Jerry Jones on NFL’s disciplinary procedures: “You have to be fair”

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On Friday, a federal judge in Texas concluded that the league office utilized fundamentally unfair procedures when investigating and disciplining Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott. On Sunday night, after the Cowboys beat the Giants with the assistance of Elliott, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones agreed.

“This has really to do with what our league’s responsibility is given the privilege that we have as a league, then what is our responsibility to really do it in a very good and accurate or acceptable way,” Jones told reporters after Sunday night’s win over the Giants. “We certainly stand to be critiqued and examined in that area. Everybody else is. Everybody who has ever made a decision in law is. So why should it surprise us that when we adjudicate or the equivalent of adjudicate over a privilege that we’ve gotten in our relationship with players and we don’t do it in a fair way, why should it surprise anybody if we got slapped. It doesn’t surprise me. You have to be fair.”

The broader question is why does the league even bother to police the lives of players who are away from the playing field? It seems as if Jones’ position would be that it’s better to not do it at all than to not do it the right way.

“One of the things that we feel compelled is because we have such interest and we have so many people that are interested in our game and interested in different aspects of the game,” Jones said. “As a matter of fact, we work our lives, ‘And please look at us. Watch us. Watch our games. Watch our preseason preparation. Watch out training camps.’ That’s what we’ve got. We’re out here trying to create that kind of interest all the time and so when these social issues or these kinds of things come up then it shouldn’t surprise us when we’re asked to use that visibility and use that interest to basically do something for the country and society. Now, whether you do it in a way that is right or whether you do it in a way that is sensitive to victims, in many areas, whether it be bullying or whether it be domestic violence, well, whether you do that in a way that meets with approval then that’s hard. We certainly have room to be a lot better in the NFL in all kinds of issues regarding behavior, whether it be league, owners, players, players representatives, or the Players Association, we all need to do better.”

The league thinks it’s done fine, as evidenced by the decision to appeal the decision blocking the Elliott suspension to a higher court. Regardless, when one of the league’s most influential owners agrees with a federal judge that the league’s procedures weren’t fair, that’s a problem.

39 responses to “Jerry Jones on NFL’s disciplinary procedures: “You have to be fair”

  1. No, no you don’t. That’s what you and your owner buddies put into the CBA, and only the Steelers players sounded the alarm that it was a sham and gave too much authority to Goddell.

  2. You means Jerry Jones obviously disagrees *now*. He seemed pretty content with the disciplinary procedures when they were just impacting the Patriots, Saints, and other teams.

  3. Hey, Jerah… the only thing that matters is: did he beat-up the girl or not. Everything after that is irrelevant. Elliot should fess up and take his punishment like a man, learn from it and move on.

  4. bronx33 says:
    September 11, 2017 at 1:22 pm
    Hey, Jerah… the only thing that matters is: did he beat-up the girl or not. Everything after that is irrelevant. Elliot should fess up and take his punishment like a man, learn from it and move on.

    13 20 Rate This

    “Punishment” for what, though? You people who try to act tough, never can tell us what he did wrong to deserve to have paychecks stolen, just like with Brady.

    You just assumed Goodell tells the truth, and after 10 years of his lying, you still haven’t figured it out?

  5. 24601jvj says:
    September 11, 2017 at 1:44 pm
    It should be stated once again, “cross examine all parties while they are under oath.” Then some of the truth will come out.

    6 1 Rate This

    ———

    Why do you think Brady took the stand and Goodell didn’t? Goodell would be in jail right now if he testified at any time.

    Isn’t it bad enough 3 federal judges (with more coming), have called him a liar to his face in a court room?

  6. Brady’s problem is he destroyed his phone Zeke had no charges filed against him has proof she set him up and the NFLs lead investigator believes she made it up not hard to see the difference now the Saints bounty case on the other hand I could see the comparisons

  7. If the NFL was fair, these cases would have the same outcome. However, that doesn’t exist. There’s no way the league can explain with adequate reasoning as to how they initially suspended Josh Brown 1 game and Elliott 6 games. Only a few days ago, after more than a year did they add 6 games to Brown’s case and he’s not even in the league. The NFL’s logic is mind boggling.

  8. I’m still not understanding why it takes the NFL a year+ to investigate these cases, and they still can’t get them right.

  9. hockeyfan28 says:
    September 11, 2017 at 2:52 pm
    Brady’s problem is he destroyed his phone Zeke had no charges filed against him has proof she set him up and the NFLs lead investigator believes she made it up not hard to see the difference now the Saints bounty case on the other hand I could see the comparisons
    ==========================
    And the NFL still hasn’t looked at the logs from the phone Brady “destroyed” (after telling them they weren’t getting the phone to begin with). Exponent is still wondering why nobody believes the complete fabrication they got paid to produce (probably because a 5th grader debunked their entire analysis). Walt Anderson is still trying to figure out how Ted Wells can recall what gauge he used but he can’t even after doing so for 20 years.

    Nope. Despite clear evidence to suggest the NFL completely dismissed key pieces of information that would prove the allegations false there’s nothing in common with Elliot at all.

  10. I think the league is going to keep discipline as arbitrary and unfair as possible.
    Changing the format and appeal avenues will be a big chip for ownership to use in the upcoming CBA.
    Same as weed.

  11. rainsarge says:
    September 11, 2017 at 3:00 pm

    The NFL needs to drop the personal conduct policy.
    —————–

    What they need to do is apply it to the league office.

  12. suncawy says:
    September 11, 2017 at 3:10 pm

    There’s no way the league can explain with adequate reasoning as to how they initially suspended Josh Brown 1 game and Elliott 6 games. Only a few days ago, after more than a year did they add 6 games to Brown’s case and he’s not even in the league.
    ———————

    Giant’s superfan Lisa Friel is the explanation.

  13. mmack66 says:
    September 11, 2017 at 3:28 pm
    I’m still not understanding why it takes the NFL a year+ to investigate these cases, and they still can’t get them right.
    ======================
    How about spending a year+ for a lead investigator to recommend no action only to have a single committee member disregard it completely.

  14. bronx33 says:
    September 11, 2017 at 1:22 pm
    Hey, Jerah… the only thing that matters is: did he beat-up the girl or not. Everything after that is irrelevant. Elliot should fess up and take his punishment like a man, learn from it and move on.

    ———————–
    I agree with you, the only thing that matters is did he beat up that Girl. But I dont agree with you that is a given that he did. I personally found the girl not believeable at all in fact given her attempts to get others to lie to support I find it more beivable that her story is a lie. And since my suspicion is that he did not do this I cant be comfortable with anyone coming in ignoring all other investigations and recvomendations and just saying he needs to be punished anyways. I think the NFLs side in this smells. I would like to once again have a judge unseal their transcripts so I can read what really went on not just accept Goodells story on it.

  15. The broader question is why does the league even bother to police the lives of players who are away from the playing field?

    ————–

    I have the same question. Just stop doing it. And the press should stop reporting incidents where players have not been charged with a crime just to sell news.

  16. As odious a character as JJ is, he’s right. If you think the NFL can do whatever it wants about player discipline, just ask yourself why it bothered to participate in an arbitration AFTER the commish made his findings and issued his sanction. Do you think the CBA might just require it? And, arbitration by its very nature must be fair,

  17. Zeke was treated fairly. This is all on the NFLPA. They refuse to partake in any discussions when it comes to discipline it’s member. Until they are willing to do so, the Commissioner has the right and the duty to impose and enforce. I commend the Commissioner on his handling of this. He did everything he was supposed to do.

  18. As long as it is not YOUR Cowboys, right Jerrah? As long as the players being railroad belong to teams like the Patriots, Saints, and Steelers, the process is “fair,” right? You made the deal, live with it.

  19. ‘The broader question is why does the league even bother to police the lives of players who are away from the playing field? It seems as if Jones’ position would be that it’s better to not do it at all than to not do it the right way.’

    Well, there are actually Police and a Judicial system already in place for this stuff.

  20. limakey says:
    September 11, 2017 at 6:14 pm
    Zeke was treated fairly. This is all on the NFLPA. They refuse to partake in any discussions when it comes to discipline it’s member. Until they are willing to do so, the Commissioner has the right and the duty to impose and enforce. I commend the Commissioner on his handling of this. He did everything he was supposed to do.
    =======================
    Given your praise on how deflategate was handled that isn’t all that surprising. It makes sense given the fabrications and foregone conclusions. Hopefully somebody we can refactor absurdity and consider condemnation instead of commendation.

    I suspect there are very few who are condemning Goodell for “doing his job”. But to even remotely suggest the process is fair or consistent is extremely laughable. Than to suggest that problem lies at the feet of the NFLPA makes is hilarious.

  21. Fire, again you ignore the actions of Zeke and blame the Commissioner for punishing him. What if it was your daughter? You and your kind fully support the abusers and those who defend him by victim shaming. I am sure you your kind cheered and congratulated Kessler when he blamed the violence on the victim. She made him do it, huh?

  22. limakey says:
    September 12, 2017 at 10:46 am
    Fire, again you ignore the actions of Zeke and blame the Commissioner for punishing him. What if it was your daughter? You and your kind fully support the abusers and those who defend him by victim shaming. I am sure you your kind cheered and congratulated Kessler when he blamed the violence on the victim. She made him do it, huh?
    ========================
    Not at all. If he did the crime do the time. Wait! Does that still qualify me as “your kind”? I’m supporting a fair and consistent discipline process. I don’t want to have to learn 1+ year after the fact that key information was (again) withheld that dramatically alerts the facts and outcome of the discipline. Which is as true now as it was for spygate, bountygate, deflategate, bullygate, Rice, Peterson etc. It’s fine that you can claim finality that Zeke is guilty but there are a LOT of other people that justifiably can’t take that same leap of faith. And THAT speaks volumes about the discipline process not necessarily what Zeke did\did not do.

    I can assure you my daughter would never try to extort money from somebody who was emotionally\physically abusing them. They would be putting as much distance as possible between them and their abuser. Not seeking him out at a party after breaking up. Or showing up at his house. Or calling him repeatedly.

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