Giants contend there is no evidence of memorabilia fraud

Getty Images

As the case against the Giants involving allegations of memorabilia fraud rockets toward trial, pre-trial filings from the competing parties understandably tell very different stories regarding the case.

It’s a normal part of civil litigation. The latest article delving into the situation, posted Tuesday night by ESPN.com, relates to what’s known as a motion for summary judgment, a very common move by defendants who have been sued. In a motion for summary judgment, the defendant argues that there’s no reason for a trial, because there’s not enough proof to justify submitting the dispute to a jury.

If nothing else, the move forces the plaintiff to put some cards on the table regarding the proof that supports the case, essentially giving the defendants a peek inside the eventual playbook for trial.

“Plaintiffs have put forward no evidence supporting the proposition that engaging in memorabilia fraud is the kind of task that any Giants employee was ever employed or otherwise authorized to perform,” the Giants’ lawyers contend in a court filing.

In other words, the Giants contend that any employee who may have provided fake memorabilia to third persons essentially went rogue. The plaintiffs will argue that the Giants have responsibility for any effort by the team’s employees — particularly, equipment manager Joe Skiba — to sell as game-used any memorabilia that wasn’t actually used in games.

The filings include information from dueling expert witnesses. Predictably, one says that the evidence shows fake memorabilia, and the other says it doesn’t.

“After over a year of discovery, and hiring their own expert, the Giants still haven’t shown that Eli Manning gave a single real helmet to Steiner Sports,” Brian C. Brook, one of the attorneys for the plaintiffs, told ESPN.com.

The presiding judge eventually will issue a ruling. It’s typically a high bar to win a case without a trial; in this case, hard-to-explain email messages suggesting the sale of “BS” helmets plus the evidence from the expert witness, who identifies evidence of fraud by matching helmets that were sold as game-used to photos of helmets actually used in games could be enough to persuade the judge to let a jury figure it all out.

11 responses to “Giants contend there is no evidence of memorabilia fraud

  1. Tsk, tsk. Should have destroyed your phone Eli. Like Brady did. Then all the Giants fans could go to their deathbed thinking you were railroaded. Just like Patsy fans.

  2. Now we hear a new story that is remarkably similar to the circumstances events for which one team was held responsible, without regard to the alleged event actually taking place or not, yet others come away with their teflon coating intact. The only explanation that makes sense is that this team was granted certain levels of immunity for winning 2 games against a team that, had they been involved in this exact situation, would be having to suffer harsh penalties. It doesn’t matter that this team has been caught red handed in several recent cheating scandals as well as some questionable personnel issues. They prevented the perfect season thereby garnering the love and admiration of the Jealous 31 and their fans.

  3. I’m just happy the “Brady destroyed his phone” saps are willing to take time out of their valuable schedule of 9 hour fake moon landing podcasts.

  4. After over a year of discovery, and hiring their own expert, the Giants still haven’t shown that Eli Manning gave a single real helmet to Steiner Sports

    Eli’s way too smart for that, picture the “Eli face”, after he throws a pick.

  5. dirtdawg53 says:
    February 14, 2018 at 6:45 am
    Tsk, tsk. Should have destroyed your phone Eli. Like Brady did. Then all the Giants fans could go to their deathbed thinking you were railroaded. Just like Patsy fans.
    ——————-
    Cute salt dispensing, except Brady didn’t destroy it when it was demanded because Wells never demanded it, and Fraudger refused to accept Brady’s phone logs, saying there wasn’t time to go thru them (despite accepting ALL other players’ logs like Cowboys’ Zeke just last year). And anyway, as anyone with a phone will tell you, any message you send will be found on the phone the message was sent to, hence all the messages harvested between Brady and all Patriots’ staff were discovered – and were free of any scheming and the psi data didn’t prove any cheating either, all as NFL lawyer Nash admitted to Judge Berman. The NFL’s successful de novo appeal was purely on the grounds of the Commissioner’s rights under the CBA to both try, arbitrate & suspend a player – and NOT on whether Brady was guilty (because: see NFL’s admission in 1st trial).

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!