The importance of considering Ezekiel Elliott’s side of the story

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Domestic violence is illegal, abhorrent, and despicable. Those who commit it should be exposed, shamed, and incarcerated. But those accused of it should not be presumed to be guilty, especially if they were never arrested or charged.

When it comes to NFL internal investigations, the initial outcome also should not be presumed to be fair and accurate. It’s a degree of patience and caution that has become justified by bungled, ham-handed NFL investigations of recent years, from the Saints bounty scandal to the cap penalties imposed on Dallas and Washington to the Ray Rice debacle to #Deflategate. All too often, the NFL (like many other large business organizations) selects a desired outcome in such situations and works backward to justify it.

Whatever anyone thinks of Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott, the NFL’s past handling of internal investigations should at a minimum prompt a willingness to keep an open mind, to listen what Elliott has to say, and to be willing to poke holes in the facts, findings, and logic applied by the league.

That attitude likely won’t earn me any friends at 345 Park Avenue (if I have any), but it’s a clear consequence of the manner in which the league has Machiavellied its way through other investigations, at times ignoring common sense and reason to make the square peg of P.R.-driven justice fit in the round hole of reality.

Here’s the first clue that maybe a healthy dose of skepticism is warranted before concluding that Elliott did what they now say he did (apart from, you know, the fact that he wasn’t arrested or charged): One of the four experts who participated in the Commissioner’s advisory panel for the Elliott case is Mary Jo White.

For Saints fans, that name has nearly the same connotation as Ted Wells does for Patriots fans. Five years ago, the NFL hired White to serve as a supposedly independent evaluator of disputed facts and evidence regarding the bounty scandal. At one point, she met with multiple reporters and reviewed what she decided was “overwhelming evidence” of Saintly guilt.

Here’s the piece of “overwhelming evidence” many regarded as a smoking gun, as explained at the time by Peter King: “The NFL Films-recorded quote from defensive lineman Anthony Hargrove, as first reported by SI in March, with Hargrove saying to defensive teammate Bobby McCray, ‘Give me my money,’ after Vitt told the team that Favre was out of the game with a leg injury. (Favre did return to the game without missing a play, but that wasn’t apparent when Hargrove made his declaration to McCray.)”

The problem with White’s insistence that Hargrove said “give me my money” is that careful, objective assessment of the video and audio leads to the fair conclusion that it’s inconclusive, at best, that Hargrove said the words. After watching it over and over and over again, I personally became convinced that he didn’t. Making White’s claim even more problematic is that she defended the conclusion that Hargrove said “give me my money” by saying “you can see his lips moving.” The video did not support that interpretation, at all.

The league later retreated from the insistence that Hargrove said “give me my money,” but the zealous, and erroneous, effort by White to put words in Hargrove’s mouth raised real questions about the overall credibility of her work, since it created a fair impression that she was serving not as an independent evaluator of the evidence but as an advocate for the league’s preferred outcome.

While the bounty scandal had more fundamental flaws (including, as former Commissioner Paul Tagliabue explained in his ruling scrapping the player suspensions, an effort to change a widespread NFL cultural dynamic by catching one team and hammering it with discipline), the effort by White to sell the strength of the case by insisting Hargrove said something that he didn’t obviously say became, at least for me, a key moment. Once I realized that Hargrove didn’t say “give me my money,” a little switch flipped in my typically limited brain. That was the moment where I decided that I wouldn’t just assume that whatever the league says in disciplinary matters is truthful and accurate. Those statements and claims from the league may ultimately be truthful and accurate, but I resolved at that point to resist the urge to say, “Well, if Big Shield says it, it must be true” and to look critically and carefully at every nook and cranny of the proof in order to ensure that everything makes sense.

Now White is back on the scene, hired once again by the NFL to provide opinions, insights, and perhaps eventually explanations regarding the strength of the league’s evidence against Elliott. Although there’s no reason to assume that there definitely will be a repeat of her inaccurate claims from 2012 (apart from the fact that she previously made an inaccurate claim in 2012), it’s a reminder that there are always two sides to the story, but that the league strongly prefers that its side be accepted as truthful and accurate, no matter what.

It will be harder to look at both sides of this case than it is in other cases. Elliott is accused of domestic violence; any effort to push back against the claims made against him will, at some point, feel like a failure to properly support the victims of domestic violence. Perhaps that makes it even more important for Elliott to receive a fair shake.

Also, it will be easy while trying to understand Elliott’s position on the situation to assume that the league is right by asking, “Why would the league want to make one of its brightest young stars look like a criminal, especially if he didn’t do it?” But that ship sailed two years ago, when the league tried to make one of the greatest players in the history of the sport look like a liar and a cheater, absent adequate proof that he lied or cheated.

The ultimate lesson from multiple botched investigations is this: The league does what it wants, when it wants, how it wants. It’s one of the spoils of being the dominant and most powerful sport in America. It also makes having a willingness to ask fair questions and, if need be, push back against questionable findings even more important.

Elliott has appeal rights, and legal rights beyond that. He has not yet publicly presented any evidence in his own defense, but that clearly is coming. Before assuming that he’s guilty as charged, it’s important to consider all of the evidence fairly and objectively.

79 responses to “The importance of considering Ezekiel Elliott’s side of the story

  1. Well written article. Also another great example about the nfl and “credibility” is that they use one of their own employees, Harold Henderson, as an “independent” consultant to handle some appealls. How can employee also be an independent consultant? They’ve redefined the word independent.

  2. “Before assuming that he’s guilty as charged, it’s important to consider all of the evidence fairly and objectively.”

    It is highly unlikely we will be party to ‘all of the evidence.’
    In the absence of it Elliot’s questionable judgement in other instances and the league’s total lack of credibility in most every instance combine to make it easy for people to come down on whichever side they favor. The most telling single thing I have seen supporting the league’s decision were the words of the city prosecutor, “we generally believed her for all of the incidents.” The reason it is worth some credence is simple, he is an objective 3rd party that had access to all statements and evidence. The most telling thing supporting Elliot’s position is the league office is thoroughly untrustworthy.

  3. Let’s not assume that he is innocent either. Pulling a girls top down and grabbing her breast in public is not normal behavior. Just from that incident alone an investigator would have a difficult time believing anything this guy tells him. Zeke made a choice and a poor choice in doing this in public knowing that he was being investigated at the time. This girl had every right to file charges against him for that incident. Let’s not think that this liberal site needs to protect him because he an athlete, a Dallas Cowboy, or because this site has a history of siding with the Ray Rices, or Kapernicks of the NFL.

  4. Roger Goodell’s National Integrity League has a long history of anything but integrity, honesty or transparency. When the league opens its mouth the only thing that usually comes out is lies. The vast majority of fans realize this at this point. Goodell and his cronies will manipulate anything they want to help a handful of teams that are on his preferred list.

  5. Thanks for writing a piece about this that appears to Actually Be fair and balanced.
    Such a thing is so rare these days.
    I’d like to hear some names, (if possible) regarding who might replace Goodell when his contract eventually spontaneously combusts.
    This article is a breath of fresh air.

  6. The NFL, imho, has become so much about parity that it seems to despise greatness. Why else punish Brady? If Goodell had his way he’d probably end the end of year awards. Again, just my opinion, but something is just not right. He also bends over way too far backward to prove his fairness.

  7. As a Saints fan I thank you for pointing out a few of the holes in the “bountygate” scandal. When Goodell originally claimed that the Saints had a bounty system in place he stated that the NFL had 50,000 pages of evidence to support his findings. He also said that the evidence would be released in due time. To date, not ONE one of those 50,000 pages of evidence has been released. None of the hits in question were even penalized or deem illegal by in game officials. there still is no verifiable evidence that Saints players were paid or given incentive specifically to injure players. The allegations were more or less perceived as fact before the investigation, completely souring public perception before the organization even got a work in. My opinion is that I truly believe Goodell used bounty gate to deflect attention from the players upcoming concussion lawsuit. His lap dogs in the media ate it up and there was minimal coverage of the lawsuit during that time.

  8. All of you people that defending Elliott are disgraceful. I bet you wouldn’t feel the same way if it was your sister or daughter. There is still a victim in all of this.

  9. I’ll be interested in reading the evidence the league has. As Florio writes, the league has lost all benefit of the doubt with objective fans. Those fans that relied on ESPN and league leaks for their info on deflategate think Brady and the Pats are cheaters. Those that actually read the Wells Report, the Well Report in Comtext, the appeals transcript and Judge Berman’s decision see it for the distasteful sham that it was.

  10. well said Florio. There is a clear problem with the way the NFL handles “investigations”. Yet they continue bad management of these issues. It seems to be a recurring problem that will eventually result in the league’s failure once it happens to enough teams around the league.

    Like Ricky from The Trailor Park Boys says… what comes around is all around.

  11. The NFL is very PR conscious as evidenced by the photo of the pats fans with Goodell that was staged and then circulated much to the surprise of those Pats fans. The Kaepernick issue, no matter what side you are on, has been a PR nightmare for the NFL. What better way to restore the NFL’s image than to take a tough stand on a domestic violence issue involving a star player. A player that has definitely done some questionable things, Zeke seems to be an easy candidate to be smeared. Finding Zeke guilty is better for the NFL’s image than absolving him—and the only confidence that I have is that in the end the NFL will do what is best for them.

  12. Remember this was investigated for over a year and it dealt with more than one incident, not just domestic violence. Remember there are pictures, remember this took place over a week time, remember fights at bars, remember pulling a clothing item off a women. A lot to poke holes in for not guilty.

  13. Wow – excellent article (and I don’t say that very often)!! I love the rhetorical, “Why criminalize a future star?” comparison to, “Why trash a future HoF as a liar and cheater?” – brilliant!

  14. Well done Florio. Really, the NFL rolled out Mary Joe White again? I find that hard to believe, but I guess she needed something to do and rubber stamping “The Shield” is a perfect job for her. Just do a Google search on her, it is pretty interesting stuff. I am not a conspiracy theory sort of person, but I could REALLY conjure one up involving her.

  15. The prosecutors told his lawyer they thought the girl was lying (so no charges).

    The NFL investigators told his lawyer they thought the girl was lying (according to his lawyer and the NFL has not disputed it).

    A witness signed an affidavit stating the girl had planned it.

    Six game suspension? Why?

  16. As long as goon boy Goodell is running the show Elliot’s side of the story doesn’t matter. Just like Brady and many before him. Goodell has a predetermined out come before he goes into it. This is a NFL Union issue and it’s something to that has to change before next NFL/Union agreement. Goodell can’t be judge jury and executioner !!!

  17. Zeke created this mess, not the NFL. IF you play with fire your gonna get burned. You are learning this the hard way young man. And if you did hit her, it is only a matter of time before you do it again and ultimately shamed out of the league.

  18. Lol. He’ll lose in court because this has already been litigated. It’s not about proving he did anything. It’s about his overall personal conduct, from exposing a woman’s chest, to possibly punching someone in the face, to the multiple DV allegations. The league has a right to discipline its employees…that’s s matter of settled law.

  19. The NFL has over stepped its authority and become judge, jury, and executioner. They found this young man Ezekiel Elliott guilty of a crime without a jury of his peers. By finding Ezekiel Elliott guilty of domestic violence they have smeared his name and label him a criminal. The NFL has also said that they are the judiciary system that operates under their own laws. The judiciary (also known as the judicial system or court system) is the system of courts that interprets and applies the law in the name of the state. The judiciary also provides a mechanism for the resolution of disputes. Has Ezekiel Elliott been a model citizen? No. But what the NFL has done in this case is taken away the rights of its employees and replaced it with Nazi justice.

  20. There will ZERO league credibility in any investigation until Goodell is gone. And I never liked the cowboys and even less when Jones took over.

  21. One of the best articles I’ve ever read on here.

    Goodell needs to go, it’s that simple

    Now that Kraft and Jones are both livid maybe it will happen.

    And the Saints got screwed also…

  22. Because the league office can’t be trusted, even die-hard Cowboy haters can’t enjoy this fully. I want to be glad Zeke got dinged by the league but I can’t because the league has proven itself to be capricious and unfair in these sorts of things. Additionally, they aren’t forthcoming with evidence so that we can make an informed decision about their judgment.

  23. The players union needs to negotiate an out in their next agreement with the NFL, something like, “No suspension or fine if the player is not arrested or charged. When they are, the league can evaluate the evidence provided by law enforcement to add their own punishment as outlined in the agreement”. It’s obvious that they can’t leave it entirely in Godell’s discretion as he is too ham-handed. If there’s not enough evidence to indict or even arrest a player, there shouldn’t be enough to punish him. PERIOD

  24. Mr. Jerry Jones is reported to be outraged at this suspension. His fans aren’t too impressed either, with what now totals 4 teammates suspended by the league, and two more about to be. Thought the NFL draft combine was a weeding-out process for un-desirables. That’s a lot of knuckleheads to slip through.
    Mr. Elliott may not have laid a hand on her during the one incident in question, in which no charges were filed. But apparently there are other incidents of mis-behavior with ladies. He does need to take a time-out and look at himself.

  25. Beautifully written article. The fact that Godell still has a job is troubling. Let’s for a second forget Zeke’s case and focus on the Saints fiasco and the Patriots debacle. With that kind of track record, why is this buffoon still employed? That kind of performance certainly warrants termination. The league will never have any credibility as long as this guy is in charge. Fire him and work towards gaining back your credibility.

  26. I might not be able to prove he did this, but anyone can prove he’s a bad dude and probably deserves punishment even if not for this particular crime. His character is well documented and he needs to get hit.

  27. This is one of Florios best.

    In the NFL letter I already feel there is some wordsmithing that sounds odd. In it they say they EXAMiNED lots of photografic and digital eveidrce plus “thousands” of text messages etc etc. Then there is more talking and then at the end they say the concluded. Nowhere do they actually state there was evidence of the crime. That is not to say there might not be some but if there is they should be able to say what it is.

    I really dont know if he is guilty or innocent and have no problem with the book being thrown at him if he is guilty. But I would really like to know for sure he is if thats what I am being asked to accept. This is now the first time the NFL has given their decision and released a bunch of statements statimg their version of facts while kerping the transcripts and facts themself under seal. (There is a unicorn in this box, I am not going to show it to you but it should be good enough that I am telling you there is). In the past when transcripts got unsealed the depth of the NFL’s dishonesty in their statements from what the truth was turned out to be shocking. So really unless they can show what the evidrnce was we are just left taking the words of proven liars that any exists. Again, I am not declaring Zeke innocent, just not willing to say I know he is guilty either.

    Again, good article Florio. Real good.

  28. He’s not in jail because Buckeye greats don’t get arrested in Columbus. See Seminole’s in Tallahasee and Gators in Gainesville. These kids get away with murder…and assault.

  29. Mike, here’s another angle for you on the NFL’s goal seeking

    By suggesting he may not have cooperated fully but also saying they did not penalize him for that, the NFL has created a win-win

    all fans are now biased bc he’s guilty as charged and if you have a doubt, the NFL has planted the lack of cooperation seed so you automatically assume guilt-proving evidence was destroyed

    but the league has no need to defend the unmade lack of cooperation charge and EE is now in the untenable position of needing to defend and undermine a charge that wasnt made – he can never win that argument

    very sneaky move by the NFL

  30. PrincePaul says:
    August 12, 2017 at 12:39 pm
    All of you people that defending Elliott are disgraceful. I bet you wouldn’t feel the same way if it was your sister or daughter. There is still a victim in all of this.
    ——————-
    There is definitely a victim. After reading about prosecutors stating that they believed she was lying, her friends stating in her affidavit that what she claimed happened on at least one occasion didn’t actually happen and medical examiners stating that the bruises appeared to be from a time when Elliott had no contact with the accuser, It’s looking like it’s Elliott that’s the victim.

    It’s always best to watch the response to the suspension, if the NFL has so much damaging evidence, you’d expect an appeal, but weak statements in response. Elliott’s camp doesn’t appear to be real concerned about whatever the NFL thinks it has coming out.

  31. I have no idea whether the allegations are true or not, but I am sure that Zeke,as a result of the NFL’s determination (unlike that of the police), will always be viewed as an abuser of women.

  32. Fair or not, this may be the best thing to happen for Zeke. He is obviously immature, so this could be a quick grow-up awakening. Nip it in the bud.

    But Goodell must go.

  33. If I didn’t know for a fact that his coaches at Ohio State covered up for this guy numerous times to milk his talent I might somewhat agree with the premise of this article. But they did and I don’t.

  34. I always read comments on these sort of pieces and some amaze me. I have no idea if Elliott is guilty but there is one thing I know FOR A FACT. He DID NOT grab the woman’s breast at the St. Patrick’s parade in Dallas. He DID pull down her top. If you can’t distinguish between the two, you’re as blind as Stevie Wonder and as stupid as a rock.

  35. PrincePaul says:

    August 12, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    All of you people that defending Elliott are disgraceful. I bet you wouldn’t feel the same way if it was your sister or daughter. There is still a victim in all of this.

    Thanks Paul. Your check is in the mail.
    Sincerely
    John Mara and Lisa Friel.

  36. This is outrageous…He is being suspended with no evidence…Blah, blah, blah. Sucks when it’s happening to your team, huh?

  37. Thank God the NFL did not investigate the Duke the lacrosse case. They would all be considered rapists. Just saying.

  38. Although I’d agree with the premise of the NFL doing whatever it wants and having a nearly infallible stance to do it, I don’t know that I’d build the argument that the NFL investigators should have more transparency and accountability on the back of Ezekiel Elliott. He’s a proven commodity for making the wrong choices in treatment of women – a black eye the NFL already owns and has to continually fight. Even erring on harsher punishments for these morons who put themselves in these situations. Pulling a woman’s top down publically on camera? That just shows a complete lack of a moral compass in how to treat women. Viewing all the evidence in the case at hand here is already publically tainted wit his own choices.
    Six games is fair, if not a little soft. I hope he learns from it. I’d rather see these guys sit out a full season, have a diminished game product, and in turn have them make more responsible decisions instead of continuing to be the spoiled athletes that believe consequences don’t apply to them.

  39. False accusation of sexual assault

    In the summer of 2002, BRIAN Banks was arrested and charged after classmate Wanetta Gibson falsely accused him of dragging her into a stairway at Polytechnic High School (Poly) and raping her. Faced with a possible 41 years to life sentence, he accepted a plea deal that included five years in prison, five years of probation, and registering as a sex offender. Wanetta Gibson and her mother Wanda Rhodes sued the Long Beach Unified School District, claiming the Poly campus was not a safe environment, and won a $1.5 million settlement.In March 2011, Gibson contacted Banks on Facebook, met with him, and admitted that she had fabricated the story. Banks secretly recorded Gibson’s confession, but she refused to tell prosecutors that she had lied so she wouldn’t have to return the money she and her family had won in court. Nevertheless, with Gibson’s taped admission and help from California Innocence Project attorneys, Los Angeles County prosecutors overturned Banks’ conviction on May 24, 2012.[18]

    On April 12, 2013, the Long Beach Unified School District announced it was suing Wanetta Gibson for $2 million in an effort to recoup the $1.5 million she received, along with attorney’s fees and punitive damages.[19] On June 14, 2013, the school district won a $2.6 million judgment against Gibson, which includes the $750,000 settlement initially paid to her along with attorney’s fees, interest, and $1 million in punitive damages.[20]

    Banks now serves as a spokesperson for the California Innocence Project and is working on a documentary about his story.

  40. gorilladunk says:
    August 12, 2017 at 5:28 pm
    I always read comments on these sort of pieces and some amaze me. I have no idea if Elliott is guilty but there is one thing I know FOR A FACT. He DID NOT grab the woman’s breast at the St. Patrick’s parade in Dallas. He DID pull down her top. If you can’t distinguish between the two, you’re as blind as Stevie Wonder and as stupid as a rock.
    ___________________

    Let’s see how you like it when someone pulls your daughter’s top down in public…

  41. tbisgod says:
    August 12, 2017 at 3:06 pm
    I love the continued references to deflategate, because we will always argue it, no matter how many games we win. We can never erase it. Kraft and Pats fans will always love Florio coming to our defense. Its a Pro-NE website, we all know it…and love it. Thanks again, Mike. You know which side your bread is buttered on. 19-0.
    _________________________________

    19-0 reminds me of 18-1…

  42. At times God gives great physical skills to those he gives little else. NFL players top the list.

  43. bighoser says:
    August 12, 2017 at 1:49 pm
    The players union needs to negotiate an out in their next agreement with the NFL, something like, “No suspension or fine if the player is not arrested or charged. When they are, the league can evaluate the evidence provided by law enforcement to add their own punishment as outlined in the agreement”
    __________________________________

    Ha! Players would just be paying off victims left and right.

  44. PrincePaul says:
    August 12, 2017 at 12:39 pm
    All of you people that defending Elliott are disgraceful. I bet you wouldn’t feel the same way if it was your sister or daughter. There is still a victim in all of this.

    ——————
    I actually think automatically presuming guilt from just an acvusation and without having seen any evidence is whats disgraceful. How would you feel if someone suddenly told everyone you beat them but you hadnt. Would you want them to hold off unless proof could be shown or would you be ok with being punsished for it because one person said it and another person said they had proof but couldnt share it with anyone? (And lets also assume if this other person had said such things in the past then got exposed as a liar) I dont think anyone is defending DV, they are just wanting to be sure it took place before anyone gets punished for it. And I think thats the point Florio is making too.

  45. Yeah Elliot has appeal rights and his appeal will be heard by either Goodell who levied the suspension, like Brady’s, or a Goodell flunky. As for his legal rights the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit has already ruled that the NFL can do anything it wishes concerning player punishments b/c of the players CBA contract. Goodell is the NFL’s prosecutor, judge, jury and executioner which is the way the owners wanted it for Brady but now one of those owners is stomping his feet and holding his breath. HA HA!

  46. Panel of 4 found the evidence to be overwhelming…appeared to agree with the woman the author does not find credible. This was not a knee jerk reaction and Elliot’s case was made. So the folks who heard all the evidence came up with a unanimous conclusion but poor Zeke?

  47. bkostela says:
    August 12, 2017 at 6:20 pm
    tbisgod says:
    August 12, 2017 at 3:06 pm
    I love the continued references to deflategate, because we will always argue it, no matter how many games we win. We can never erase it. Kraft and Pats fans will always love Florio coming to our defense. Its a Pro-NE website, we all know it…and love it. Thanks again, Mike. You know which side your bread is buttered on. 19-0.
    _________________________________

    19-0 reminds me of 18-1…

    ————————-

    18-1 is one heckuva great season. Especially when most teams struggle to even get 10 wins most of the time, only one team has ever done that consistently over any 15 year stretch.

  48. Maybe the NFLPA should hold out longer at the next CBA. Obviously the owners won the last one,…as they keep chipping away at the union. The result appears to be Goddell making 20 mil a year and weilding absolute power as judge , jury , and executioner…..

  49. bkostela says:
    August 12, 2017 at 6:19 pm
    gorilladunk says:
    August 12, 2017 at 5:28 pm

    Let’s see how you like it when someone pulls your daughter’s top down in public…

    __________________________________________________________________________________

    For crying out loud, can we drop this charade? There is a HUGE difference between this idea of a “victim” having her top pulled down in public and what happened at that parade. In no way am I trying to “shame” the girl or defend Zeke, but if you think for one second that the girl wasn’t there enjoying flashing everyone then you’re an idiot. #1 she already had beads around her neck in the video most people have seen (where do you think she got them?) #2 There is at least one other video readily available where she is flashing people, and #3 you can CLEARLY see in the main Zeke video that she motions to her chest multiple times while pointing at Zeke to suggest (in my opinion at least) that she wants him to do it. Her reaction simply came from the fact that she wasn’t expecting it to happen.

    People want to use this as an example of Zeke being some sexual predator just running up on unsuspecting young women and bearing their chest. Get real. This was a case of a girl enjoying herself, flashing crowds, and Zeke participating. They were in the same group, continued to party together, and she publicly declared that it was not a big deal.

  50. “Let’s not assume that he is innocent either.”
    Whaaat? Presumption of innocence is a basic tenet of U.S. justice.

  51. I think there is plenty of room for Elliot and Komissar Goodell to both be in the wrong. That said, 4 games should’ve been sufficient (and appealed to 2).

    Hopefully Elliot learns his lesson that this is the post-Ray Rice NFL, and especially at RB – you are typically only good for 5 years and then replaceable like the old parts of a lawnmower.

  52. harrisonhits2 says:
    August 12, 2017 at 12:27 pm

    Roger Goodell’s National Integrity League has a long history of anything but integrity, honesty or transparency. When the league opens its mouth the only thing that usually comes out is lies. The vast majority of fans realize this at this point. Goodell and his cronies will manipulate anything they want to help a handful of teams that are on his preferred list.

    ————————————————————————————————-
    Very true.

    Roger Goodell was even working to manipulate public opinion this past week with the staged photograph with him posing with Patriots fans.

    And here are few things which show anyone with more than 2 working neurons that Roger Goodell duped so many willfully ignorant gullible sheep:

    • Scientists from universities all over the USA sent a document to the court indicating that the weather explained the football deflation.

    • There are videos available online where you can watch footballs deflate from cold temperature. Even without getting the footballs wet the footballs deflate….so no wind chill factor, no evaporative cooling and no stretched leather and the football still drop PSI. One video can be found by searching on the popular online video site for: “DEFLATE GATE & WHY SCIENCE SAYS THE PATRIOTS DID NOT TAMPER WITH FOOTBALLS”

    • Roger Goodell is still demonstrating the direct opposite of integrity by hiding the PSI information which was collected during the 2015 NFL season. Hiding that PSI report is also goes against the “transparency: that Roger Goodell pledged in 2014.

  53. Does anyone besides the “tolerant” (and weak) cowboy’s fans think that this guy is not capable of these allegations? He exposed a woman’s breasts in public as a prank! Give me a bleeding heart break!

  54. PrincePaul says:
    August 12, 2017 at 12:39 pm

    All of you people that defending Elliott are disgraceful. I bet you wouldn’t feel the same way if it was your sister or daughter. There is still a victim in all of this.
    ——————————————————————–

    Nobody is defending anybody. Of course, nobody condones domestic assault. You’ve reached a conclusion based on the NFL? Think about that for a moment…let it sink in.
    He wasn’t charged with a crime outside of the NFL.
    Basically, your telling us, that we should look to the NFL for justice? After deflatgate, I came to the conclusion, based on fact, that the NFL operates in fantasyland…one where the laws of physics don’t apply.
    Now, did Zeke do some wrong…perhaps. He has a small history of bad behavior. Not sure if I am ready to throw him to the lions, especially based on NFL ‘findings’.

  55. Very well written. A couple of issues and of facts that I believe are relevant. Investigations like these are difficult processes, especially after
    a fair amount of time passed. To find witnesses even 6. Months after an iincidendent that involves primarily college students is even more difficult
    As Mr. Florio reminded us …the NFL and Mary Jo White have bumbled their way through prior investigations.
    Another factor that concerns me is Roger Goodell’s inability to accept the fact that any process or findings he participates in, makes is never
    flawed or incorrect. Bottom line is that the very trait that perhaps made him is the also the flaw in these investigations.
    The fact that an appeal courts cannot actually review the facts and findings ultimately empowers Goodell. The appeals
    court only examines the procedural process not the decision.
    I believe that is why the NFL ultimately has rested their decision on a simple phrase, the NFL ” generally ” believed the victims version of facts than Elliot’s. In the Brady case the NFL stated that they found that Brady ” generally ” knew that
    Patriots employees were tampering with the balls.
    This use of the word ” generally ” has a huge impact and limits Elliot’s appeal rights.
    If I were Elliot’s counsel I would unfortunately work toward some settlement which hopefully
    would reduce the suspension but surely would force Elliot to make some sort of statement taking some responsibility .
    for his actions.

  56. PrincelessPaul,

    Happy w would you feel if that was your son being wrongly accused? Before YOU pass judgement, look at some facts. The NFL admitted that she fabricated a story that he pulled her out of a car and started beating her. She has pictures with bruising, but doesnt mention she was in a bar fight the night or 2 before this ALLEGED/She lied incident. Her own friend said she made that up, im agaist domestic violence, but had one if my family members accuse another of this and she lied. It has seperated our family for 20 plus years, so Princess, before you go tree huggin tommorow, its innocent intil proven guilty. For the record, if they have evidence, which they dont, or he sdmits it , i am fine with the suspension. He has made a few knuckleheaded decisions since being in the league, suspend him for that. Btw, his dad released some texts today from her saying im white, you are black they wont believe you. Im offended, and im not black. She deserves no sympathy for being one of those who are chasing money wo any care of the world. So keep defending this liar, in fact you deserve each other, you would make a great couple until she does it to you!

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