Army’s Brett Toth says the NFL can wait until his military service is complete

GoArmyWestPoint.com

Brett Toth is a 6-foot-6, 305-pound offensive lineman who’s at the Senior Bowl and hoping to make a good impression on NFL talent evaluators. But he has no intention of playing in the NFL this year.

Toth goes to Army, and he has a two-year military commitment to serve. And although athletes from service academies have sometimes been given exemptions that allowed them to play professional sports without going into active military service first, Toth said he has a duty to serve two years and plans to fulfill that duty.

“The NFL dream waits until my service is done,” Toth said, via USA Today. “You have that dream ever since you started playing ball, or even being young and in the backyard playing ball. But again, being at West Point, initially thought it was going to be five years [of military service], for me at least. Going in, I didn’t think [the NFL] was going to be something for me. But now, under the current administration, the requirement is two years, so it looks like I might be doing both.”

Toth didn’t know he was going to grow into the kind of athlete who could be an NFL prospect, but he says even if he had known, he would have chosen West Point over a football factory for college.

“People throw out there: Do I regret it? Absolutely not. I couldn’t imagine it any other way,” he said.

So Toth will serve his country now, and in 2020 he’ll see if some NFL team has interest in a young man who made football his second priority.

43 responses to “Army’s Brett Toth says the NFL can wait until his military service is complete

  1. Wow, now there’s a guy who gets it. if I were a GM, I’d make sure I drafted him just because of what he said here.
    The NFL needs more classy guys and this kid is obviously one of those.

  2. Now there is a young man with integrity and truly knows what commitment means. The best of luck to him in whatever path he takes.

  3. Nice. Of course he would go to West Point again even if he knew how good he would become at football. MUCH harder to get into West Point than Gainesville, Tallahassee or the like.

  4. Let’s not get carried away. Unless something has changed, when he started his third year at West Point he signed paperwork incurring a five year active duty obligation after graduation. Ditto USAFA and my alma mater USNA

  5. It’s admirable, but the Army ought to allow some sort of variance in these cases. I think it’d make a great recruitment vehicle to see an NFL player who was also in the reserves.

  6. This renews your faith that not all athletes are self absorbed and narcissistic. Hopefully he is able to safely fulfill his duties and return to playing football to be a great example for younger(and older)fans that somethings are more important than a game.

  7. Not a surprise he went to the USMA with his feelings towards commitment. Duty, Honor, Country mean something much more to these men!

  8. Glad he didn’t make an issue out of this because athletes aren’t the only one’s at the Academy who have opportunities to do something else then serve. The NFL will be there when he is done with his commitment. There have been times when many weren’t given much of a choice to serve or not.

  9. As the son in law of a Naval Academy grad, his connections are not explainable. Job offers constantly.

    Also have a few friends who went to West Point and 1 to the AFA and nothing but respect for them. Dedicated, determined and focused types and those qualities were enhanced by never giving in or breaking down.

  10. It may be half a century ago (wow!), but serving his time first and then going to the NFL worked just fine for Roger Staubach. Plus, the requirement being lowered from five years to two years makes it more likely to work out for Toth.

  11. I’d suggest he stay away from the Steelers and Tomlin. The way Tomlin publicly shamed Alejandro Villanueva for respecting our flag, anthem, and country is a stain that will never be washed from our memories. #SupportAMVETS!

  12. So will he be available in the draft this year? If so, I wonder if a team will take a late round chance on him. If not, will he just be a free agent and be able to sign with any team he chooses in 2020?

  13. nyneal says:
    January 26, 2018 at 1:38 pm
    Wow, now there’s a guy who gets it. if I were a GM, I’d make sure I drafted him just because of what he said here.

    ———————————————————————-

    ….and that is EXACTLY what he is counting on!

  14. Did they change the service commitment requirement? It was 5 years unless he/she resigns their commission. If they resign, they had to serve 2-4 years (at the discretion of the service Secretary) as enlisted rather than officer. There is a waiver process but, IMHO, the service commitment should never be waived because the person gets a job offer somewhere in the civilian market (in his case, NFL). Kudos to him for making his service commitment a priority rather than whining and trying to get exempted like others have done in the past.

  15. He gets a coveted slot at West Point, taxpayers pay foe his four year degree and full room and board and he only has to serve 24 months, in a cushy job no doubt. Not a bad deal for him.

  16. Lol why all the thumbs down for me asking a question? All good. Is it dumb to ask if a team would use a late round pick on him? I’m sure some teams will shy away from using a high pick on a guy who won’t play for the next 2 years. Or was it dumb for me to ask if he’ll be a free agent? I know lael Collins went undrafted and became a free agent and was able to sign with any team he chose. But I also know bo Jackson was drafted multiple times after he refused to play for the buccs. He was drafted by the raiders the next year too. Talk to me, people.

  17. 1montyco says:

    January 26, 2018 at 2:01 pm

    Let’s not get carried away. Unless something has changed, when he started his third year at West Point he signed paperwork incurring a five year active duty obligation after graduation. Ditto USAFA and my alma mater USNA
    =====================================================================================

    Thanks for your service…..But,The story I read….said 2 years not 5.

  18. To all who gave a “thumbs down” to those who made nice comments about this young man, well, I just feel sorry for you that’s all.

  19. Fully respect that choice. Just understand a few GM’s like your choice, will look to add you if you are aneed and a fit for them. The rest scratched you off their list.

  20. Nyneal so your going to draft someone just because of their character? Great sentiment but dumb idea. You and everyone else would bash the team that drafts a player with lesser talent just because hes a good guy and as a GM you’d probably be out of a job after 2 drafts at most.

  21. He should be at the top of draft boards? I disagree. I would prefer to have someone at the top of my draft board who is 100% committed to football. Obviously football isn’t his number one priority, which to me is a negative mark against him. If I am an GM, and my job is to build the best team possible, I would be looking for players who eat,drink,sleep football.

    Look at it like this : Every day you see stories about football players and off the field activities. Everyday there are comments such as “what a bust. This guy is interested in X,Y,Z, and football isn’t his top priority. What a loser. What could have been.”. Wether they want to be rappers, or actors, or fashion models, or political activists. Anytime someone puts football second, you guys call them out for it. What is different here? Nothing. This guy is more interested in being in the Army than playing football. No way to argue it. Yes, we support and are proud of the military, but if you want to draft a football player, you draft a guy who only cares about football. Not a who considers football behind on the priority list.

  22. January 26, 2018 at 5:42 pm
    1montyco says:
    January 26, 2018 at 2:01 pm
    Let’s not get carried away. Unless something has changed, when he started his third year at West Point he signed paperwork incurring a five year active duty obligation after graduation. Ditto USAFA and my alma mater USNA
    =====================================================================================
    Thanks for your service…..But,The story I read….said 2 years not 5.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    My point is he signed a contract for 5 years of active duty. He can apply for a release from active duty after 2 (he’ll need to do reserve duty) but his request does not have to be approved.

  23. Not sure that i would dock the guy for being in the service academy –not like he out volunteering to fight fires on Saturday night. He gets no credit for honoring his service commitment. People should do what they say they say they will. I’m surprised that it is only two years –that should be changed as we spend a lot of money or invest much money into these future soldiers and they only have serve two years? Four should be starting point–maybe you never get to get out like the CIA–there is no quit.

  24. While it’s ultimately his decision to make, it’s a very bad decision nonetheless.

    He’s giving away prime years of his career for significantly less financial security for himself that he’d never earn while in the service.

    The military isn’t going anywhere. He can serve free and clear after his playing days are done.

  25. It sounds like Toth WANTS to be in the Army over playing in the NFL. Nothing wrong with that. It should be his choice.

    But I think it would do a lot more good for the Army if he was in the NFL than whatever the Army has in store for him over the next two year. He would deliver a lot of positive publicity for the Army. It would be good for recruiting and morale.

    It would be unifying for the country and football fans after the past season.

  26. “He gets a coveted slot at West Point, taxpayers pay foe his four year degree and full room and board and he only has to serve 24 months, in a cushy job no doubt. Not a bad deal for him.”

    He isn’t a hero simply for sticking to his basic commitments, but it does make him a decent person. Respect that he isn’t requesting to get out of his active service duty, but likely neither is anybody else in his West Point class, many if not most of whom probably also have excellent options in the civilian sector. He isn’t going above and beyond, he’s just going.

  27. I see the ESPY’s have a Pat Tillman award. These are some amazing and courageous athletes. Fascinating stories and I am sure all the runner-ups deserve our thanks as well.

  28. Stay as safe as you can be for the next few years, soon-to-be Lt. Toth. I’d love to have you on the team I support but I hope more strongly that you come away from your duties alive and strong, as I wish for every enlisted man and field officer, first and foremost, regardless of which NFL team lands you.

  29. The perfect Belichick player. Low risk, high reward. These are the mid roster players that always make the difference berween teams that collect talent and trams that win SBs.

  30. Great response. Someone coached this kid well. I keep saying this: whether or not you really mean it, public figures must get better at SAYING the right things. This guy knows that sympathy for the military is probably at an all time high. This is a great quote to get the public on your side.

    Seasoned veterans can learn a lot from this kid.

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