Matthew Stafford continues to have “no timetable” for new deal

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In his negotiations with the Lions, quarterback Matthew Stafford hold all the cards. And he knows it. And he feels no need to put any of them on the table.

Via LionsLowDown.com, Stafford reiterated on Saturday that he has “no timetable” for doing a new deal. He used the same term last month when discussing the situation, and he has shown no sense of urgency to get something done.

He has no reason to. With more than $100 million in career earnings, another $16.5 million due this season, and a franchise-tag number of $26.4 million for 2018, Stafford can just sit back and wait for events to unfold.

Thanks to Kirk Cousins, who has become the Lewis and Clark of the year-to-year approach, Stafford now realizes that he would make more than $100 million from 2018 through 2020 if tagged three times by the Lions. And why wouldn’t they tag him three times? They currently have no other options, and it’s not like they could easily find another Matthew Stafford, barring another 0-16 season.

Unlike young players who have never realized a major payday, Stafford doesn’t have to pounce on a discounted deal now. He can wait it out, and with each passing day he gets closer to a three-season sequence that could see him turn the quarterback market on its ear and then hit the open market at 33, with more than $200 million in career earnings and maybe other $150 million to still make.

15 responses to “Matthew Stafford continues to have “no timetable” for new deal

  1. I don’t understand how the recent narrative of “QBs should be pushing for max dollars” you’ve been peddling, is good for any team? Perhaps I’m naive, but putting $40 million a year into a QB (a third of a team’s salary cap) doesn’t make it even remotely possible to pay talented players for the other 50+ roster spots.

    You keep spinning up these articles where players should find a way to squeeze every possible dollar out of a team (which surely is great for that player, I will definitely not argue) – at which point, there’s not much left to go around for anyone else to finance a competitive team, and that is BAD for the NFL as a whole…

  2. Thank you Mike Florio…. I’ve been saying here over and over that Captain Kirk Cousins has just revolutionized the way QBs and really every great player should negotiate….

    It used to be the franchise tag benefited the team more than the player….now it’s been flipped to the point where even a marginal starter could conceivably use the franchise tag figures to negotiate…. seeing as Tom Brady seems to be the only player concerned with winning football games… everyone else should just stop beating around the bush and demand that every contract negotiations begins with the franchise tag figures…

  3. Anddddddd, he could suffer a career ending injury in 2017 and never see any of that ‘guaranteed’ money of possible future franchise tags too.

    No one wants to see that, but that IS the flip side to that coin.

  4. I don’t know about Stafford being one of the best QBs in the game, but I sure as hell would like to be his financial planner.

  5. No where close to being a great QB. Stats are inflated due to volume but can’t win against winning teams, can’t make it to the playoffs and has an overall losing record as a starting QB. Perfect fit for Lions fans. Pay the man!

  6. QB wins against winning teams and/or in the Playoffs is one of the dumbest stats that I hear parroted over and again.

    Football is a team sport. Generally the QB gets too much credit for wins and too much blame for losses. That said, if you don’t have a good one, you really don’t have a chance in this league.

    Stafford is a Top Ten talent. You don’t let those guys walk.

  7. I would put him firmly in the top 15. Top 10 is a stretch.

    I’d love to see him break out this year and win a playoff game at home, Detroit deserves that. I don’t think it is very likely though.

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