NFL is getting sick of “armchair doctors” and their lyin’ eyes

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The fox that is guarding the henhouse would very much like any non-poultry experts on the farm to refrain from questioning the accuracy of the chicken count.

That’s the clear takeaway from the NFL’s surprisingly strident statement regarding the Cam Newton concussion evaluation controversy. Strongly worded with the kind of condescension that typically appears only in modern political discourse, the league wants the rest of us to know that only the league knows what is best for players who may or may not have suffered a head injury.

Here’s the final paragraph from the league’s statement, a finger wag to those of us who have the temerity to trust our lyin’ eyes: “We urge restraint among those who attempt to make medical diagnoses based upon the broadcast video alone. Evaluation for a concussion requires not only an analysis of the broadcast video but an examination performed by a medical team familiar with the player and the relevant medical history. Review of this case confirmed again the vigilance, professionalism and conservative approach that is used by our NFL team medical staffs and independent medical providers. Each of these medical professionals is committed to the best care of our NFL players and is not influenced by game situation or the player’s role on the field. To suggest otherwise is irresponsible and not supported by the medical facts.”

Added NFL Chief Medical Officer Dr. Allen Sills in an EXCLUSIVE! phone call with league employee Ian Rapoport: “This points out something important. That armchair doctors at home cannot make a concussion diagnosis on video alone. . . . I think this shows how irresponsible people can be in offering an opinion without the facts.”

They could have saved time and effort by boiling the message down to three words: “How dare you.”

Oh, we dare. And this kind of attitude from the league and Dr. Sills will serve only to embolden members of the media to be even more vigilant when it comes to giving meaning to the words that the NFL proudly wears on its sleeve.

The league cares deeply about player health and safety. Until it doesn’t.

As noted in the aftermath of the Newton situation, the league has made the choice, consciously or not,  to accept media and fan criticism for allowing a player to keep playing when he possibly has a concussion over possibly more widespread criticism for removing a player from play for 10-15 minutes of real time in crunch time of a playoff game so that he can be checked in the locker room for a concussion that he doesn’t have. The league now hopes to minimize the criticism arising from not conducting a full-blown evaluation by playing the “you’re not a real doctor” card (it’s too bad they didn’t use that standard with Elliot Pellman when forming the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Committee in 1994) and essentially intimidating members of the media into not raising fair questions about whether a player should have been evaluated for a concussion not briefly in a collapsible sideline pup tent but more extensively in the slightly less chaotic confines of the locker room.

The revised concussion protocol (in the wake of the Tom Savage debacle) requires a locker-room “for all players demonstrating gross or sustained vertical instability (e.g., stumbling or falling to the ground when trying to stand).” Newton stumbled to the ground while walking to the sideline. The NFL can excuse it after the fact by pointing out that the Panthers were simply manipulating the rules to give backup quarterback Derek Anderson more time to get ready to enter the game (which is not much different than defensive players faking injuries to take the steam out of a no-huddle offense, but those kinds of glitches are “cheating” only when the league wants them to be). At the time the events are unfolding, however, it’s more than fair for media and fans to point out the possibility that the obvious evidence supports an examination of the player-patient far more aggressive and extensive than asking, “How many fingers?”

Seven years ago, Hall of Famer John Madden advocated a “when in doubt, leave them out” approach, via a memo that said this: “If you have any suspicion about a player being concussed, remove him from the game. Always err on the side of caution.” Although the provisions of that memo were never fully embraced by the league (#shocker), the most important word used in the memo is “suspicion.”

This isn’t about armchair doctors making an official concussion “diagnosis.” This is about human beings with functioning brains who are able to see that something isn’t right, and who are willing to say so.

The league’s deliberately aggressive reaction underscores the fact that something definitely isn’t right with the league’s approach to diagnosing concussions, and that the league’s chosen strategy at this point is to use tough talk to get media and fans to shrug in the face of obvious visual evidence and say, “What do we know?”

Here’s what I know: It won’t work.

94 responses to “NFL is getting sick of “armchair doctors” and their lyin’ eyes

  1. Apparently the other tools for evaluating concussions are a shovel and a bull.

    I can’t keep up, where did the NFL excuse wheel stop this time? Knee? Eye? Delay of game?

  2. I think this shows how irresponsible people can be in offering an opinion without the facts.”
    ———
    That has hands down become Americas #1 past time. Master of all trades and the jack of none.

    “Everyone is an idiot except me” mentality. I’m not exactly sure how we got here but I’ll assume the internet helped us get there.

  3. The NFL is an easy target of every self-stylized expert with an ax to grind. I don’t blame them for having enough.

  4. Wonder what they’ll say about “armchair referees”, “armchair coaches”, and “armchair broadcasters”?

    But as an “armchair owner” I’ll say that the NFL needs to make some changes in central casting…

  5. They are right and they are wrong. I have seen times where there was now way a proper diagnosis of a cuncussion could be performed like when Russell Wilson took a shot to the head got up shaky and then when instructed to go in tent he was in there for maybe 5 seconds and flung the tent up walked out upset and went right back on the field. No way there was enough time to perform a proper cuncussion check arm chair doctor or not.

  6. Does any rational decision or explanation ever come out of 345 Park Ave…

    NFL headquarters is not exactly the most prestigious hub of intellectual activity in America.

  7. Typical media whining and failure to admit they’re wrong sometimes too.
    ————–

    – “Newton stumbled to the ground while walking to the sideline.” What?!? Every single video has Newton walking/jogging normal and his right eye closed. You can see a Panthers coach in the background telling Newton to go down in the field of play.

    – The visor hitting his eye is a LEGITIMATE INJURY and was not faking by Newton. As such, he can & should stay on the field for the trainers to come out for an injury timeout. THAT IS NOT CHEATING.

    – regardless of how you feel about Goodell, the league was RIGHT. Newton was not concussed, as he PASSED the all the baseline tests.

  8. Yeah, I mean when Gronk got up woozy there’s no way we could tell he was concussed! That being the case Fraudger, why wasn’t Church put into the protocol as well? – after all, if it was helmet to helmet and we can’t be sure without proper evsluation…

  9. You can’t judge a concussion from a video but you can overturn a touchdown from one???

    HELLO anyone home at 345 Park Ave? The world is waiting.

  10. Imagine the uproar that would be caused if they determined Cam Newton didn’t have a concussion, but still pulled him from the biggest game of the season just to be safe. These same armchair doctors would be calling Cam Newton a wimp, and the Panthers would receive a lot of hate as well. This is a no-win situation for the Panthers.

  11. There are CURRENTLY SAFER helmets that exist in the Marketplace, but for reasons of sponsorship money and admission of liability the NFL won’t mandate their use.

    If the NFL cared about player safety:
    1. Safer Helmets
    2. No Thursday game UNLESS after a bye-week for both teams
    3. Expanded rosters

    Maybe the NFL needs to pay Roger more than $40MIL/year so that he can find the time to care enough to solve this problem.

  12. “This points out something important. That armchair doctors at home cannot make a concussion diagnosis on video alone…”

    Except those ‘armchair doctors’ weren’t making a diagnosis, they were simply expecting the league to abide by it’s own protocol.

  13. Yeah that 10 seconds or however long Cam was in the tent certainly allowed for a thorough diagnosis

    “How many fingers am I holding up Cam?”

    “1?”

    “Try again”

    “3?”

    “Close enough get back out there”

  14. The clamour is usually to err on the side of “that guy should get looked at” not “rub some dirt on it and get back in there”.
    Clearly the NFL is disgusted by the general public erring on the side of caution and concern for the players.

  15. While we are questioning the NFL’s credibility why not Madden too? After all he was the coach of the “criminal element”. Tatum & Atkinson
    From wikipedia on Atkinson….
    “In a regular-season game in 1976 vs. the Pittsburgh Steelers, the Raiders’ arch-rival, Atkinson hit an unsuspecting Lynn Swann in the back of the head with a forearm smash, even though the ball had not been thrown to Swann. The hit rendered Swann unconscious with a concussion.[1] Atkinson had also hit Swann in a similar manner in the previous season’s AFC Championship game, which also gave Swann a concussion.[1] After the second incident, Steelers’ coach Chuck Noll referred to Atkinson as part of the “criminal element” in football. Atkinson subsequently filed a $2 million defamation lawsuit against Noll and the Steelers, which Atkinson lost.[1]”

  16. “why wasn’t Church put into the protocol as well?”

    Church showed no signs of concussion, that’s why. Gronk clearly had his bell rung.

  17. The public relations people in the NFL are absolutely horrible. The message sent here is the opposite of what they should have tried to convey. They live off of false equivalences and horrible assumptions. When several people say “I think something doesn’t seem right and maybe player x should be evaluated for a concussion” that does not mean they are diagnosing anything as armchair doctors. The NFL parades out these standards that they hope will appease the concerns of the public and then complain when they are called out for actively disregarding the procedures put in place. To me, that seems like they can’t understand why nobody believes their “I only had 2 beers” excuse when the media pulls them over.

  18. Don’t you know everyone is an expert now? I dont want medical diagnosis being provided by someone who may or may not have eaten laudry detergent for an internet challange, getting closer and closer to that idiocracy script.

  19. It was a different game back then, the only constant is the Steelers and their fans whining and crying.

  20. Eliminate the helmet and go to a soft foam or plastic cap with a face guard, that will stop launching and make the defender wrap up during the tackle instead of using his head like a missile.

  21. Oh, OK. Watch the product, but don’t have opinions about what you see, especially if it’s smart people stuff. Got it.

    I saw Tom Savage’s arms trembling, but the professional medical evaluators did not. They missed the diagnosis. I made the accurate diagnosis from my couch (not an armchair), using video alone, and so did most fans watching. Dr Allen, you were irresponsible for offering your opinion without the facts, or worse, in denial of them. Thanks for playing, but you lose.

  22. “This isn’t about armchair doctors making an official concussion “diagnosis.” This is about human beings with functioning brains who are able to see that something isn’t right, and who are willing to say so.”
    ——————
    No, this is about media that FAILS to admit they’re wrong and often doubles down their first mistake. How many articles where posted here about Newton’s NON-EXISTENT concussion and mocking his eye injury “excuse”?!? The whole week plus more. Ans still continuing the same narrative…

    And yes, we’re still waiting for Chris Mortensen to apologize for his falsehoods in the Deflategate mess. Typical media arrogance.

  23. “Sick of …’
    I am sick of this sickening ‘sport’ of brain damage. Let me quote John Maddon, “Boom!”.

  24. AS am I sick of these armchair docs! It is football. If you don’t want the risk give up the paycheck and don’t play. You are going to get your bell runfg. many times. if you dont like it – then dont play. Whats the issue? Do we have to coddle guys who want to play a tough sport now too?

  25. Same geniuses that didn’t know a football deflates in cold weather and assumed it must therefore have been a vast conspiracy. Never forget.

  26. I might be more inclined to side with the league office, if they didn’t continually let obviously concussed players stay on the field.

  27. So basically, the NFL is saying that we need to trust them when they say that there was no need for the protocol rules to be followed?

    I’m sorry if I’m being a bit incredulous at that one, but the terms NFL and trust really don’t belong in the same sentence.

  28. Lest see what happens if Brady ever has to miss a snap for a concussion evaluation , the Northeast corner of this country would have a collective heart attack .

  29. “We urge restraint among those who attempt to make medical diagnoses based upon the broadcast video alone”
    That’s funny NFL. You remember the Ezekiel Elliott investigation ? As I recall, the NFL was able to confirm that the alleged victim, Tiffany Thompson, sustained bruises based upon photos provided by her that those bruises were, according to medical experts, the result of domestic abuse. The medical experts made no physical exam of Thompson, but went solely upon photographs. So, now the NFL wants us to believe they can’t do diagnosis based upon video, which a video has more clarity. My question for the NFL is which is it ? Can you or can you not make medical diagnosis based solely upon digital evidence ? If not, then th NFL should really try to explain why Elliott was suspended.

  30. The only team that takes concussions seriously is the pats. Championship game, Gronk is definitely needed, but correct protocols were followed. That is the first time I supported the hated pats.

  31. harrisonhits2 says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:35 am

    “why wasn’t Church put into the protocol as well?”

    Church showed no signs of concussion, that’s why. Gronk clearly had his bell rung.

    —————

    Church saw the hit coming and was able to tell his brain not to bounce off his own skull. The brain, of course, obliged by ignoring laws of physics.
    -Armchair Doctor

  32. When we see “posturing on the field” we know something is wrong. Sign of potential seizure. Why did the officials on the field not know this sign or the coaches. In that case, we all could tell from the video a brain injury occurred.
    Why is it the great doctors on the field could not come that conclusion.

  33. The NFL want armchairs until it doesn’t want them. “We don’t want your pesky opinions, unless you’ve signed up for NFL League Pass, just $432 per season! Includes unlimited armchair concussion evaluation!!”

  34. mmack66 says: “I might be more inclined to side with the league office, if they didn’t continually let obviously concussed players stay on the field.”
    ————–

    You’re so right. Gronk made some fabulous plays at the end of the Jaguars game. Oh wait, he was pulled out of the game with concussion symptoms.

    How about Tyrod Taylor’s miraculous last minute drive against the Jaguars? Oh wait, he was pulled out of the wildcard game for a concussion and replaced by Peterman.

    – But we have Travis Kelce staying in the game to help the Chiefs against the Titans, right? Not that one either?

  35. FinFan68 says:

    The public relations people in the NFL are absolutely horrible.
    ==============================================================

    That’s because the NFL PR rep was Bill Clinton’s spokesman and John Kerry’s campaign manager.

  36. I think this shows how irresponsible people can be in offering an opinion without the facts.”

    They call this “Twitter.”

    The league has it’s share of issues, but I agree with their stance on this. They have an independent Doctor on the sideline that conducts the test if necessary. Watching on camera is not the same as being on the sideline talking to the player.

  37. NFL is getting sick of “armchair doctors”

    But the NFL had not problem playing “Armchair Scientists” with their deflate-gate fiasco

  38. nhpats says:
    January 24, 2018 at 1:00 pm
    NFL is getting sick of “armchair doctors”

    But the NFL had not problem playing “Armchair Scientists” with their deflate-gate fiasco

    You’re confusing science with conspiracy to commit fraud. They had no interest in science since they knew it blew their case out of the water.

  39. And the League wonders why the viewership is declining.I have sat down in front of a TV for at least 2 games a week watching NFL Football for the better part of 52 years, minus the time I spent in the US Navy, I don’t think I have ever come as close as I am now to say what I will say next. NFL , get it righted or I may never watch a game. I have stopped watching NBA Basketball, cold turkey since the ’80s. So I know I can do it and I will.

    NFL tough talk, what’s next you going to raise the prices? lol

  40. factschecker says:

    I think this shows how irresponsible people can be in offering an opinion without the facts.”
    ———
    That has hands down become Americas #1 past time. Master of all trades and the jack of none.

    “Everyone is an idiot except me” mentality. I’m not exactly sure how we got here but I’ll assume the internet helped us get there.

    -Well said.

  41. arealisticpackerfan says:
    I’m getting sick of the NFL allowing/encouraging players to endure crippling lifetime brain damage for financial gain.

    -Seriously??

  42. ncfloyd says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:34 am

    While we are questioning the NFL’s credibility why not Madden too?
    —————————-

    John Madden, who hasn’t coached in 40 years? That guy?

  43. “I think this shows how irresponsible people can be in offering an opinion without the facts”

    Well duh. Social media was invented for a reason ya know?

  44. Concussion protocol is a joke and players know the risk. If a neurologist says you have a concussion and the player wants to keep playing, that’s on the player now.

  45. Everyone loves slamming the league office, but in this case they are right.
    Every time someone takes a hit and stays in the game everyone automatically assumes they had a concussion and were forced to stay in the game by the big, bad, mean ol’ NFL and concussion protocol failed.

    Maybe…just maybe…you can’t determine a concussion happened by watching a game on tv and they stayed in the game because it was just a hit.

  46. mmack66 says:
    January 24, 2018 at 1:19 pm
    ncfloyd says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:34 am

    While we are questioning the NFL’s credibility why not Madden too?
    —————————-

    John Madden, who hasn’t coached in 40 years? That guy?

    ————-

    Yeah….the same guy who stated that the Pats should take a knee and take the game to overtime in their 1st SB win over the Rams in 2001 season. The same game that Brady quickly drove the Pats into FG position so that Adam V could win the game.

  47. nhpats says:
    January 24, 2018 at 1:00 pm
    NFL is getting sick of “armchair doctors”

    But the NFL had not problem playing “Armchair Scientists” with their deflate-gate fiasco

    ————————————————–

    Leave it to an intellectual Pats fanboy to bring up deflategate regarding an article that broaches how the future of the game could be in peril due to head trauma.

  48. Don’t worry everyone. He wasn’t concussed he was just cheating. So everything is cool now.

    Signed,

    NFL

  49. ncfloyd says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:34 am

    While we are questioning the NFL’s credibility why not Madden too?
    —————————-

    John Madden, who hasn’t coached in 40 years? That guy?

    __________________________

    Actually, Madden was confused about what he actually said. He really said to his henchmen DB’s Atkinson & Tatum: “when in doubt, TAKE ’em out”

  50. akira554 says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:15 am

    – The visor hitting his eye is a LEGITIMATE INJURY and was not faking by Newton. As such, he can & should stay on the field for the trainers to come out for an injury timeout. THAT IS NOT CHEATING.

    —————————-

    Obviously, you’ve never seen a helmet visor in person. It sits on the outside of the helmet and held in place by 2 of the facemark mounting screws. Short of shattering, the visor cannot hit you in the eye. It was a weak BS story, and that’s why anybody who has worn or seen a visor knows it.

  51. pftreader69 says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:08 am
    Apparently the other tools for evaluating concussions are a shovel and a bull.

    ——————-
    Now thats a one liner!! Internet winner here folks.

  52. NFL’s statement is B.S. I don’t need to personally examine Case Keenum to determine he got a concussion on that famous play with the Rams-Ravens game a couple years ago. Even Stevie Wonder could see Keenum was concussed.

  53. lol @ the visor hitting his eye. Not possible. Anyone who believes that probably has a bid out for an ocean front mansion in Omaha.

  54. grant35 says:
    January 24, 2018 at 2:49 pm
    nhpats says:
    January 24, 2018 at 1:00 pm
    NFL is getting sick of “armchair doctors”

    But the NFL had not problem playing “Armchair Scientists” with their deflate-gate fiasco

    ————————————————–

    Leave it to an intellectual Pats fanboy to bring up deflategate regarding an article that broaches how the future of the game could be in peril due to head trauma.

    ——————-
    Actually its a valid point, along with the other one above anout the NFL playing armchair law enforcement with Ezekiel Elliot second guessing the real law enforement. The article is less about CTE than it is about the NFL not liking others sevond guessing them and the irony of that is something else given their own willingness.

  55. really WWNFL? Well fans are sick of your armchair refs that work part time and are so blatantly biased that its ruining the game!

  56. Satanic Hell Creature says:
    January 24, 2018 at 2:57 pm
    akira554 says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:15 am

    – The visor hitting his eye is a LEGITIMATE INJURY and was not faking by Newton. As such, he can & should stay on the field for the trainers to come out for an injury timeout. THAT IS NOT CHEATING.

    —————————-

    Obviously, you’ve never seen a helmet visor in person. It sits on the outside of the helmet and held in place by 2 of the facemark mounting screws. Short of shattering, the visor cannot hit you in the eye. It was a weak BS story, and that’s why anybody who has worn or seen a visor knows it.

    I’ll do you one better. If you take the time to look at the close ups, you could clearly see the shield was in it’s proper position and nowhere near his eyeballs. Now, if they said some of the turf pellets got into his eye under the shield, that I could buy. But that’s not the lie, I mean story, they told.

  57. There have been multiple occasions where the NFL was second guessed regarding Cam Newton and concussions, and each time the concussions tests proved to be negative. There were no concussions. I’ve also seen Cam on multiple occasions obviously faking an injury, lying on the ground for a couple seconds like he just got knocked out, only to jump up laughing. He was just trying to get the refs to throw a flag. In basketball they call that flopping. The guy is a clown. Don’t take him too seriously. If you want to take concussions more seriously, then you better start penalizing flopping. Now here we go down this slippery slope because one knucklehead can’t win games on his own, he’s trying to trick the refs. That kind of behavior gets contagious if you don’t put an immediate stop to it.

  58. The NFL does not need to accept or endorse the soccer flop, which is exactly what Newton allegedly did. There needs to be a sanction against the team – it’s hard to do it in real time because the player might be seriously injured. But if it turns out that a flop occurred, perhaps the player needs to sit out the first half of the next game.

    And yeah, you can be sure a LOT of people are going to be paying closer attention. Hopefully, it will piss the league off enough to maybe start actually doing something to greatly reduce head injuries and perhaps save the game we all love. For now, however, I will do everything in my power to keep my grandsons from ever touching a football. It’s important to me that they not be brain dead before I am.

  59. I think it’s ironic how we went from a commercial just a few short years ago which parodied a player getting his bell rung on a big hit (as they used to say before all this concussion talk came about) and when he was helped to the bench he kept saying, I’m Batman!” to the present hysteria we have now every time a player gets hit near his head.
    In addition, anyone remember when just a few short years ago, Tom Jackson and the guys on the ESPN set with him would show highlights of guys getting crushed by big hits and they’d hoot and holler over them???
    All was fun and games then, and now everything is under a microscope. I think these head injuries are definitely something they can’t take lightly, but I also think there’s too much hysteria over this concussion protocol.

  60. I still say I believe the NFL could fix the controversy over these injuries caused by illegal helmet-to-helmet hits by making a rule that if you are flagged for an illegal helmet-to-helmet hit and the player you hit leaves the game, you must also leave the game and only return to the game if the player you hit returns. In addition, if the player you hit misses additional games or time, you must miss the equal amount of games or time.
    And — as much as I hate the replay system, I think helmet-to-helmet hits should be reviewable, in both directions (when they are called and when they are not).
    The coaches should be given an additional challenge which can be used for not called hits or called helmet-to-helmet hits.
    In other words, if the officials don’t call a helmet-to-helmet hit and a coach challenges it, it can be looked at and if it is a helmet-to-helmet hit, the officials can then take the appropriate action for it (including ejecting the player who made the hit) and if it is reviewed and seen to not be a helmet-to-helmet hit, the penalty should be erased.

  61. hellooooooooooobrooklyn says:
    January 24, 2018 at 11:15 am
    The “until it isn’t” gimmick is getting old.
    ____________________

    Unless it isn’t. 🙂

  62. This comes back to the root problem that the NFL is more worried about public opinion than doing the right thing. They are clearly not worried about Newton’s long term health, or if you want to say he was fine just faking an injury then they are not worried about cheating unless it suits their needs. They lie and spin like crazy all the time as they sell lines to the public. They arrange for ‘leaks’ of info to try and hijack public opinion on things, or just outright lie openly. Whats getting under their skin this time around is that the public hasnt been buying it, just too much proof in the face of their tricks and spin. So now they are getting upset and denanding the public not question their word. They had gotten so into thinking they are entitled to being above question they are miffed that people would dare question them.

  63. It is fine if they do not want fans doing the diagnosis. The doctors should do the diagnosis…in the locker room…as the league said it would…to appease media, player’s family members, fans, players, and former players concerns.

    The media is not saying the doctor’s were wrong in a diagnosis. (Although they should reserve the right to suspicion there as well with what we learned in the past). The media is saying the NFL did not meet the standard they set for themselves to make sure the doctor’s are getting the agreed upon conditions to make that diagnosis.

  64. Totally agree with the NFL on this one. My god people, its football. If its too rough for you to watch. DONT WATCH. The NFL should quit folding to public pressure. Get rid of the concussion protocol all together. Wake up. People like the violence of the game. No more player safety rules. They get paid millions!!!!

  65. “Concussion protocol is a joke and players know the risk. If a neurologist says you have a concussion and the player wants to keep playing, that’s on the player now.”

    No, it really isn’t. The player has a brain injury, their decision making, even their awareness of the most basic things (like “where am I?”) is compromised. They cannot be expected to make decisions under those circumstances. Certainly not under circumstances where there is a great deal of pressure from the team and teammates to get back on the field.

    The only reasonable approach is to rule them out. First offense should be the loss of a 3rd round draft pick, plus a large cash fine. Second offense should be the loss of a 1st rounder, plus an even larger cash fine.

    No excuses.

  66. Hall of Famer John Madden didn’t say that when he was coaching.

    Eliminate the tv timeouts after the extra point and have a 45 second concussion timeout to evaluate.
    If it takes longer, then they miss those plays.

  67. We need helmets with g force sensors that have an led lifgt at the base of the helmet. When it lights up due to the sensors being tripped then the helmet gets plugged into the USB jack on the back under the led. This uploads data to a computer that has software that helps with the diagnosis.

    If the player passes protocol in 10 min, the helmet is reset and the player can resume playing. Data is kept on the player.

    I see more head slams by falling backwards than any other hits, these repeated blows to the back of the head add up. This electronic data can follow the player to help them throughout their career so they can make informed off field or off season decisions.

    I’m not a dr, arm chair or not, but I know this technology for sensors and software to assess them exists.

  68. The NFL league office gages public opinion before they “care” about anything. Anyone who thinks the NFL is doing anything but trying to manipulate public opinion is probably on Roger’s Christmas card list.

  69. How dare the NFL not defer to the judgement of a Lawyer turned sports blogger. He is obviously the most qualified to diagnose a concussion. After all he did watch the game on his big screen, and he probably stayed at a reputable hotel, last night.

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