Dontari Poe has 125,000 reasons to weigh 340 pounds or less

AP

Eddie Lacy isn’t the only NFL player with a lucrative weigh-in looming.

Falcons nose tackle Dontari Poe has a weigh-in tomorrow. If he weighs 340 pounds or less, he gets a $125,000 bonus, according to Field Yates of ESPN.

A total of $500,000 is riding on Poe’s weight this year. He gets three more $125,000 bonus payments if he weighs in at 330 or less at the start of training camp, at the start of the regular season and in November. Poe, who was listed at 346 pounds last season, has said he’s confident he’s going to make weight.

Weight is really not the best way to measure a person’s fitness, and when Lacy was on the Packers the team made a point of assessing him not with a scale, but with a body composition analysis that measured his fat and muscle mass. A player could hit a weight goal by losing muscle mass, or by spending a few hours in the sauna and shedding water weight, but that wouldn’t be a healthy way to go about it.

However, body weight is simpler and easier to verify than body composition, which is why teams and agents generally put weight clauses in contracts. For Poe, the weight clause is worth half a million dollars.

13 responses to “Dontari Poe has 125,000 reasons to weigh 340 pounds or less

  1. Does anyone know why a reason is worth $1? Does someone who makes $100/day working have 100 reasons to go to work today?

  2. IMO a more effective form of negative incentive would be a “claw back” clause from the signing bonus.

    It’s far more painful (better incentive) to have to write a check and give back money you’ve already put in the bank than simply giving up money that could be viewed as just something extra/an added bonus just for staying in shape.

    A claw back clause would’t be that hard to justify if defined correctly in the contract. Something along the lines that the signing bonus assumes that the player is in relatively the same shape that he was at the signing of the contract (assuming he’s healthy) and ready to play at the start of each NFL season for the life of the contract.

  3. allforfunnplay says:

    Jun 12, 2017 11:11 AM
    IMO a more effective form of negative incentive would be a “claw back” clause from the signing bonus.

    It’s far more painful (better incentive) to have to write a check and give back money you’ve already put in the bank than simply giving up money that could be viewed as just something extra/an added bonus just for staying in shape….

    ———————————————————–

    Good luck getting your money back in too many of these cases, unfortunately.

  4. Its never easy losing weight but if he gets some good counseling and makes his mind up I know that he can do it. Then put all that extra cash into some good quality mutual funds and don’t look back.

  5. chuckxx says:
    Jun 12, 2017 12:13 PM
    Its never easy losing weight but if he gets some good counseling and makes his mind up I know that he can do it. Then put all that extra cash into some good quality mutual funds and don’t look back.

    ———-

    Counseling? How about just take some ownership of his own life. Quit eating so much and hit the gym more often….

  6. whodat5150 says:
    Jun 12, 2017 11:32 AM
    allforfunnplay says:

    Jun 12, 2017 11:11 AM
    IMO a more effective form of negative incentive would be a “claw back” clause from the signing bonus.

    It’s far more painful (better incentive) to have to write a check and give back money you’ve already put in the bank than simply giving up money that could be viewed as just something extra/an added bonus just for staying in shape….

    ———————————————————–

    Good luck getting your money back in too many of these cases, unfortunately.
    ~~~~~~~~~
    Player either writes a check or forfeits all pay and bonuses until the claw-back is paid. If he owes $200k and makes $100k per game, then he does not get paid for 2 games

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