Ezekiel Elliott suspension traces directly to Ray Rice

Getty Images

He hasn’t taken a snap in the NFL since 2013, but he continues to haunt the league, its teams, and most importantly their employees.

In a dizzying two-month window from late July to late September of 2014, Ray Rice’s domestic violence case nearly brought down a Commissioner. And the effort to ensure that matters of domestic violence will never again threaten the $40 million-per-year throne has become a significant threat to the annual income of the men who play the game.

At the time of Ray Rice’s initial punishment (which happened before the elevator video emerged), the NFL had a standard practice of suspending players two games for first-offense domestic violence. When Rice was suspended only two games, fans and media unleashed a hue and cry that caught the NFL by surprise, forcing it to change the baseline suspension for first-offense domestic violence to six games.

Then came the release of the notorious knockout video, which frankly didn’t show the NFL anything the NFL didn’t already know. The aftermath nearly brought down the Commissioner. After that, the league decided that it would never again defer to the criminal justice system, and that it will always conduct its own investigation in order to ensure that a player who gets the benefit of the doubt in a court of law when perhaps he didn’t deserve it doesn’t get the benefit of the doubt in the Court of Big Shield.

Three years ago, Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliot would have faced no scrutiny at all from the league if he was never arrested for or charged with domestic violence. Today, thanks to the Rice situation, Elliott faces the loss of six game checks, partial forfeiture of his signing bonus, elimination of his future guarantees, significant loss of endorsement income, and the scarlet letter of domestic abuser.

If Elliott committed domestic violence, he deserves to be punished. But when a player (or any employee of any company) has an incident away from work and during the offseason and the player is never arrested for it, why should the NFL care?

The NFL cares not because it’s good for business to care, but because it’s very bad for business to not care. While it’s fine that the NFL does care, it’s not fine that the NFL uses an in-house investigative process that operates under a grossly reduced standard of proof with ultimate decision-making authority in the hands of the man who saw the bunglings of the Rice case nearly bring him down. Given those circumstances, is anyone surprised that the league will now err at all times on the side of branding a player guilty?

The nation’s justice system was founded on the notion that it’s better for 10 guilty men to go free than for one innocent man to be wrongfully imprisoned. The NFL’s justice system seems to stand for the notion that it’s better for 10 innocent men to be punished too much than for one guilty man to punished not enough, since when that one guilty man is punished not enough the league office ends up under siege, and the man in charge has to suddenly fret about his own job security.

All of it traces back to Ray Rice, and his decision to punch Janay Palmer in the face in an elevator that had a camera in it. If that never happens, Elliott would never have gotten suspended.

77 responses to “Ezekiel Elliott suspension traces directly to Ray Rice

  1. There’s a bunch of Monday Morning QB that goes on with NFL discipline. I think they are doing what most people would considering the position they are in. Do nothing, then at some point down the road the womans photos of bruises get leaked and we complain that “the NFL saw these photos and did nothing because he wanted to help out his friend Jerry Jones”. If he disciplines him based on the standard of “probably” people complain that its not fair.

    Well, isn’t it okay to just understand the complexity of the situation and know that no matter what they decided to do, the oposing side would have legit and rational thoughts on why they should have done the oppositie. It just is what it is at this point in 2017. Not sure anyone commenting on here could handle this without there being some loud and legit “backlash” from one side or the other.

  2. Exactly, I think the Ray Rice over reaction from the media and the public is directly affecting this Elliot “allegation”

  3. this is not all that accurate

    rice was never going to be suspended at all, which is why
    goodell claimed he needed to see a tape, a tape he did not have the power to procure, which was also a lie.

    the truth is, if baltimore was forced to cut rice, they’d take a 9.5 mil
    cap hit in 2015, which means
    flacco and rice both would take up 30 million in cap money

    this is why even the suspension of 2 games took so long..they were hoping people would forget the image of rice dragging her out of the elevator, the season would start and a cover up and pay offs would
    go down

    once outrage built, the 2 gamer became reality and then even
    more outrage

    also, bisciotti has a membership to augusta where he golfs with bisciotti, so goodell was asked to do a favor.

    and that is on top of goodell not wanting to weaken baltimore, a team
    known to challenge the pats in the afc

  4. “err at all times on the side of branding a player guilty” and “If that never happens, Elliott would never have gotten suspended.” Are you kidding me? First of all, after a year long investigation they found evidence of abuse, no erroring there at all. And to say without the Rice situation he wouldn’t have been suspended at all is just plain hogwash. There have been several other high profile cases of domestic abuse since then, and not just in the NFL, that have raised awareness of the issue enough that he most certainly would have been suspended. May have been a lesser suspension, but in today’s society you are not getting away with beating a woman. Not even in the NFL.

  5. There will never, ever be any confidence in the fundamental fairness or objectivity of any disciplinary procedures so long as Goodell is Commissioner.

    He is forever compromised by previous conclusive demonstration of poor judgement, bias, fabrication of evidence, the lack of any truly independent investigative or appeal process, and the dishonesty of secretly feeding false information to selected media members who are under the financial control of his office.

    He alone created this situation and until he is dismissed, it won’t change.

  6. There is no “smoking gun” in the Elliot case, the Rice case has the video.

    If anything, there is evidence in the Elliot case that points toward the whole episode being made up by a jilted lover.

    Goodell has made the NFL the “laughing stock” of professional sports…

  7. If Elliott committed domestic violence, he deserves to be punished. But when a player (or any employee of any company) has an incident away from work and during the offseason and the player is never arrested for it, why should the NFL care?
    ——————————————————————————–
    Because it’s the human thing to do.

  8. If I was Roger I would announce that we are presently dropping this Elliot investigation due to a lack concrete evidence.

    I would also announce it would be re-opened if any more NEW evidence surfaced.

  9. Elliott isn’t simply a jerk. He’s got loose screws in his head. Not the first time he’s been in trouble for anti-social behavior and won’t be the last.

  10. I’d like to see NFL’s policy to be in line with MLB. Like the NFL, they use the “more likely than not” standard of proof. There are no minimum or maximum penalties, the commissioner has authority to suspend a player as long as he wants, and a player can be suspended with pay during an investigation and forced to pay it back. However, all appeals are decided by an arbitrator.

  11. The Ezekiel Elliot suspension traces directly to Ezekiel Elliot and an established pattern of behavior that makes him visibly suspect, it’s duration traces to Ray Rice. The furor over it can be laid directly at the feet of a league office completely lacking in credibility. We’ve reached a point where we are conditioned by experience to distrust. Goodell and his minions. They have been disingenuous about so much for so long that if the league put out a release saying tomorrow is Tuesday most of us would be inclined to think it was Wednesday until we checked a calendar.

  12. The Ray Rice issue brought to light the league being lax when it came to domestic violence. The NFL now has protocols in place that were used in the Elliot suspension. What are you trying to say with this article I have no idea? Do you want to go back to the old ways and bury domestic violence issues. The league doesn’t have to prove anything to a jury where the richest guy wins. The leagues investigated Elliot and found merit to the allegations against him. End of story.

  13. The nation’s justice system was founded on the notion that it’s better for 10 guilty men to go free than for one innocent man to be wrongfully imprisoned.

    No it’s not.

  14. Everything In this article is true, but still it hasn’t resulted in anything different than try to make the NFL look like it’s tough on domestic violence. This doesn’t explain the Josh Brown case last year, which was way after the NFL implemented the 6 game policy. He only got 1 game and the Giants knew about his guilt ! Good grief. Because of that, Zeke doesn’t get the benefit of the doubt. The problem is that each case should be handled on a case by case basis, instead the sheriff Goodell does whatever he wants when he sees fit. He’s clearly incompetent when it comes to player discipline.

  15. why did goodell not use “article 46” in the ray rice situation?

    why did he defer to the standard policy and say he saw no video (as if that mattered, especially after rice confessed)?

    why?

  16. “While it’s fine that the NFL does care, it’s not fine that the NFL uses an in-house investigative process that operates under a grossly reduced standard of proof with ultimate decision-making authority in the hands of the man who saw the bunglings of the Rice case nearly bring him down.”

    What? The NFL is s private entity. They don’t need to use a criminal or even civil standard. They have the absolute right to discipline their employees for conduct deemed detrimental. They did it to Rothlisberger. They did it to Brady. And now they are doing to to Zeke, who is accused of similar things compared to Big Ben. Goodellnis terrible, but the NFLPA gave him the power. Now they have to live with it.

  17. Where is the Josh Brown example here? 1 game suspended for 20+ incidences of DV AFTER Ray Rice? And no penalty for Mara or the Giants for not reporting it when he foound out about the DV. No, Mara RE-SIGNED Brown, and a year later Brown was suspended one game by Bozo Goodell aND no oebay whats over for MAra or the Giants. Good show of consistent behavior by Bozo.

    The Ohio PD found ZERO evidence (that was unequivocal) that tied Zeke to having committed DV afree a 6 wk investigation. ZERO. They have the accuser’s lies in text messages, but no evidence he did what she claimed, and the witnesses interviewed corroborated HIS story, not hers. Haters are on here (Packernet) saying the league found “evidence of abuse”, yet the PD could not attach her claims pf said abuse to Elliott due to a clear LACK of strong evidence. So the non-police NFL investigation is the end-all be-all when it comes to investigatory excellence? Wow….

    Witch hunts are usually wrong, and they got this one wrong without a doubt. If you are going to under-react on both Rice and Brown, and then decide to overreact later, at least make sure the evidence is 100% indisputable.

    Just another failure on Goodell’s watch, folks. Truly despicable…..

  18. This site is so amateurish it’s laughable. You clowns were the first ones to complain about Ray Rice not getting punished enough before the video surfaced. Now, when the NFL changes its policy to hand out meaningful discipline for domestic violence, you still whine and complain.

  19. Packernet says:
    August 14, 2017 at 8:24 pm
    “err at all times on the side of branding a player guilty” and “If that never happens, Elliott would never have gotten suspended.” Are you kidding me? First of all, after a year long investigation they found evidence of abuse, no erroring there at all. And to say without the Rice situation he wouldn’t have been suspended at all is just plain hogwash. There have been several other high profile cases of domestic abuse since then, and not just in the NFL, that have raised awareness of the issue enough that he most certainly would have been suspended. May have been a lesser suspension, but in today’s society you are not getting away with beating a woman. Not even in the NFL.
    ————————

    It found no iron clad evidence. At all. However, it did find the accuser to be wildly inconsistent with actual evidence (in form of text messages) of her telling her friend to lie to investigators, this after she spent the night of the 21st texting and yelling to Elliott that she was going to end his career and not to “be a dumb b____.” and mess with the “wrong b_____”. Along with her telling Elliot that “you’re a black man. I’m a white girl, no one will believe you”.

    None of this necessarily means Elliot is not guilty, but it definitely means he deserves the benefit of the doubt and for people to quit assuming he’s guilty. And please don’t bring up the parade incident. The woman in question has said she was joking with him trying to get him to do it, she was just surprised when he actually did. And no, he didn’t buy pot in the preseason, he walked into the shop to investigate. I know MANY people who have done the same, and also left without purchasing anything.

  20. Either Florio is campaigning to be the next commish or he had a few before writing what is i think the worst column in PFT history

  21. Meanwhile, there is a video of the running back in Cincinatti punching a girl and he gets rewarded by being drafted. hmmm…
    ____________________________________________________

    NFL cant punish as the act occurred prior to Mixon being a member of the NFL.

  22. If I saw evidence of Zeke committing a heinous act, then I’m all for banishment–forget the 6 game suspension. The problem with the Zeke case is that there is absolutely no evidence that links him to domestic violence. We, as a society, dont live with the threat of being misconstrued/labeled a criminal without due process, or at least without having a fair opportunity to clear our name by disputing evidence that has been presented against us. Even as employees we have the right and privilege to seek arbitration if wrongly accused or terminated by an employer, to seek not only damages but also to make it clear that we are not guilty of whatever the employer has deemed discipline worthy. No man ever wants to be labeled a woman beater, there is really not much worse than that, which is why I’m so baffled that the nfl thought it could save face by just by piecing together a string of unreliable, circumstantial pieces of evidence to support their claim of getting tough on domestic violence and plastering Zeke as a domestic abuser, when actual concrete evidence exists to the contrary. But no one should be surprised, just because a bunch of billionaires got together and decided to hire and pay a guy $40 million to run the league for them, we shouldn’t assume that he knows what he is doing or is fit to take on the role, shame on us when we’ve been shown time and time again with each bungled investigation that it is quite the contrary.

  23. I posted a comment earlier regarding Florio’s take on the foundation of our justice system. I should have also typed no it wasn’t. Our country’s legal system was not based upon the idea that he states. Where he cooked that up I do not know. But for a wee bit of historical reference, look up a Supreme Court decision about the presumption of innocence – Coffin v. United States 1895.

  24. If you have talent the rules to make money and stay out trouble are literally written for a 1st grader

  25. The irony here is that if the league had gone the other way Florio would be lambasting them for doubting the abused.

  26. What is forgotten is the idea that why would a company/team knowingly want to employ an abusive and violent personnel? Uh, talent, duh. That always precedes ethics and morality. Set aside the evidence in this case and look at the big picture. The NFL has taken steps to suspend players, who as Florio writes: “has an incident away from work and during the offseason and the player is never arrested for it” because the perception is Yhy are you drafting or continuing to pour millions of dollars in what society deems as a criminal?

    Just because a player abused his wife/girlfriend during the offseason or while in college (lets call it what it is–the NFL farm league), and they go without judicial consequences, that does not make it palatable in public opinion.

    Circling back to Elliot. Yes, the evidence is flimsy and would probably make a hard case for any prosecutor. But the Pandora’s Box has been opened. The Ray Rice situation AND the Tom Brady case has set parameters for discipline. Rice set the bar for domestic violence and public reaction; Brady set the bar from the LEAGUE’S PERSPECTIVE of tarnishing the shield.

    Is Elliot truly guilty? Does it even matter anymore? I hope he isn’t, because that means he beat on that young girl and was rewarded with a multi-million dollar career. Where’s the karmic justice in that?

    It’s not just about how things play out in public opinion; it’s also about how the NFL runs its triumvirate that consists of Goodell the Judge, Goodell the Jury, and Goodell the Executioner.

  27. painkiller20 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 9:00 pm
    Meanwhile, there is a video of the running back in Cincinatti punching a girl and he gets rewarded by being drafted. hmmm…

    ———-

    The ignorance in the Mixon incident is astounding. Do you have any idea when the incident happened? Likely not. It was 3 years ago when he was 18. Did you also know that Mixon served me a year long suspension from football in addition to community service, therapy and fines? Likely not either. Mixon and Molitar have made amends and (aside from an overblown argument with a meter maid) he hasn’t been in trouble since.

    Point is, the Mixon incident happened years ago and he has paid for it. He deserves a second chance

  28. The NFL cares not because it’s good for business to care, but because it’s very bad for business to not care.

    you know thats like the same thing right? To be plain: Doing whats good for business is good. Not doing whats bad for buiness is also good. You really should simmer down sometimes, lefty.

  29. From reading this web site of Patriot Nation, I thought all suspensions traced somehow and are to be compared to the Great Deflategate Injustice.

  30. AS MY DAD WAS FOND OF SAYING…THIS COUNTRY IS GOING TO HELL IN A HAND BASKET….CAN’T GET ANYTHING RIGHT. BETTER YET IT DOESN’T KNOW WHAT RIGHT IS ANYMORE!!!!

  31. Any time a private organization takes on the burden of investigating, presenting, judging and punishing an employee without due process it runs the risk of injustice. The NFL has stepped into a quagmire of competing business, political and publicity that opens it to enormous criticism. In Elliott’s case the person deciding credibility was not present for the statements; there is no disclosure of confrontation of accusers (a fundamental right under the legal system); no discussion of the identities and background of the investigators and contributors to the reports Goodell received (how many were black; how many had agendas to push that would impeach their objectivity); how much of the infamous metadata was open to expert investigation (remember the NFL disregarded the Ideal Gas Laws to reach a guilty verdict in the Deflategate debacle); there appears to have been no investigation into the alleged accuser trying to enlist others in a plot to discredit Elliott, etc. Fans will now be subject to 18 months of Goodell and NFL bashing. The NFL should get out of the business of investigating suspected criminal activity.

  32. wahl35 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 8:53 pm
    “The nation’s justice system was founded on the notion that it’s better for 10 guilty men to go free than for one innocent man to be wrongfully imprisoned.”
    No it’s not.
    ————————–
    Er, yes, it is. The origins of the justice system (juries, writs etc) goes back into Anglo Saxon England, but in terms of that core concept of level of proof required to determine guilt, Sir William Blackstone put forth in 1766: “Better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer.” It quickly became adopted as “Blackstone’s Formulation” across all English territories by 1787. Benjamin Franklin thought it was too lax, and suggested in 1785 that it’s better 100 go free instead of 1 false imprisonment, but Blackstone’s formulation held sway.

  33. The NFL’s justice system needs to be ripped out with a hammer claw. It’s flawed, biased and about as Anti-American as they come. Instead of being spear headed by a leader\league with integrity we are left with a buffoon filled with lack of credibility and disingenuous intent. Pathetic.

    I hope the players leave money on the table and neuter Goodell in the next CBA.

  34. truthfactory says:
    August 14, 2017 at 8:18 pm

    ==============================
    Quite simple, No. It’s not ok to do “something” regardless of the evidence since one side or the other is going to be shafted. Fairness isn’t measured on the complexity of the situation. And complacency most certainly isn’t the answer either.

    The NFL acts above the law of the land which places them under even more scrutiny. The fact of the matter is they are NOT transparent (or even a facsimile of fair). Think about it … we STILL have doubts about Bountygate, doubts about Bullygate, doubts about Rice, doubts about Peterson, doubts about Deflategate, doubts about Spygate etc, etc. Fans expect and deserve more than that. Even more so when the league thumbs their nose at the judicial system. Just sayin’.

  35. Good, most of these players think they are above the law (and they are). I’m glad the NFL doesn’t strictly go by the law and what a judge decides (or if a player pays off a victim and the case never even see’s a trial). It wasn’t one random case against ziek, when he first saw some trouble i gave him the benefit of the doubt b/c i like the dude (not a cowboys fan- but i liked him). Now it’s a pattern and multiple instances of physical violence. Give him 6 games, period. I don’t care who you are, you deserve to see a real punishment. 1 game doesn’t get the message across. It shouldn’t be that hard not to hit a woman or knock out a DJ.

  36. @filmex2000 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 9:54 pm
    Any chance that when you land on this page now, the theme to “Perry Mason” is activated ?
    ##################################################################################
    Or Law and Order…….

  37. skawh says:
    August 14, 2017 at 8:41 pm
    BINGO! Give that man a star. Ray Rice was given a permanent suspension. Zeke is crying about a 6 game suspension!?
    ========================
    Understanding of course that Goodell could suspend any player he wants for something as silly as not standing for the national anthem. Just take the suspension. What’s the big deal?

  38. sportoficionado says:
    August 14, 2017 at 10:01 pm
    ….. We, as a society, dont live with the threat of being misconstrued/labeled a criminal without due process, or at least without having a fair opportunity to clear our name by disputing evidence that has been presented against us.

    Don’t spend much time on social media I see. Also don’t watch much TV. Do I need to list all those whose jobs were ripped away over one word that was deemed offensive by some nebulous internet magistrates?

  39. There will be people on either side of this and frankly it matters. Was Zeke guilty of anything? We are going to find out because it is going to appeal and then most likely to the courts. This will be a different case than Brady’s so please don’t draw to much from that case. Brady was and is an established icon, Zeke not so much.

    The reason Zeke will take it further is just what the article indicates “loss of six game checks, partial forfeiture of his signing bonus, elimination of his future guarantees, significant loss of endorsement income, and the scarlet letter of domestic abuser” and that says he has to take it as far as he can including having the CBA changed if possible. It also appears that Jerry Jones may also be adjoining the suit, something Kraft did not do for Brady. The ramifications are going to be very defined for this case to the point that we should all get ready for a holdout with the next CBA because there is no way the players and union are going to let the status quo on decisions like this from Goodell stand.

    No matter the outcome, it is going to be a long process and those hoping Elliott will not play the 1st 6 games are going to have their hearts broken. He eventually may have to serve a suspension or maybe not but it most likely will not happen this season and maybe not even next season. Sorry it is just reality.

  40. cadreamer1969 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 5:35 pm
    harrisonhits2 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 5:00 pm

    Why would the most corrupt commissioner in modern American sports need to attend the hearings and have actual facts about the case?

    The Maras told him to suspend Elliott so he suspended Elliott, what’s hard to understand about this?
    ———-
    If you actually believe that, heaven help you.

    3 22 Rate This

    —–

    umm, one was clearly guilty, the other not so much

    are you honestly this obtuse?

  41. newmancave2016 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 9:34 pm

    What? The NFL is s private entity. They don’t need to use a criminal or even civil standard. They have the absolute right to discipline their employees for conduct deemed detrimental. They did it to Rothlisberger. They did it to Brady. And now they are doing to to Zeke, who is accused of similar things compared to Big Ben. Goodellnis terrible, but the NFLPA gave him the power. Now they have to live with it.
    =========================
    First, the commissioner has the same power now that has been in place for decades. The issue isn’t the NFLPA giving him the power. It’s trusting the current buffoon to do it in a fair an unbiased manner (something I hope the rectify in a few years). Second, any employee that is punished inconsistently and prejudicially in a flawed system will (justifiably so) deserve any resulting criticism from that action. Regardless if that employer has the right to take on that action.

  42. realityonetwo says:
    August 14, 2017 at 9:40 pm
    This site is so amateurish it’s laughable. You clowns were the first ones to complain about Ray Rice not getting punished enough before the video surfaced. Now, when the NFL changes its policy to hand out meaningful discipline for domestic violence, you still whine and complain.
    ==================================
    Probably because it’s meaningful discipline with zero to little evidence this time around. LOL

  43. babygaga19 says:
    August 14, 2017 at 9:58 pm
    Meanwhile, there is a video of the running back in Cincinatti punching a girl and he gets rewarded by being drafted. hmmm…
    ____________________________________________________

    NFL cant punish as the act occurred prior to Mixon being a member of the NFL.
    ==============================
    Somebody should probably tell Terrelle Pryor !!!!!

  44. mrboado says:
    August 14, 2017 at 10:42 pm

    Is Elliot truly guilty? Does it even matter anymore? I hope he isn’t, because that means he beat on that young girl and was rewarded with a multi-million dollar career. Where’s the karmic justice in that?

    It’s not just about how things play out in public opinion; it’s also about how the NFL runs its triumvirate that consists of Goodell the Judge, Goodell the Jury, and Goodell the Executioner.
    ===========================
    Is Elliot truly guilty?

    He’s been suspended 6 games. There really should be no doubt at all at this point. The fact there is speaks volumes as to why we are talking about it and where the state of the league (and it’s buffoon of a commissioner) is.

  45. fireroger says:
    August 15, 2017 at 9:28 am
    skawh says:
    August 14, 2017 at 8:41 pm
    BINGO! Give that man a star. Ray Rice was given a permanent suspension. Zeke is crying about a 6 game suspension!?
    ========================
    Understanding of course that Goodell could suspend any player he wants for something as silly as not standing for the national anthem. Just take the suspension. What’s the big deal?

    1 0 Rate This

    ———–

    The “big deal” is the precedent this has set. He can defame and slander a team or player and steal money from them, just because someone wants him to.

    You’re asking why that is a big deal?

    lol

    Why are Millennials so obtuse with regards to adult things and life?

  46. fireroger says:
    August 15, 2017 at 7:38 am
    truthfactory says:
    August 14, 2017 at 8:18 pm

    ==============================
    Quite simple, No. It’s not ok to do “something” regardless of the evidence since one side or the other is going to be shafted. Fairness isn’t measured on the complexity of the situation. And complacency most certainly isn’t the answer either.

    The NFL acts above the law of the land which places them under even more scrutiny. The fact of the matter is they are NOT transparent (or even a facsimile of fair). Think about it … we STILL have doubts about Bountygate, doubts about Bullygate, doubts about Rice, doubts about Peterson, doubts about Deflategate, doubts about Spygate etc, etc. Fans expect and deserve more than that. Even more so when the league thumbs their nose at the judicial system. Just sayin’.

    2 0 Rate This

    ————-

    I have no doubts about ANY of those things. I did the research and didn’t let ESPN try to tell me what the truth is.

    Goodell is a liar, a cheat and wildly corrupt. No doubts here.

  47. johnodocks says:
    August 15, 2017 at 6:50 am
    From reading this web site of Patriot Nation, I thought all suspensions traced somehow and are to be compared to the Great Deflategate Injustice.

    0 1 Rate This

    —————-

    What about the Spygate injustice?

    Just how many more injustices do we need to see as fans?

    Meanwhile, Pacman Jones is still employed in the NFL and Article 46 is nowhere to be seen.

  48. tylawspick6 says:
    August 15, 2017 at 9:56 am

    Understanding of course that Goodell could suspend any player he wants for something as silly as not standing for the national anthem. Just take the suspension. What’s the big deal?

    ———–

    The “big deal” is the precedent this has set. He can defame and slander a team or player and steal money from them, just because someone wants him to.

    You’re asking why that is a big deal?

    lol

    Why are Millennials so obtuse with regards to adult things and life?
    ========================
    I think you might need to read the post I was responding to. My response was more tongue in cheek and in line with your overall response to me. If you look at my other responses on this post you’ll see we agree it’s a big deal. A very big deal.

  49. So does PFT have the stance that as long as there is no video or other incriminating evidence leaked to them, they are ok with domestic violence against women and Elliot should not be suspended at all? You state “When Rice was suspended only two games, fans and media unleashed a hue and cry that caught the NFL by surprise, forcing it to change the baseline suspension for first-offense domestic violence to six games.” So when the fans and media forced the NFL to change the suspension to 6 games THAT was ok because we were making a difference and sticking it to the man, maaaaaaan!! but now that it has been changed and Elliot is suspended 6 games because of the change the media helped enforce, you think it’s somehow unfair now?

  50. tylawspick6 says:
    August 15, 2017 at 9:58 am

    I have no doubts about ANY of those things. I did the research and didn’t let ESPN try to tell me what the truth is.

    Goodell is a liar, a cheat and wildly corrupt. No doubts here.
    =========================
    While I respect (and largely agree) there is little doubt about those scandals that isn’t universally true. The fact many still debate if (1) balls were really deflated unnaturally, (2) Was SPeyton aware of a “smash for cash” program or not, (3) were signals really relayed in-game or not (etc, etc, etc, etc) tells you everything you need to know about the backlash associated with “just take the punishment”. But you are correct about Goodell. On every count.

  51. RedskinsItsREDSKINSflorio says:
    August 15, 2017 at 10:08 am
    So does PFT have the stance that as long as there is no video or other incriminating evidence leaked to them, they are ok with domestic violence against women and Elliot should not be suspended at all?
    =============================
    I think the short answer is, yes. Punishment without evidence is just as bad as domestic violence against women or a whole host of other deplorable behavior. Arguably even worse.

  52. Lemmy Aksyadis

    —–
    Making a lot of assumptions, And did you go through each case from those examples and find out if they were compensated or bought out of their contract? Or are in litigation for damages? I’ll make my own assumption and say you havent because you completely missed the point of my post.

  53. Question:
    De Smith and his NFLPA will fight on Elliott’s behalf to reduce the suspension. WHY has no one in the media talked about this? If/when the suspension is reduced, the media will destroy Goodell for doing so yet they NEVER mention that the NFLPA forced the suspension to be reduced. The NFLPA did the same for Ray Rice.
    Did NBC, PFT, ESPN, etc bother to ask whether the NFLPA favors domestic violence over player discipline? Clearly the NFLPA DOES favor domestic violence because they fight to reduce the disciplinary action set forth by the NFL. Hold the NFLPA’s feet to the fire on this Florio. I DARE you.

  54. dryzzt23 says:
    August 15, 2017 at 10:18 am
    Clearly the NFLPA DOES favor domestic violence because they fight to reduce the disciplinary action set forth by the NFL. Hold the NFLPA’s feet to the fire on this Florio. I DARE you.
    =================================
    Unbelievable. Question back at you …

    Does the NFLPA favor domestic violence by fighting to reduce the punishment or are they fighting the punishment because due process is completely vacant? Or is it simply because player discipline is an abhorrent mess regardless of the act that may\may not deserve the punishment. That’s what Florio is trying to point out to you and many others.

  55. Except for, ya know, Ray Rice was seen on video knocking his soon to be wife out, Zeke has evidence exonerating him, yet, he was suspended 6 games? Look, I hate the Cowboys, and Ohio State, and, well, Zeke I guess…. maybe hate is a strong word,but, I’m in now way a fan. I am a fan of justice, and I’m not seeing justice here. It’s a scary world to live in knowing you can have evidence that proves your innocence, yet, you’re still found guilty? I’m lost man…

  56. Also, it falls on the media, and the persuasiveness power they have over situations. THEY are the ones that applied the pressure, THEY are the ones that got Ray Rice blackballed (Obviously, he punched her, and he’s guilty, but blackballed?),THEY are the ones that got their pitchforks and torches and circled the powers that be. Now, Goodell should have shown some backbone, and said look, we’re a private organization, and we do things the way we do things. Nobody is going to pressure us to do things unjust, because they don’t like the way we do things. This is a free country, nobody forces you to watch the NFL, and if you don’t wanna watch, don’t watch! I understand the problem with that, is a lot of the media and news networks pay the NFL boatloads of money to broadcast the games, but the NFL was so big at that time, that they could pretty much tell anyone they wanted, to shovel it. Now, look at the mess they’ve created for themselves by folding under pressure to a majority of major media outlets, that the vast majority of them don’t give a hoot about sports anyway! They could care less about justice, they just wanna disrupt and create a “Story”. That’s all the care about, just like all politicians care about is your vote!

  57. Florio is 100% correct. He is saying that Elliot got suspended for 6 games because of the Ray Rice backlash. The media and fans freaked out when the video was released and threw a gigantic temper tantrum about how a 2 game suspension was a farce. Therefore, the nfl has to suspend Elliot for 6 games so nobody can complain that they treat domestic violence as a joke. Now that the nfl fulfilled the politically correct guidelines they are free to void Elliot’s 6 game suspension upon appeal. Since, an arbitrator hears the appeal, the nfl cannot be blamed.
    Now, from a legal standpoint it is impossible to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Ezekiel Elliot is guilty of domestic violence. However, it would be possible to convince a jury that Tiffany Thompson is lying.
    Here is why:
    1. Thompson is on record admitting that she tried to blackmail Elliot with sextapes.
    2. Thompson is on record conspiring with friends to blackmail Elliot.
    3. Thompson is on record asking friends to lie on her behave
    4. Thompson waited 3 days to come forward and talk to police.
    5. Thompson gave inconsistent and contradictory statements to the police.
    *6. Thompson had photographs taken by police that showed bruising. The only potential damning evidence.
    7. However the bruising is minor compared to what one would reasonable expect from a 6 foot 225 pound man. She also suffered bruised knuckles which corroborates Elliot’s story that she got into a barfight with a female 3 nights prior.
    8. The Columbus DA was presented with these facts from the police department and decided that the case was nearly impossible to win. In fact it would have been difficult to even have Elliot indicted. Thus, no official charges were filed against Elliot.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!