NFL players support protesting Texas youth team

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Much like Colin Kaepernick, the Beaumont Bulls paid a price for their protest.

But unlike the unemployed-for-no-valid-reason quarterback, the Bulls are getting some NFL backing and are back on the field.

According to Tim McManus of ESPN.com, a group of NFL players donated $20,000 to help the Texas youth team, after their season was canceled last year after taking a knee during the national anthem.

Last September, the Beaumont Bulls 11-12-year-old team took a knee. The Bay Area Football League promptly suspended coach Rah Rah Barber. This year they’re back as the Southeast Texas Oilers, as members of a different organization.

Malcolm Jenkins and Torrey Smith of the Eagles; Patriots defensive back Devin McCourty; and free-agent wide receiver Anquan Boldin were among the players who wrote the checks to support their start-up. Jenkins and Boldin heard about the situation during a panel discussion in Houston  during Super Bowl week set up by Ross Initiative in Sports for Equality (That’s Ross as in Dolphins owner Stephen Ross.)

“We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it’s OK to stand up for what you believe in,” Jenkins said. “We didn’t want them to walk away from the season feeling punished for trying to do the right thing. We wanted to make sure that was rewarded and acknowledged and encouraged, so that was our main motivation for helping.”

The donation covered the cost of equipment needed for the team to take the field this fall.

Oilers vice president April Parkerson said the movement began with her son Jaelun, who was troubled by the shooting of Philando Castile in Minnesota by a police officer. And following the example set by Kaepernick, the team decided to take a knee as he did.

“We thought about it long and hard because we are a military family,” April Parkerson said. “We had the support of friends and family and we all believe in doing the right thing and we all took a knee together. It just took off from there.”

The team told the Bay Area Football League about the planned protest before a Sept. 10 game, but opinions changed quickly against them, including death threats coming in by social media.

Jenkins was among the players to lodge similar protests last year, raising a fist during the anthem for all but one game.

“As role models, when you step out there and you demonstrate something, especially something as big as what happened last year with the protests in the NFL. . . . I think it’s definitely the responsibility of those out in front to think about the impact that it has on everyone behind them,” Jenkins said. “Because some of these kids and coaches and youth teams don’t have the same protections and securities that we have. And so I think it’s definitely a responsibility to at least thoroughly explain why you demonstrated, why you’re doing what you’re doing, so that people understand the risks and consequences, and that you also encourage them and support them.”

Now if they can just find a team willing to support the guy who started the movement.

54 responses to “NFL players support protesting Texas youth team

  1. “unlike the unemployed-for-no-valid-reason quarterback”????

    When are you guys going to learn that this site has become a laughingstock over the Kaepernick wailing? NFL fans detest him, and he’s going to continue to be black-balled by NFL owners who don’t want to lose money from a disgruntled fan base.

    If you really want to do the kid some good, find him a Canadian agent.

  2. Yeah, I’m sure it was the kids that really wanted to protest!!

    The stupidity of parents politicizing youth sports

  3. I’m totally fine with anybody kneeling in protest, but why has Kaepernick said he’s not continuing with it? What’s changed? Maybe I don’t understand the goals of the kneeling protest. What were the goals and were they actually met?

  4. 11-12 year old children are not role models … and it’s a stretch to think they’re that politically aware or committed. I suspect they were led.

  5. It’s a shame this article got posted so early in the day so all of the people that hate kaepernick won’t see it. Wether you support kaepernick or not this is a conversation we need to be having and he made an impact on those kids. If you watch the video of Castile and don’t feel sick I don’t know what to tell you and if you don’t think a conversation atleast needs to be had then I don’t know if there’s anything to tell you. Obviously no one thinks all cops are bad but one bad cop is too many. If you disagree and think it’s impossible to have all good cops imagine if I changed the word cop to Syrian refuses and I bet you have no problem saying one bad refuge isn’t worth the risk.

  6. All Kap did wrong
    Was not stand for their song?
    Kap pointed to their shame
    They say just play da game?
    They say Kap has no right
    To point to the sight
    That he sees every night
    They say ignore the blood that we shed
    The problem is all in Kaps head?
    So now all they can say
    Is Kap was no good anyway?

  7. Yeah, I’m sure a bunch of 11 year olds from Texas are very concerned over something that happened in Minnesota. The whole thing is made up by the parents and coaches who told the kids to take an knee.

  8. A group of NFL players donated $20,000 to help the Texas youth team, after their season was canceled last year after taking a knee during the national anthem.

    Why aren’t the NFL players who feel that Colin Kaepernick is being treated unfairly doing the same thing for him? Maybe because he isn’t the leader for social change everyone makes him out to be….

  9. This is BS. These kids are being used as pawns to make political statements. They don’t even understand what they’re “protesting”. Disgusting!

  10. I think that the team’s protest was more about the coach than the kids. No one want Colin because he simply is not good enough as much as ESPN wants to make it sound political.

  11. I blame the coaches for this stupidity, 11-12 yr olds have little clue other than playstation. To use them for a statement is shameful and if they did it on their own, shame on the coaches for allowing it. Deeds, not grandiose symbolisms change a culture, if I was their parent I would be pissed that my son just lost a year of his football growth for some senseless grandstand. Go out and actually make a difference.

  12. I personally find it deeply unpatriotic to attempt to force groups of people to stand for the national anthem and punish them if they won’t.

  13. Perhaps a more troubling result of this action is the exposure of the ignorant masses that believe 11-12 year olds don’t have brains and opinions of their own. Freedom, in opinion or by action, applies to everyone regardless of age.

  14. ebr362 says:
    Jun 23, 2017 8:45 AM
    I blame the coaches for this stupidity, 11-12 yr olds have little clue other than playstation. To use them for a statement is shameful and if they did it on their own, shame on the coaches for allowing it. Deeds, not grandiose symbolisms change a culture, if I was their parent I would be pissed that my son just lost a year of his football growth for some senseless grandstand. Go out and actually make a difference.

    —————–

    Regardless of you feelings toward the chosen method of protest, you are completely wrong about 11-12 year olds having no clue. They are very in tune with what is happening related to racial issues and most likely have a more progressive view then many adults. They also are in tune with social injustice. While the rest of us are slogging away at our jobs, kids are learning. They are taught to demand to be treated fairly and equally and they are taught to stand up for what they believe in.

    So, sure, disagree with how they chose to protest, but listen to them, because they are pointing out a real problem. Give them some guidance on how they can “Go out and make a difference” to address the issues they care about.

  15. I hope they kneel in the first game, and their season gets cancelled again.

    These are 12 year old children. Don’t push your political views on children.

  16. concmike says:
    Jun 23, 2017 8:33 AM
    A group of NFL players donated $20,000 to help the Texas youth team, after their season was canceled last year after taking a knee during the national anthem.
    Why aren’t the NFL players who feel that Colin Kaepernick is being treated unfairly doing the same thing for him? Maybe because he isn’t the leader for social change everyone makes him out to be….

    —————

    I don’t think it’s that people are supporting the kids because they believe in Colin Kaepernick at all. They believe that issue that the kids are protesting is real. McCourty didn’t kneel during the anthem, he put his fist up. He didn’t agree with disrespecting the anthem, but he is still against racial injustice.

  17. Imagine what all our allies around the world are thinking when they watch how we act. I bet most of our friends around the world have a better understanding of what our flag represents, than half of us do. We wave our flag to show everyone we’re a free country, but half of us don’t seem to agree with the idea of freedom. Whether you like Kaepernick or not. Whether you like these kids from military families or not. I guess I never thought of freedom as a bad thing. The reason America is the strongest nation in the world is because we’re willing to fight for freedom, not fight against it.

  18. “But unlike the unemployed-for-no-valid-reason quarterback”

    Actually there are a number of very valid reason….the main one being that Kaep is not a good QB

  19. If you assume that the protest method was the wrong approach, do people agree that there is actually an issue with racial injustice or do people think there is no issue?

    Thumbs up if you think there is an issue and thumbs down if you don’t.

  20. Ugh… I’m so tired of hearing about this BS.

    IF KAP WAS GOOD ENOUGH… HE’D BE PLAYING SOMEWHERE.

    He isn’t good enough. Period.

    Epitome of ‘flash in a pan’.

  21. Funny because if nobody had gotten all riled up about their precious flag, nobody outside of their dismal little town would have ever known about their protest. But here I sit in Shanghai and I’m reading about some children who are trying to make a difference in their world. And the people who got hysterical about it gave them more publicity than they ever could have dreamt.

    I don’t know how police violence became a political issue in the first place. We place an enormous amount of trust in our public servants. Is it politically biased to expect them to not kill innocent citizens?

  22. bullcharger says:
    Jun 23, 2017 9:15 AM
    ebr362 says:
    Jun 23, 2017 8:45 AM
    I blame the coaches for this stupidity, 11-12 yr olds have little clue other than playstation. To use them for a statement is shameful and if they did it on their own, shame on the coaches for allowing it. Deeds, not grandiose symbolisms change a culture, if I was their parent I would be pissed that my son just lost a year of his football growth for some senseless grandstand. Go out and actually make a difference.

    —————–

    Regardless of you feelings toward the chosen method of protest, you are completely wrong about 11-12 year olds having no clue. They are very in tune with what is happening related to racial issues and most likely have a more progressive view then many adults. They also are in tune with social injustice. While the rest of us are slogging away at our jobs, kids are learning. They are taught to demand to be treated fairly and equally and they are taught to stand up for what they believe in.

    So, sure, disagree with how they chose to protest, but listen to them, because they are pointing out a real problem. Give them some guidance on how they can “Go out and make a difference” to address the issues they care about.
    ——————————————————
    Bullcharger,
    I’ll just roll my eyes as I can tell you probably feel protests that burn business’ down in their own cities or blocking innocent people from going to work with road blocking protests are good and changes things.

  23. If I was the coach of the team playing against them, I would change my teams fight song to the national anthem, and hire a band to play it after every first down, touchdown, kickoff, or just whenever I felt like it.

  24. Kudos to the Bay Area Football League. Hopefully they were able to teach these kids the lesson that their parents and coaches failed to teach them.

  25. The correct message to send to young people is that kneeling for the anthem is like boycotting freedom…the flag represents freedom…so protesting the flag is like protesting freedom….it makes as much sense as a gay person claiming their sexuality is a choice…

  26. It’s sad to see so many people care more about a stupid song and a flag than ACTUAL PEOPLE! What is wrong with people? It pisses you off more that someone kneels during a song than it does people being killed by cops? I guess smh

  27. This is how the media plays it. Who is he victim, apparently it’s who you decide so you can teach us what our values should be. Are the residents of NC the victim after they had millions in business pulled out of state due to a law passed in the state senate? Nope, only the left warriors whom fight for your cause. If you truly believe that people are oppressed in this country you need to travel to a communist, third world country (mideast) or just better educate yourself about world affairs! America is the least prejudice country in the world, can we be better of course, but the melting pot/US constitution combination is one of the greatest achievement in modern times – open your eyes!

  28. atumx says:
    Jun 23, 2017 8:18 AM

    All Kap did wrong
    Was not stand for their song?
    Kap pointed to their shame
    They say just play da game?
    They say Kap has no right
    To point to the sight
    That he sees every night
    They say ignore the blood that we shed
    The problem is all in Kaps head?
    So now all they can say
    Is Kap was no good anyway?
    __________________

    Hang on let me put my beret and sunglasses on….ok….snapping fingers, coffee house style…yeah man toootaallly dig it! LOL Thank you for a great laugh this morning…maaaaaannnn!!!

  29. “unlike the unemployed-for-no-valid-reason quarterback”????

    Really??? Because he’s not a starting caliber QB, and a back-up is not worth the headache or price tag. He also doesn’t seem committed to football, more interested in activism (if you can call I guy that doesn’t quite know what he’s fighting for or even bother to vote an activist). Sounds like perfectly valid reasons to me.

  30. Why would you play the national anthem at a youth football game? What other business plays the nation anthem when you show up for work?

  31. I think playing the national anthem (the Olympics excluded) at any sporting event is a waste of time.

    That being said, kaepernick still sucks as a QB.

  32. Hopefully they learn that while they have a right to do whatever, there are also consequences to them that are NOT against the law.

    Just ask Kaepernick.

  33. atumx says:

    All Kap did wrong
    Was not stand for their song?
    Kap pointed to their shame
    They say just play da game?
    They say Kap has no right
    To point to the sight
    That he sees every night
    They say ignore the blood that we shed
    The problem is all in Kaps head?
    So now all they can say
    Is Kap was no good anyway?
    =============================

    Play “da” game? It’s “the” game.

  34. Give these kids some credit. They have minds of their own. They watched the Castile footage and didn’t like what they saw. That would make them exactly like my own 10 year old son, who saw the footage before I did, and came to me with it. That would also make them exactly like my 12 year old nephew, who’s father is fairly conservative. In other words, you want to believe these kids were “led” because it enables you to keep denying how simple it is to see that there’s racial injustice in episodes like the Castile shooting and that the protests are valid.

    But yeah…making ‘merica great again and all that there…go ahead, keep your heads in the sand.

  35. Ahhh the Bay Area. Where the filthy rich live among the extreme poor, or as far away as they can push them. Great Leadership up there!

  36. herealtrenches says:
    Jun 23, 2017 3:20 PM
    Give these kids some credit. They have minds of their own. They watched the Castile footage and didn’t like what they saw. That would make them exactly like my own 10 year old son, who saw the footage before I did, and came to me with it. That would also make them exactly like my 12 year old nephew, who’s father is fairly conservative. In other words, you want to believe these kids were “led” because it enables you to keep denying how simple it is to see that there’s racial injustice in episodes like the Castile shooting and that the protests are valid.

    But yeah…making ‘merica great again and all that there…go ahead, keep your heads in the sand.
    ——————————————————-

    no one doubts they are affected by what they see in the news today. The point is it is more likely than not that they were either emulating Kaepernick or they were led by an adult. Either way what they did is no more effective than what Kaepernick did and is equally offensive to those of us that support America for what it is. We got problems? Hell yeah but a bunch of children not standing for the National Anthem changes nothing, sends the wrong message and breeds another generation of ignorance. Want them to make a difference? tell them to stay in school, get an education, contribute, participate, vote, organize and support what they believe in. That drives change, that’s ‘Merica

  37. @greggallman

    What does it change? It raises consciousness. If you don’t think that matters then you’ve got it all wrong.

    And if you claim you “support America for what it is,” then don’t forget: America is a place where freedom of speech is a pillar principal of our society. You recommend that they “organize and support what they believe in.” Well, that’s what they did. So you’ve got to support these kids, man. They’re politically aware. Good for them. It’s embarrassing that their team was barred from its league last year. That’s not my America.

  38. ebr362 says:
    Jun 23, 2017 10:11 AM
    bullcharger says:
    Jun 23, 2017 9:15 AM
    ebr362 says:
    Jun 23, 2017 8:45 AM
    I blame the coaches for this stupidity, 11-12 yr olds have little clue other than playstation. To use them for a statement is shameful and if they did it on their own, shame on the coaches for allowing it. Deeds, not grandiose symbolisms change a culture, if I was their parent I would be pissed that my son just lost a year of his football growth for some senseless grandstand. Go out and actually make a difference.

    —————–

    Regardless of you feelings toward the chosen method of protest, you are completely wrong about 11-12 year olds having no clue. They are very in tune with what is happening related to racial issues and most likely have a more progressive view then many adults. They also are in tune with social injustice. While the rest of us are slogging away at our jobs, kids are learning. They are taught to demand to be treated fairly and equally and they are taught to stand up for what they believe in.

    So, sure, disagree with how they chose to protest, but listen to them, because they are pointing out a real problem. Give them some guidance on how they can “Go out and make a difference” to address the issues they care about.
    ——————————————————
    Bullcharger,
    I’ll just roll my eyes as I can tell you probably feel protests that burn business’ down in their own cities or blocking innocent people from going to work with road blocking protests are good and changes things.

    —————–

    Did you even read what I wrote? That’s the exact opposite of what I said. I’m saying that the issue the kids are protesting for is real and if they are taking the wrong approach then maybe help them figure out how hey can make a difference, not just say they don’t know what they are talking about.

    What you just said is completely offensive nonsense.

  39. bullcharger says:
    Jun 23, 2017 10:03 AM
    If you assume that the protest method was the wrong approach, do people agree that there is actually an issue with racial injustice or do people think there is no issue?

    Thumbs up if you think there is an issue and thumbs down if you don’t.

    27 48

    ———–

    There’s the basic problem.

    Most people commenting on this site don’t believe there is any racial injustice.

    We are talking about Kaepernick and now those boys regarding whether their protest is un-american, but it’s only a small part of the issue. Many people do not believe that any protest regarding racial injustice would be valid, because they don’t believe it exists.

  40. If you find you are being treated unfair because of your race, you can go back to your “homeland” and try to be able to do what you have here over there.

    Good luck.

    Fat chance.

  41. Way to help raise yet another generation of degenerate scumbags. Great example you’re setting there.

  42. laserw says:
    Jun 23, 2017 6:01 PM
    If you find you are being treated unfair because of your race, you can go back to your “homeland” and try to be able to do what you have here over there.
    Good luck.
    Fat chance.

    —————

    So if you were born in America and your parents were born in America and your grandparents were born in America and your homeland is America, what are you supposed to do if you feel like you are being treated unfairly due to your race?

  43. therealtrenches says:
    Jun 23, 2017 5:03 PM
    @greggallman

    What does it change? It raises consciousness. If you don’t think that matters then you’ve got it all wrong.

    And if you claim you “support America for what it is,” then don’t forget: America is a place where freedom of speech is a pillar principal of our society. You recommend that they “organize and support what they believe in.” Well, that’s what they did. So you’ve got to support these kids, man. They’re politically aware. Good for them. It’s embarrassing that their team was barred from its league last year. That’s not my America.
    —————————————————–
    Common response. Parse my words and choose what you wish to comment on. Never said they couldn’t exercise their freedom of speech. Never said I didn’t support them. Actually said I didn’t doubt they were affected. I do doubt they are informed enough to understand the entire situation and speculate that they were likely emulating as we often see young kids do. I wouldn’t call this ‘organizing to support’. I would again speculate, and is often the case with something like this, that one or two kids got hyped up, hyped up a few more and then we get group think. It is not uncharacteristic of kids this age to do something that is more selfish(look at me) than for the greater good, they just don’t have the full context and understanding of information to do so. So no it doesn’t necessarily raise my conscious. You didn’t comment on my final thoughts of how these kids can make a real difference that provides the foundation for a progressive and positive future instead of another oppressed generation.

  44. bullcharger says:
    Jun 26, 2017 10:25 AM

    laserw says:
    Jun 23, 2017 6:01 PM
    If you find you are being treated unfair because of your race, you can go back to your “homeland” and try to be able to do what you have here over there.
    Good luck.
    Fat chance.

    —————

    So if you were born in America and your parents were born in America and your grandparents were born in America and your homeland is America, what are you supposed to do if you feel like you are being treated unfairly due to your race?

    ——————————–

    You tell me…I was laid off from a state job after getting veterans preference. I was told my position was being eliminated, and therefore, my services were no longer required. Alas, the job existed for the black woman that started the very next day.

    So do I feel like I was treated unfairly due to my race? Heck yeah. I lost my pension, my benefits, and everything I worked very hard for. Just because of my “white privilege”

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