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Report: Clinton Portis was ready to kill a man who lost his money

Reuters

Former NFL running back Clinton Portis wouldn’t have been the first player to have lost most of his career earnings.

But he came perilously close to making things much worse.

According to a story by Brian Burnsed of Sports Illustrated, Portis was considering killing one of his former managers who was responsible for losing millions of dollars.

Portis was sitting outside a building with a gun, and had to be talked out of shooting the man by a friend.

“It wasn’t no beat up,” Portis told the magazine. “It was kill.”

He added that if he hadn’t been calmed down before seeing the man: “We’d probably be doing this interview from prison.”

Portis made $43.1 million during his career with Denver and Washington, but most of it was either spent or lost through bad investments and alleged withdrawals from his accounts without his consent.

He’s filed multiple lawsuits against former financial advisers, and was caught up in a Ponzi scheme. He filed for bankruptcy in 2015, and acknoweldged that he spent too lavishly during his heyday.

“Portis was on a different level,” former teammate Santana Moss said. “He didn’t think about tomorrow.”

At least someone intervened before he made matters worse, or his tomorrows might have been spent behind bars. Portis is now living in an apartment in Virginia, where he does some television work for his old team.

“Most people would have offed themselves if they had to deal with what I had to deal with,” Portis said. “Life is so much clearer after coming out of that storm.”

The story features a number of disturbing details, and should serve as a cautionary tale to other players.

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62 Responses to “Report: Clinton Portis was ready to kill a man who lost his money”
  1. DitkasHair says: Jun 28, 2017 2:25 PM

    Dumb Dumb Double-Dumb!!!

  2. eazeback says: Jun 28, 2017 2:28 PM

    its a sad story that it too often re-lived time and time again

  3. winningisabrees says: Jun 28, 2017 2:32 PM

    B R U H 43M in bad investments. im pissed when my IRA loses 1K, and I move stuff around. SMH,

  4. Trust No One says: Jun 28, 2017 2:34 PM

    It’s hard to feel sorry for someone who has squandered millions with nothing to show for it…

  5. patsfan4lifesbchamps says: Jun 28, 2017 2:38 PM

    Tell you what, Portis is a better man than me. They would have had to dig me out of whoever stole my money.

  6. richardshermanhaschickenlegs says: Jun 28, 2017 2:38 PM

    I wonder how people would feel if the owner of a team had contemplated shooting a player who cost him a mint (i.e., Bosworth, Leaf) without performing?

  7. dlw492 says: Jun 28, 2017 2:40 PM

    I remember seeing him eating at a restaurant down here Miami, he was with a bunch of girls… But you could tell he wasn’t too happy… He’s one of favorite players from the U… Hope life turns around for him

  8. patfic5 says: Jun 28, 2017 2:41 PM

    Look in the mirror.

  9. richardshermanhaschickenlegs says: Jun 28, 2017 2:41 PM

    He’s a numb skull. I would venture to say he burned $5 in a strip joint for every $1 his Advisor lost.

  10. kneedragr says: Jun 28, 2017 2:41 PM

    NFL players are such easy marks. It must be awful for players like Portis, living month to month, watching the men who ‘invested’ for them park their 100k cars in front of their 1M+ dollar homes. Tough lesson to learn.

  11. gbpackersfan12 says: Jun 28, 2017 2:42 PM

    It’s amazing the NFL can’t figure out a way to help these guys from the start. Taking one class isn’t enough during Rookie orientation. Too many of these guys are blowing Millions and end up bankrupt. Put something in place that forces them to get educated and save money for the future.

  12. ipskipskyblue says: Jun 28, 2017 2:43 PM

    You can leave the U but the U never leaves you.

  13. boysroll says: Jun 28, 2017 2:44 PM

    These guys are blundering idiots……Synder will hire him to take his clothes to the cleaners and wash/polish his limo….lol.

  14. kliplee says: Jun 28, 2017 2:47 PM

    I know many of this audience is going to be lamenting how another athlete lost all of his money. However I think we should all take a moment to consider how embarrassing and frustrating it must be. He lost money investing with NFLPA Approved financial advisors, he was not entirely reckless ala Allen Iverson. He was misled by his own union into a ponzi scheme. Also, for him to speak out and open up to his struggles is a bold move, and I feel that he is doing the right thing by potentially offering even more financial literacy and insight to future athletes. Let’s not hate on the guy, he’s gone through enough. Cheers.

  15. softhelmet says: Jun 28, 2017 2:51 PM

    On behalf of it players, the NFLPA should do a better job screening out the scumbags that take on the role of financial adviser for players. We hear stories like this far too often.

    I know ultimately it’s on the player, but it looks like there are too many sharks in the water. NFLPA probably should institute some sort of random screening on these advisers to check on their activities.

  16. I prefer my Crush to be Orange says: Jun 28, 2017 2:52 PM

    I’m not saying it’s right, but I understand.

  17. Sal Tynuts says: Jun 28, 2017 2:54 PM

    $43,100,000.00

    GONE

  18. tdskinz says: Jun 28, 2017 2:54 PM

    A fool and his money are soon parted.

    Damn shame, no one to blame other than himself.

  19. lingsun54 says: Jun 28, 2017 2:54 PM

    I still remember Portis saying about Vick, “They’re just dogs”. Can’t say he doesn’t deserve everything he got.

  20. buckstalion12965 says: Jun 28, 2017 2:58 PM

    I’m betting the vast majority of the ‘lost money’ was spent by Portis himself. Accept responsibility for your own stupidity.

  21. bencoates57 says: Jun 28, 2017 2:59 PM

    Writ large, who hasn’t wanted an armed march on Wall Street and the entire industry that destroyed the American dream and the wirkd economy in perpetuity?

  22. dirtydrynn27 says: Jun 28, 2017 3:05 PM

    Clinton thank god for your level headed friend!!!!

  23. tennesseeoilers says: Jun 28, 2017 3:07 PM

    I’ll never forget how Clinton Portis was the one guy who went public immediately to defend Michael Vick’s dog fighting ring, claiming it was no big deal … just a cultural thing.

  24. saints737 says: Jun 28, 2017 3:09 PM

    Flaunting the high life, flashy cars, IRS troubles, gambling debts, owing support to a multitude of different women….

  25. mickmars says: Jun 28, 2017 3:09 PM

    For the life of me I sill can’t fathom how someone can make 43 million over say an 8 year period,and yet have no clue how much they have in assets at a given point in time. I feel bad for these guys, but maybe look in the mirror for allowing it to happen in the first place too,while you’re contemplating shooting somebody….

  26. psousa1 says: Jun 28, 2017 3:13 PM

    When you make that kind of cake their is no reason to ‘invest’. You put it in a low risk mutual fund and that is it.

    Let your 10mill make you $200k over the next 12 months.

    No restaurants, car washes, nightclubs – nothing. But I guess that’s not sexy enough.

    You don’t go to some small private guy and definitely not a ‘friend of a friend’.

  27. weepingjebus says: Jun 28, 2017 3:20 PM

    Sweet flashback photos of the four time league Outfit MVP, but leaving out Dolemite Jenkins and Southeast Jerome tarnishes his legacy far more than investments in a Ponzi scheme and shady casinos. And you call yourselves Sports Illustrated.

  28. fmlizard says: Jun 28, 2017 3:36 PM

    Letting people manage your money in general is madness to me. Take your signing bonus and buy:

    A big ass cool house of your dreams (because that will retain value and provide shelter)

    A couple fun toys like expensive cars or a boat (no more than 3-4 in total…it’s all a man can really use)

    A large position in an index fund.

    Portis would have more than $40m to his name now if he only did that. And he wouldn’t have to plot murder against Vanguard.

  29. aldavisisthenfl says: Jun 28, 2017 3:42 PM

    …where’s his Mother now? who was always shooting off her mouth about how great her son is/was…..she probably got her greasy hands on his $$ as well…or when the money ran out so did she…..smh

    oh and those stupid outfits he wore, what a tool…

  30. lyfordjr says: Jun 28, 2017 3:46 PM

    “should serve as a cautionary tale to other players…”

    Should. Won’t.

    “Experience is the school of mankind, and they will learn at no other…”
    – Edmund Burke

    It’s not like this lesson is a) new, b) subtle, c) hard to foresee, or d) any of the above. History is replete with examples. A man who learns from the experiences of others is already acquainted with the Portis problem. Adding Portis to the list of examples won’t help those who don’t…

  31. lordliftedme says: Jun 28, 2017 4:15 PM

    Like someone who wrote above me said, why the need to invest with people you don’t even know. Just save your money and live off the interest. SMH

  32. chetlemonbasketcatch says: Jun 28, 2017 4:16 PM

    “Most people would have offed themselves”? No Clinton.. most people put on their pants and go to work and feed their families

  33. broo53 says: Jun 28, 2017 4:17 PM

    Claiming others would have “offed” themselves if they went through his poor life of making $41M is sad and reckless. He loses his money so he may now be in a similar place as normal humans and he spouts of murder and suicide. This is the stuff that shouldn’t even be reported on by the media.

  34. commentcentral says: Jun 28, 2017 4:18 PM

    When you have that kind of money you don’t need to invest it.

  35. goooooobrowns says: Jun 28, 2017 4:27 PM

    … but he didn’t kill the man. That right there is something he should be very very thankful to that friend that talk him down for the rest of his life.
    Money comes, money goes, but life in prison suuuuucks to no end. He gets to lie down and wake up in his own bed. He can get a coaching job somewhere, get his needs met and be relatively happy. It’s important to reflect on the times we almost (really and truly) lose everything because of something as fleeting and vexing as money gained and lost.

  36. tangotwo22 says: Jun 28, 2017 4:29 PM

    I would love to have the names of his former managers published….those white guys should be punished!

  37. ibillwt says: Jun 28, 2017 4:30 PM

    What can you say? He’s stupid. A shame, but he’s stupid.

  38. wartface says: Jun 28, 2017 4:43 PM

    I read a story a couple of years ago about a young player that had been in the NFL for about 3 years. His mother was his money manager and he was still driving the old worn out car he had in college. Mom had him on an allowance too.

    Big Momma said you aren’t going to be broke when you can no long play football. Everyone needs a momma like her!

  39. unnamedsources says: Jun 28, 2017 4:48 PM

    Should’ve had a fall guy…

  40. nyneal says: Jun 28, 2017 4:49 PM

    I don’t feel one bit sorry for Portis or any other pro athlete who loses all his money. It says in the article that Portis squandered away a lot of it. So — it’s all on him as far as I’m concerned.

    These players graduate from college but come out with nothing other than a ticket to the NFL if they’re good enough. They aren’t smart enough to realize it’s a helluva lot easier to go through a lot of money than it is to earn and keep it.

    Good for Portis. Now go out and try to make a living like the great majority of us do and see how you like it.

  41. nyneal says: Jun 28, 2017 4:52 PM

    tangotwo22 says:
    Jun 28, 2017 4:29 PM
    I would love to have the names of his former managers published….those white guys should be punished!

    _________________________________________

    White guys??? What has their race got to do with anything? And — here are their names — decide for yourself if they are all white guys:
    A trio of financial advisers—Jeff Rubin, Jinesh Brahmbhatt and Fuad Ahmed—allegedly steered Portis toward faulty investments that resulted in millions lost for the former running back.

  42. boiler72 says: Jun 28, 2017 4:59 PM

    Most of these guys have about 50 family members who suddenly think they’re owed money, because someone made it to the pros. This is what happens when people over-breed.

  43. realfootballfan says: Jun 28, 2017 4:59 PM

    I love the hindsight police. How many of you knew how to pay taxes on houses when you were 20 or taxes period on your money? How many of you had credit card debt out the you know where when you were in college? How many of you went to Vegas or on spring break on your credit cards. But yep, these guys are supposed to be different because they were way richer, lol. One thing I hate is a hypocrite, and judging by America’s debt problem in general, there are a whole lot of them commenting on this story. The fact is that someone stole from him, which is never cool. On top of that, the NFLPA approved the person who stole from him and put him in bad investments when he was 20 something years old.

  44. hitman21st says: Jun 28, 2017 5:00 PM

    broo53 says:
    Jun 28, 2017 4:17 PM

    Claiming others would have “offed” themselves if they went through his poor life of making $41M is sad and reckless. He loses his money so he may now be in a similar place as normal humans and he spouts of murder and suicide. This is the stuff that shouldn’t even be reported on by the media.

    —————————————————————-

    What he said wasn’t wrong. There have been plenty of people who committed suicide after losing all their money. When the stock markets crash big there a good number of investors who kill themselves. It’s not the making $41M. It’s when it’s gone after being mismanaged.

  45. gorilladunk says: Jun 28, 2017 5:04 PM

    When Emmitt Smith was very early in his career, he asked Jerry Jones if he could sit in on some of his business meetings to learn. Now you may dislike Jerry, but he can turn a nickel into a dollar and obviously Emmitt paid attention. Players should talk to the owners and GM’s of their teams and LEARN how they handle their dough.

  46. davew128 says: Jun 28, 2017 5:11 PM

    softhelmet says:
    Jun 28, 2017 2:51 PM
    On behalf of it players, the NFLPA should do a better job screening out the scumbags that take on the role of financial adviser for players. We hear stories like this far too often.

    I know ultimately it’s on the player, but it looks like there are too many sharks in the water. NFLPA probably should institute some sort of random screening on these advisers to check on their activities.
    **********************************
    The NFLPA has its own advisor program (and a pretty solid one) but there is no requirement that any player gets an advisor from that program. The blame here falls on the player and the crook who stole from him, not the union.

  47. Marc in Bakersfield says: Jun 28, 2017 5:29 PM

    It would not have been all bad if he went through with it. It would have served as a stark warning for other scam artists who want to defraud NFL players, and I know that if I was on the jury I would have handed him a very light sentence given the circumstances that the individual had stolen a large sum of money from him, I would have even considered a not guilty verdict since its very hard to be an NFL player with people trying to steal your money and he may have sincerely thought he saw the financial advisor reaching for a gun and feared for his life.

  48. KCFinfan says: Jun 28, 2017 6:54 PM

    This isn’t an NFL problem, its an American citizen problem. I don’t see schools teaching money classes or investing classes or teaching about taxes and taking care of your money. Parents need to do a better job of teaching their kids how to keep a budget, balance a bank account, save their money, invest in a 401k etc. It’s no wonder the majority of Americans don’t have $500 in savings for an emergency.

  49. drunkraider says: Jun 28, 2017 7:26 PM

    I dont feel bad for him what so ever, he had 43 million !! i could retire off just one of those millions.

    go get a job like the rest of us poor suckers out there. you blew your lottery ticket.

  50. bobonit says: Jun 28, 2017 7:34 PM

    I believe this is called Premeditation and could have easily landed him in jail, hopefully this interview doesn’t invite the authorities in.

  51. defscottyb says: Jun 28, 2017 7:34 PM

    Life ain’t funny when you got no money.

  52. Dreaded Parakeet says: Jun 28, 2017 8:13 PM

    No doubt he behaved foolishly with lavish spending, women, and spending lavishly on friends and family. He admits it so that’s the first step to righting his listing ship. But it was the advisor that took the bulk of his wealth.

    You tell em to just put it in the bank if you are not investment savvy, etc. He did and still the advisor went into his bank account and took the money. It was theft yet they didn’t go to jail. That would make anyone crazy if you have millions stolen from you.

    This is just another lesson that athletes refuse to learn. It should also serve as a warning for professional scam artist that someone may just shoot you dead for your bad deeds.

    Also the financial advisor’s name is out there. If he ends up dead, Clinton will get a visit. Maybe he shouldn’t have been so candid.

  53. bigbenisabigbaby says: Jun 28, 2017 8:23 PM

    And now we are bailing him out?????

  54. footballfan72 says: Jun 28, 2017 9:30 PM

    All you making judgment. Walk one day in his shoes. To quote Sublime “Then you might know what it’s like”

  55. svanablak says: Jun 28, 2017 9:57 PM

    I’m a long, long die-hard Hurricanes fan but, I cannot feel ANY way about portis! How can you NOT be a better money manager? No matter how much a person makes be it $10 or $10 million it’s still addition, subtraction, division & multiplication! No need for quick cash schemes when you’re making that kinda loot! Triple A bonds, low return money mkt, tried & true fast-food chains! Anything except strip clubs, cars, clothes and HOES!!!!!

  56. ZcodeSportSystem.com says: Jun 28, 2017 10:04 PM

    Glad someone talked him out of taking someone else life.

  57. drunkraider says: Jun 28, 2017 10:56 PM

    guess he should of taken some business classes on that free ride to collage.

  58. onebuffalove716 says: Jun 28, 2017 11:34 PM

    There’s a bigger problem at stake here. This happens to many people regardless of income.. time to make basic financial stuff part of every day school programs

  59. tx526 says: Jun 29, 2017 1:10 AM

    Once a Cane, always a Cane.

  60. bigoldred says: Jun 29, 2017 6:05 AM

    I think the money was lost in bad investments, not stolen. Under the laws that cover these things, either he had to give them blanket control (stupid) or agree/sign on each particular investment. There aren’t many mainstream investments where you could lose all your money. It’s the funky stuff, like a wind farm or a bingo parlor (that was either T.O. or Ocho Cinco), where everything goes away. So, yes he was stupid by not learning a bit, or just lazy.

  61. tyorkiv03 says: Jun 29, 2017 6:35 AM

    “Most people would have offed themselves if they had to deal with what I had to deal with” No most people would have done what they do every day and keep on pushing even though they can barely make ends meet. I seear most of these guy dont think b4 they speak. Poor rich ffotball player who earned 43 in his short carrer and we supposed to feel sorry for him. Gtfoh

  62. absolutevisuals says: Jun 30, 2017 2:52 PM

    Finicial Advisers aren’t obliged to look at for your best interests, most people don’t realize that. Just because they have “Finicial Adviser” as a title does NOT mean they should be trusted.

    What they actually want is a Fiduciary.

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