamburger on the floor and punish him if he eats some.

    The league ends up treating these adult players like children because the rules are contrary to basic human instincts.

    ________________________________________
    Proper analogy would be how guard dogs are trained to ignore steak or any other food or inducement when on duty, even if they haven’t been fed for extended period. It’s called being trained to do your job.
    There is not one player in the NFL that doesn’t fall into a similar category. Even practice squad players are paid an elite salary not a basic salary and are expected to perform accordingly.

  22. Before you know it, you’re going to have the head of the FBI leaking confidentiality agreement covered documents to the press. Watch. I bet it happens……..

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