Players Coalition members meeting with lawmakers this week

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They’re not just taking knees or raising fists during the national anthem any more.

A number of NFL players are meeting with lawmakers this week, as part of a coordinated effort to create real change in their communities.

According to Rich Cimini of ESPN.com, Saints linebacker Demario Davis was in Albany, New York yesterday to meet with state legislators to lobby against what they believe are race-based disparities in the bail system.

“We’re using our platform and our space to do our part, to raise awareness [on] the social injustices that are going on in our country,” Davis said. “In New York, we’re focusing on criminal reform. That’s just a small piece in a big puzzle.”

The meetings will continue this week. Former Ravens tight end Benjamin Watson is scheduled to participate in a town hall in Baltimore focused on police and community relations. Events Thursday include Washington cornerback Josh Norman leading a group visiting a school to discuss education issues, and Patriots cornerback Devin McCourty and former linebacker Willie McGinest will meet with legislators in Boston regarding juvenile justice issues.

Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins and former wide receiver Anquan Boldin are among those participating in a Harvard University summit on Friday which will discuss criminal justice reform.

The NFL has offered to spend $89 million over the next seven years to fund social projects, and will discuss the platform at next week’s league meetings in Orlando.

13 responses to “Players Coalition members meeting with lawmakers this week

  1. “A number of NFL players are meeting with lawmakers this week, as part of a coordinated effort to create real change in their communities.”

    Does this mean they will no longer kneel during the anthem?

    Or are they meeting with lawmakers trying to justify their kneeling during the anthem?

  2. “to lobby against what they believe are race-based disparities in the bail system.”

    — The bail system? Now there’s a worthy cause.

  3. The lawmakers will make a few empty statements, take some photos then do just as much nothing as they did after meeting the schoolkids from Florida.

  4. aj66shanghai says:
    March 21, 2018 at 7:21 am
    I’m guessing the “why don’t they actually do something” -crowd will still have a problem with it

    ———————-
    Not sure what you mean. Those are the people that wanted to see this all along.

  5. His is a really refreshing and laudable thing to to read.

    These guys are not calling themselves victims, they are establishing themselves as solutions.

    These guys are not just saying that the proverbial ‘somebody else’ should do something. They are looking at themselves as the ones that should do something.

    They are not limiting any time they spend on this to convenient time they would be at work anyhow, they are investing their own selves and time.

    They are not protesting,they are doing, And yet their message is louder than any protest.

  6. Wellman says:

    These guys are not calling themselves victims
    ==================================================

    Yes they are. They complain their bail is too high when they get locked up. They don’t address the actions they do to get locked up.

  7. Real change means personal responsibility. Graduating High School. Being responsible parents. Raising children right and being present in their lives Children going to college or getting jobs. Be productive. Nobody is making these kids not go be productive except themselves and you don’t need to be wealthy to be a responsible person. No more excuses.

  8. Until one of these players go into a community such as south side Chicago and confront the problem head on it is all blather. Saying “bringing awareness” and “starting a conversation” doesn’t do jack!!

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